Pierre Chandon

Pierre Chandon
INSEAD | INSEAD · Area of Marketing

PhD.

About

69
Publications
76,400
Reads
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5,767
Citations
Introduction
I am the L'Oréal chaired professor of marketing, innovation and creativity at INSEAD in France and the Director of the INSEAD Sorbonne Behavioral Lab. My research deals primarily with how food marketing is impacting obesity and what to do about it. All my papers and blogs are available at http://faculty.insead.edu/pierre-chandon
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - July 2012
Harvard University
Position
  • Researcher
June 2011 - present
Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition
Position
  • Associate researcher
September 2005 - July 2006
University of Pennsylvania
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (69)
Article
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Over the past several decades, scholars have highlighted the obligations and opportunities for marketing as a discipline to play a role in creating a better world-or risk becoming irrelevant for the largest problems facing consumers and society. This paper provides a framework to enhance the relevance and rigor of research in marketing that not onl...
Article
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Emerging research has shown that sensory-based interventions (e.g., inviting people to mindfully focus on the multisensory aspects of eating) can be a viable alternative to nutrition-based interventions (e.g., nutrition labeling) to encourage moderate eating. We contribute to this literature in two ways. First, we propose a novel and simple sensory...
Article
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Healthy eating is highly relevant to multiple stakeholders, from consumers to marketers to policymakers: Every consumer makes food decisions daily, food is a $2.5 trillion industry worldwide (Fortune Business Insights 2022), and promoting healthier eating is a major public policy issue given rising obesity rates in most countries. Interest in under...
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Health claims on food packaging can focus on the presence of good (vs. the absence of bad) and the preservation of nature (vs. nutritional improvements). We study the frequency of use of four resulting types of claims (“clean,” “whole,” “diet,” and “enriched”) in three categories over the past ten years and contrast it with the preferences and asso...
Article
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Food consumption and its physiological, psychological, and social antecedents and outcomes have received considerable attention in research across many disciplines, including consumer research. Although researchers use various methods to examine food decision-making, many insights generated stem from observing eating choices in tightly controlled l...
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Society has imposed strict rules about what constitutes a 'good' or a 'bad' food and 'right' or 'wrong' eating behaviour at least since antiquity. Today, the moral discourse of what we should and should not eat is perhaps stronger than ever, and it informs consumers, researchers and policy-makers about what we all should consume, research and regul...
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We first choose what to eat and then we choose how much to eat. Yet as consumer psychologists, we understand food choice much better than food consumption quantity. This review focuses on three powerful drivers of food consumption quantity: 1) Sensory cues (how your senses react), 2) emotional cues (how you feel), and 3) normative cues (how you bel...
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In their commentary of our “Slim by Design” article, Herman and Polivy offer a simple and powerful model of food intake which focuses on the mediating role of hunger, taste, and appropriateness. In their commentary, Roberto, Pomeranz, and Fisher review both new and classic interventions aimed at reducing obesity and raise the issue of whether they...
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A rapid increase in the size of food portions has underlined the importance of understanding consumers’ ability to accurately perceive portion sizes. Drawing on research on motivated perception, we posit that attitude ambivalence (simultaneously desiring a food and perceiving it as unhealthy) enhances visual sensitivity to increasing portion sizes....
Article
Research has shown that subtle health claims used by food marketers influence pre-intake expectations, but no study has examined how they influence individuals' post-consumption experience of satiety after a complete meal and how this varies according to the value placed on food taste. In two experiments, we assess how labeling a pasta salad as "he...
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With rising public concerns about waste and overconsumption, predicting and effectively managing consumers’ package size impressions have become critical for both marketers and public health advocates. The AddChange heuristic model of size impression assumes that people add (instead of multiplying) the percentage changes in the height, width, and l...
Article
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Using archival and experimental data, we showed that vicarious defeats experienced by fans when their favorite football team loses lead them to consume less healthy food. On the Mondays following a Sunday National Football League (NFL) game, saturated-fat and food-calorie intake increase significantly in cities with losing teams, decrease in cities...
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Because packaging reaches consumers at the critical moments of purchase and consumption, it has become an important marketing tool for food manufacturers and retailers. In this paper, I first review how the marketing, health and nutrition claims made on packaging create “health halos” that make foods appear healthier than they are, thereby leading...
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Food marketing is often singled out as the leading cause of the obesity epidemic. The present review examines current food marketing practices to determine how exactly they may be influencing food intake, and how food marketers could meet their business objectives while helping people eat healthier. Particular attention is paid to the insights prov...
Article
