Piero Calosi

Piero Calosi
Université du Québec à Rimouski UQAR | uqar · Département de Biologie, Chimie et Géographie

PhD

About

196
Publications
51,599
Reads
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Citations
Introduction
My main research focus is the investigation of invertebrates' physiological and life-history responses, and the determination of their scope for further adaptation, to multiple global environmental drivers: e.g. warming, acidification, changes in salinity and de-oxygenation. I work from larvae to adults using laboratory natural selection experiments and in situ translocations to compare strains and populations, in order to understand species ability to adapt to rapid environmental changes.
Additional affiliations
July 2014 - July 2016
University of Plymouth
Position
  • Invited Lecturer in Marine Ecophysiology
July 2014 - present
Université du Québec à Rimouski UQAR
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
October 2012 - present
University of Gothenburg
Position
  • Invited Lecturer
Education
October 1995 - December 2000
University of Florence
Field of study
  • Biology - Environmental Ecology (research project with Ugolini and Chelazzi). Vote 110/110 - 1st Class, Honours.

Publications

Publications (196)
Article
Full-text available
Physiological responses to temperature are known to be a major determinant of species distributions and can dictate the sensitivity of populations to global warming. In contrast, little is known about how other major global change drivers, such as ocean acidification (OA), will shape species distributions in the future. Here, by integrating populat...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean warming and acidification are concomitant global drivers that are currently threatening the survival of marine organisms. How species will respond to these changes depends on their capacity for plastic and adaptive responses. Little is known about the mechanisms that govern plasticity and adaptability or how global changes will influence thes...
Article
Full-text available
Projections of marine biodiversity and implementation of effective actions for its maintenance in face of current rapid global environmental change are constrained by our limited understanding of species’ adaptive responses, including, transgenerational plasticity, epigenetics, natural selection. This special issue presents 13 novel studies, which...
Article
Full-text available
Assessments of the combined ecological impacts of ocean acidification and warming (OAW) and their social and economic consequences can help develop adaptive and responsive management strategies in the most sensitive regions. Here, available observational and experimental data, theoretical, and modelling approaches are combined to project and quanti...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification (OA) is likely to exert selective pressure on natural popula- tions. Our ability to predict which marine species will adapt to OA and what underlies this adaptive potential is of high conservation and resource manage- ment priority. Using a naturally low-pH vent site in the Mediterranean Sea (Castello Aragonese, Ischia) mirrorin...
Article
Full-text available
Among ectotherms, rare species are expected to have a narrower thermal niche breadth and reduced acclimation capacity and thus be more vulnerable to global warming than their common relatives. To assess these hypotheses, we experimentally quantified the thermal sensitivity of seven common, uncommon, and rare species of temperate marine annelids of...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean acidification (OA) affects marine organisms through various physiological and biological processes, yet our understanding of how these translate to large-scale population effects remains limited. Here, we integrated laboratory-based experimental results on the life history and physiological responses to OA of the American lobster, Homarus ame...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing decapod sensitivity to regional-scale ocean acidification (OA) conditions is limited because of a fragmented understanding of the thresholds at which they exhibit biological response. To address this need, we undertook a three-step data synthesis: first, we compiled a dataset composed of 27,000 datapoints from 55 studies of decapod respon...
Presentation
Polar lipids are the most abundant class of lipids in several marine organisms. Among these, phospholipids (PL) have attracted substantial attention do to their importance as a source of essential fatty acids and because they enable high bioavailability of omega fatty acids than triglycerides. While the Northern shrimp Pandalus borealis is one of t...
Article
Full-text available
Bentho-pelagic life cycles are the dominant reproductive strategy in marine invertebrates, providing great dispersal ability, access to different resources, and the opportunity to settle in suitable habitats upon the trigger of environmental cues at key developmental moments. However, free-dispersing larvae can be highly sensitive to environmental...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic plasticity in parental care investment allows organisms to promptly respond to rapid environmental changes by potentially benefiting offspring survival and thus parental fitness. To date, a knowledge gap exists on whether plasticity in parental care behaviors can mediate responses to climate change in marine ectotherms. Here, we assessed...