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It is widely believed that increasing the equality of material possessions or income in a social group should lead people at the bottom of the distribution to consume less and save more. However, this prediction and its causal mechanism have never been studied experimentally. Five studies show that greater equality increases the satisfaction of tho...
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Whereas everyone recognizes that increasing obesity rates worldwide are driven by a complex set of interrelated factors, the marketing actions of the food industry are often singled out as one of the main culprits. But how exactly is food marketing making us fat? To answer this question, we review evidence provided by studies in marketing, nutritio...
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Does asking people about their future behavior increase or decrease the likelihood that they will repeat their past behavior? In two laboratory and two field experiments, we find that behavior prediction strengthens behavior repetition, making people more likely to do what they normally do, when personal norms regarding engaging in a behavior are w...
Article
It is widely believed that increasing the equality of material possessions or income in a social group should lead people at the bottom of the distribution to consume less and save more. However, this prediction and its causal mechanism have never been studied experimentally. Five studies show that greater equality increases the satisfaction of tho...
Article
Full-text available
Calorie estimation is error-prone and subject to three systematic, large-scale, and unconscious biases which strongly influence food intake. Calorie estimates tend to be slightly too large for small portions but strongly too small for large portions because calorie estimations are not sensitive enough to the actual increase in portion size, and thi...
Article
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Understanding consumer response to product supersizing and downsizing is important for policy makers, consumer researchers, and marketers. In three laboratory experiments and two field studies, the authors find that changes in size appear smaller when packages and portions change in all three spatial dimensions-height, width, and length-than when t...
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Recent trends in marketing have demonstrated an increased focus on in-store expenditures with the hope of “grabbing consumers” at the point of purchase: but does it make sense? To help answer this question, the authors examine the interplay between in-store and out-of-store factors on consumer attention to and evaluation of brands displayed on supe...
Article
Understanding consumer response to product supersizing and downsizing is an important issue for policy makers, consumer researchers and marketers. In three laboratory experiments the authors found that changes in size appear smaller when products change in all three dimensions (height, width, and length) than when they change in only one dimension....
Article
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Marketers cultivate brand relatedness in their brand portfolios to increase marketing efficiency through positive spillover of brand equity. However, creating linkages between brands may also make them vulnerable to negative spillover. This research investigates the structure of relatedness in a brand portfolio to understand the nature of spillover...
Article
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An abstract of the article "Breaking Behavior Repetition: New Insights on the Role of Habits and Intentions," by Peirre Chandon and Vicki G. Morwitz is presented.
Article
Our objective was to investigate whether people who use internal cues of satiation when eating a meal are likely to weigh less than people who instead rely on external cues. In addition to exploring the role that internal and external cues play in meal cessation, this study raises an overlooked explanation of the French paradox. A demographically-m...
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Why is America a land of low-calorie food claims yet high-calorie food intake? Four studies show that people are more likely to underestimate the caloric content of main dishes and to choose higher-calorie side dishes, drinks, or desserts when fast-food restaurants claim to be healthy ( e. g., Subway) compared to when they do not ( e. g., McDonald'...
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Calorie underestimation is often alleged to contribute to obesity. By developing a psychophysical model of meal size estimation, the authors show that the association between body mass and calorie underestimation found in health science research is a spurious consequence of the tendency of high-body-mass people to choose--and thus estimate--larger...
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The article focuses on the relationship between dining out and obesity in the U.S. It explains that restaurants which advertise healthy menus may be promoting obesity in the long run. The chain fast food restaurants Subway and McDonald's are mentioned and information about research on the topic is presented.
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Although we know that many behaviors are repeated, we know little about what influences the strength and likelihood of behavior repetition. In this paper, we argue that asking people to predict their future behavior increases the chances that they will repeat what they have done in the past when normative beliefs are weak but reduces the likelihood...
Article
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The article discusses a parsimonious decision-path model of visual attention and brand consideration to demonstrate how eye-tracking data can be utilized to drive a brand's consideration into its memory-based baseline and its visual lift. It also provides insights into the decision-making process of consumers at the point of purchase, specifically...
Article
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Two laboratory studies investigate how behavior prediction and personal norms interact to influence whether or not people repeat their past behavior. We find that asking people about their future behavior increases their likelihood of repeating past behaviors when personal norms are weak but reduces it when personal norms are strong. By identifying...