Article
Full-text available
Assessing the vulnerability of marine invertebrates to ocean acidification (OA) requires an understanding of critical thresholds at which developmental, physiological, and behavioral traits are affected. To identify relevant thresholds for echinoderms, we undertook a three-step data synthesis, focused on California Current Ecosystem (CCE) species....
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how species’ thermal limits have evolved across the tree of life is central to predicting species’ responses to climate change. Here, using experimentally-derived estimates of thermal tolerance limits for over 2000 terrestrial and aquatic species, we show that most of the variation in thermal tolerance can be attributed to a combinati...
Preprint
Full-text available
Among ectotherms, rare species are expected to have a narrower thermal niche breadth and reduced acclimation capacity and thus be more vulnerable to global warming than their common relatives. To assess these hypotheses, we experimentally quantified the thermal sensitivity of seven common, uncommon, and rare species of temperate marine annelids of...
Article
Full-text available
Genome size, known also as the C-value, has been proposed as an important determinant of life-history variation in numerous animal taxa. We assessed the relationships between genome size and fitness-related life-history traits in six species of interstitial marine annelids of the genus Ophryotrocha. Life-history traits and genome size data obtained...
Article
Full-text available
Background Annelids are one the most speciose and ecologically diverse groups of metazoans. Although a significant effort has been recently invested in sequencing genomes of a wide array of metazoans, many orders and families within the phylum Annelida are still represented by a single specimen of a single species. The genus of interstitial annelid...
Article
Tens of thousands of anthropogenic chemicals and wastes enter the marine environment each year as a consequence of the ever-increasing anthropogenic activities and demographic growth of the human population, which is majorly concentrated along coastal areas. Marine ecotoxicology has had a crucial role in helping shed light on the fate of chemicals...
Article
Full-text available
Nutritional and organoleptic qualities (taste, smell, texture, appearance) are key characteristics of seafood when it comes to defining consumer choices. These qualities, which are determined by the biochemical properties of the seafood, can be altered by environmental conditions, such as those imposed by ongoing global ocean change. However, these...
Article
Full-text available
Diving as a lifestyle has evolved on multiple occasions when air-breathing terrestrial animals invaded the aquatic realm, and diving performance shapes the ecology and behaviour of all air-breathing aquatic taxa, from small insects to great whales. Using the largest dataset yet assembled, we show that maximum dive duration increases predictably wit...
Article
Full-text available
Regulation of extracellular acid-base balance, while maintaining energy metabolism, is recognised as an important aspect when defining an organism's sensitivity to environmental changes. This study investigated the haemolymph buffering capacity and energy metabolism (oxygen consumption, haemolymph [l-lactate] and [protein]) in early benthic juvenil...
Article
Full-text available
Trans-generational plasticity (TGP) represents a primary mechanism for guaranteeing species persistence under rapid global changes. To date, no study on TGP responses of marine organisms to global change scenarios in the ocean has been conducted on phylogenetically closely related species, and we thus lack a true appreciation for TGP inter-species...
Article
Ocean acidification (OA) along the US West Coast is intensifying faster than observed in the global ocean. This is particularly true in nearshore regions (<200 m) that experience a lower buffering capacity while at the same time providing important habitats for ecologically and economically significant species. While the literature on the effects o...
Article
Full-text available
Global warming appears to favour smaller-bodied organisms, but whether larger species are also more vulnerable to thermal extremes, as suggested for past mass-extinction events, is still an open question. Here, we tested whether interspecific differences in thermal tolerance (heat and cold) of ectotherm organisms are linked to differences in their...
Article
Linking variation in species' traits to large-scale environmental gradients can lend insight into the evolutionary processes that have shaped functional diversity and future responses to environmental change. Here, we ask how heat and cold tolerance vary as a function of latitude, elevation and climate extremes, using an extensive global dataset of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global warming appears to favour smaller-bodied organisms, but whether larger species are also more vulnerable to thermal extremes, as suggested for past mass-extinction events, is still an open question. Here, we tested whether interspecific differences in thermal tolerance (heat and cold) of ectotherm organisms are linked to differences in their...
Preprint
Full-text available
Global warming appears to favour smaller-bodied organisms, but whether larger species are also more vulnerable to thermal extremes, as suggested for past mass-extinction events, is still an open question. Here, we tested whether interspecific differences in thermal tolerance (heat and cold) of ectotherm organisms are linked to differences in their...
Article
Full-text available
Inter‐individual variation in phenotypic traits has long been considered as “noise” rather than meaningful phenotypic variation, with biological studies almost exclusively generating and reporting average responses for populations and species’ average responses. Here, we compare the use of an individual approach in the investigation of extracellula...
Article
Little is known about the life-history trade-offs and limitations, and the physiological mechanisms that are associated with phenotypic adaptation to future ocean conditions. To address this knowledge gap, we investigated the within- and trans-generation life-history responses and aerobic capacity of a marine polychaete, Ophryotrocha labronica, to...
Article
Full-text available
In the face of global warming, both the absolute thermal tolerance of an ectotherms, and its ability to shift its tolerance level via acclimation, are thought to be fundamentally important. Understanding the links between tolerance and its plasticity is therefore critical to accurately predict vulnerability to warming. Previous studies in a number...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean warming (OW) and acidification (OA) are key features of global change and are predicted to have negative consequences for marine species and ecosystems. At a smaller scale increasing oil and gas activities at northern high latitudes could lead to greater risk of petroleum pollution, potentially exacerbating the effects of such global stressor...
Article
Changes in environmental conditions can have a profound impact on organismal processes. For aquatic organisms, changes in dissolved oxygen concentration can have major repercussions, notably for physiological processes that have high long-term energetic costs and are more likely to rely on aerobic metabolic pathways. Here we propose a simple colleg...
Article
Full-text available
Northern oceans are in a state of rapid transition. Still, our knowledge of the likely effects of climate change and ocean acidification on key species in the food web, functionally important habitats and the structure of Arctic and sub-Arctic ecosystems is limited and based mainly on short-term laboratory studies on single species. This review dis...
Article
The transition from the last pelagic larval stage to the first benthic juvenile stage in the complex life cycle of marine invertebrates, such as the American lobster Homarus americanus, a species of high economic importance, represents a delicate phase in these species development. Under future elevated pCO2 conditions, ocean acidification and othe...
Article
Evolution, extinction, and dispersion are fundamental processes affecting marine biodiversity. Until recently, studies of extant marine systems focused mainly on evolution and dispersion, with extinction receiving less attention. Past extinction events have, however, shaped the evolutionary history of marine ecosystems, with ecological and evolutio...
Article
Within coastal marine habitats, intense nutrient cycling and near-seabed primary production rates are strongly influenced by the transport and transformation of materials within the sediment and across the sediment-water interface. Through processes such as bioturbation and bio-irrigation, benthic infauna play a significant role in mediating this t...
Data
Supplementary material of Lucey et al. MEPS 2018 vol. 589
Article
Full-text available
How climate affects species distributions is a longstanding question receiving renewed interest owing to the need to predict the impacts of global warming on biodiversity. Is climate change forcing species to live near their critical thermal limits? Are these limits likely to change through natural selection? These and other important questions can...
Article
Low-pH vent systems are ideal natural laboratories to study the consequences of long-term low-pH exposure on marine species and thus identify life-history traits associated with low-pH tolerance. This knowledge can help to inform predictions on which types of species may be less vulnerable in future ocean acidification (OA) scenarios. Accordingly,...
Article
Full-text available
Widespread ocean acidification (OA) is transforming the chemistry of the global ocean and the Arctic is recognised as the region where this transformation will occur at the fastest rate. Moreover, many Arctic species are considered less capable of tolerating OA due to their lower capacity for acid-base regulation. This inability may put severe rest...