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An abstract of the conference paper "The French Paradox Redux: Internal and External Cues of Meal Cessation," by Brian Wansink, Collin R. Payne, Pierre Chandon and Paul Rozin is presented.
Article
Information about a special session at the Advances in Consumer Research North American Conference on food and consumers is presented. Topics from the session included pleasure and guilt in eating habits, the perception of healthfulness in food, and self-regulation. The role of food labeling and portion size in eating was also discussed.
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In this era of increasing obesity and increasing threats of legislation and regulation of food marketing practices, regulatory agencies have pointedly asked how "low-fat" nutrition claims may influence food consumption. The authors develop and test a framework that contends that low-fat nutrition labels increase food intake by (1) increasing percep...
Article
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The authors develop a model of how consumers estimate the level of product inventory in their households. Two laboratory experiments and two field studies involving 29 product categories show that (1) consumers anchor their estimates on their average inventory and fail to adjust sufficiently; (2) adjustments follow an inelastic psychophysical power...
Article
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Studies of the relationship between purchase intentions and purchase behavior have ignored the possibility that the very act of measurement may inflate the association between intentions and behavior, a phenomenon called "self-generated validity." In this research, the authors develop a latent model of the reactive effects of measurement that is ap...
Article
This article deals with research on the effects of self-generated validity on consumer research. The objectives of the study "The Self-Generated Validity of Measured Purchase Intentions" are: to offer a method for simultaneously measuring mere-measurement and self-generated validity effects; and to apply the method to test the prediction that measu...
Article
Comments on an article which discussed the relationships between purchase intentions and purchase behavior of consumers. Discussion on the tendency of commonplace procedures and models, such as ACNielsen BASES model, to overestimate and overstate aggregate purchase probabilities; Findings of a survey of the latent purchase intentions for both surve...
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We compare the incidence, timing, and profitability of repeated online grocery purchases made by a cohort of consumers whose purchase intentions were measured with those of similar consumers whose intentions were not measured. We find that measuring intentions increases the likelihood of repeat purchase incidence and shortens the time until the fir...
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Reviews innovative marketing strategies after patent expiry illustrating the case of SmithKline Beecham's antibiotic Clamoxyl in France. Radical alteration of the competitive landscape and call for appropriate radical response following the entry of generic competitors; Review of the five major strategies available to pharmaceutical brands facing c...
Article
Presents cases of innovative market strategies after the expiry of patents. Use of pharmaceutical branding for Clamoxyl to counter generic drugs; Issues of global branding and poisoning; Establishment of a mutually beneficial relationship with a government reimbursement authority.
Article
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When people stockpile products, how do they decide when and how much they will consume? To answer this question, the authors develop a framework that shows how the salience and convenience of products influence postpurchase consumption incidence and quantity. Multiple research methods--including scanner data analysis, a field study, and two laborat...
Article
Abstract In today’s cluttered retail environments, creating consumer pull through memory-based brand equity is not enough; marketers must also create “visual equity” for their brands (i.e., incremental sales triggered by in-store visual attention). In this paper, we show that commercial eye-tracking data, analyzed using a simple decision-path model...
Article
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A working paper in the INSEAD Working Paper Series is intended as a means whereby a faculty researcher's thoughts and findings may be communicated to interested readers. The paper should be considered preliminary in nature and may require revision.
Article
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The construction of a framework of the multiple consumer benefits of a sales promotion is discussed. Through a series of measurement studies, the authors find that monetary and nonmonetary promotions provide consumers with different levels of 3 hedonic benefits (opportunities for value expression, entertainment and exploration) and 3 utilitarian be...
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Many research traditions have dealt with consumer psychology and behaviour vis-a-vis sales promotions. The consumer-oriented approach seeks to identify the heavy users of promotions and to track their purchasing strategies involving the choice of a promoted brand. The aim of the theory-oriented research traditions is to test the explanatory power o...
Article
The dramatic increase in sales promotion modeling stems from the availability of scanner data. We have identified three main research traditions, according to the dependent variable chosen: sales promotion models based on market or store level scanner data; choice models based on individual level scanner data; and decision support models. This arti...
Article
Many research traditions have dealt with consumer psychology and behavior vis-a-vis sales promotions. The consumer-oriented approach seeks to identify the users of promotions and to track their purchasing strategies concerning the choice of a promoted brand. The aim of the theoretically-oriented research traditions is to test the explanatory power...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Reducing package sizes can be a win-win for food marketers and public health--but it has to be done right to get consumers' acceptance. We think that our research and Excel macro can help. Do you agree?

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