Article
Full-text available
Areas of the Arctic Ocean are already experiencing seasonal variation in low pH/elevated pCO2 and are predicted to be the most affected by future ocean acidification (OA). Krill play a fundamental ecological role within Arctic ecosystems, serving as a vital link in the transfer of energy from phytoplankton to higher trophic levels. However, little...
Article
Full-text available
Increasing use of fish feed containing the chitin synthesis inhibiting anti-parasitic drug diflubenzuron (DFB) in salmon aquaculture has raised concerns over its impact on coastal ecosystems. Larvae of Northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) were exposed to DFB medicated feed under Control conditions (7.0 °C, pH 8.0) and under Ocean Acidification and W...
Article
Full-text available
Widespread ocean acidification (OA) is modifying the chemistry of the global ocean, and the Arctic is recognised as the region where the changes will progress at the fastest rate. Moreover, Arctic species show lower capacity for cellular homeostasis and acid-base regulation rendering them particularly vulnerable to OA. In the present study, we foun...
Poster
Global warming poses a major threat to marine biodiversity. Considering the intensity and the rate with which these changes will occur, species’ persistence will depend on their ability to respond to these changes through phenotypic plasticity and rapid adaptation. However, the physiological genetic and non-genetic mechanisms underpinning these res...
Article
Full-text available
Marine ecosystems are currently in a state of flux, with ocean warming and acidification occurring at unprecedented rates. Phenotypic plasticity underpins acclimatory responses by shifting the mean phenotype in a population, which may buffer the negative effects of global change. However, little is known about how phenotypic plasticity evolves acro...
Article
In order to define the relative vulnerability of northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) populations to the ongoing global warming, we compared the thermal performance curves for survival and growth in the first three pelagic larval stages from three populations of the Northwest Atlantic. Egg carrying females were obtained from different regions charac...
Article
The composition of local ecological communities is determined by the members of the regional community that are able to survive the abiotic and biotic conditions of a local ecosystem. Anthropogenic activities since the industrial revolution have increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations, which have in turn decreased ocean pH and altered carbonate io...
Article
Elevated concentration of carbon dioxide (elevated pCO2) that cause reduced pH is known to influence calcification in many marine taxa, but how elevated pCO2 influences cation composition of mineralized structures is less well studied. To a large extent, the degree to which elevated pCO2 impacts mineralized structures is influenced by physiological...
Article
Full-text available
Co-occurring global change drivers, such as ocean warming and acidification, can have large impacts on the behaviour, physiology, and health of marine organisms. However, whilst early-life stages are thought to be most sensitive to these impacts, little is known about the individual level processes by which such impacts take place. Here, using meso...
Article
Ocean acidification (OA) poses a major threat to marine ecosystems globally, having significant ecological and economic importance. The number and complexity of experiments examining the effects of OA has substantially increased over the past decade, in an attempt to address multi-stressor interactions and long-term responses in an increasing range...
Article
Many aquatic animals grow into colonies of repeated, genetically identical, modules (zooids). Zooid interconnections enable colonies to behave as integrated functional units, while plastic responses to environmental changes may affect individual zooids. Plasticity includes the variable partitioning of resources to sexual reproduction, colony growth...
Data
Supplementary Figures, Supplementary Tables and Supplementary References
Article
Full-text available
Co-occurring global change drivers, such as ocean warming and acidification, can have large impacts on the behaviour, physiology and health of marine organisms. However, whilst early life stages are thought to be most sensitive to these impacts, little is known about the individual level processes by which such impacts take place. Here, using mesoc...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean warming and acidification are concomitant global drivers that are currently threatening the survival of marine organisms. How species will respond to these changes depends on their capacity for plastic and adaptive responses. Little is known about the mechanisms that govern plasticity and adaptability or how global changes will influence thes...
Article
Full-text available
Non-calcifying photosynthetic anthozoans have emerged as a group that may thrive under high pCO2 conditions via increased productivity. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying this potential success are unclear. Here we investigated the impact of high pCO2 on the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) use, in the temperate sea anemone Anemonia v...