Pierick Mouginot

Pierick Mouginot
French National Centre for Scientific Research | CNRS · Centre de Recherches Insulaires et Observatoire de l’Environnement (CRIOBE - USR 3278)

PhD.

About

16
Publications
1,738
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91
Citations
Citations since 2017
15 Research Items
88 Citations
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Introduction
I am currently working as a biostatistician on an ERC project (ANGI). I am analyzing phenotypic and genetic data from a long term survey (>10 years) of Snapdragon populations. The aim is to learn more about the ecology of the species in natural populations and derive analyses of phenotypic change over time, selection and heritabilities ... I am using multi-model inferences on one hand, and quantitative genetics methods on the other hand.
Additional affiliations
October 2019 - present
French National Centre for Scientific Research
Position
  • Engineer
Description
  • Statistical analysis of a long term survey of Snapdragon populations (Antirrhinum majus): Phenotypic change along time, selection analysis, heritability, pedigree.
February 2019 - September 2019
The Czech Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Theoretical modelling of brood parasitism in the cuckoo catfish Synodontis multipunctatus. Game theory and population dynamics modelling approaches
February 2018 - May 2018
University of Greifswald
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • Heritability in stressful environment in the spider mite Tetranychus urticae. In collaboration with Prof. Dries Bonte (TEREC) at the University of Ghent, Belgium.
Education
September 2009 - June 2011
University of Burgundy
Field of study
  • ecology

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Background: In contrast with historical knowledge, a recent view posits that a non-negligible proportion of populations thrive in a fragmented landscape. One underlying mechanism is the maintenance of functional connectivity, i.e., the net flow of individuals or their genes moving among suitable habitat patches. Alternatively, functional connectivi...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding factors affecting male mate choice can be important for tracking the dynamics of sexual selection in nature. Male brown widow spiders (Latrodectus geometricus) mate with adult as well as immature (subadult) females. Mating with adults involves costly courtship with a repertoire of signaling behaviors, and typically ends with cannibali...
Article
Full-text available
Experimental studies on local adaptation rarely investigate how different environmental variables might modify signals of adaptation or maladaptation. In plant common garden experiments, signals of adaptation or maladaptation to elevation are usually investigated in open habitats under full light. However, most plants inhabit heterogeneous habitats...
Article
Background: In contrast with historical knowledge, a recent view posits that a non-negligible proportion of populations might respond positively to habitat fragmentation. Populations might thrive in a fragmented landscape if functional connectivity, i.e., the net flow of individuals or their genes moving among suitable habitat patches, is not restr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Anthropogenic climate change is rapidly altering ecosystems, driving range shifts, range contractions, dwindling population sizes and local extinctions in many species. Some species, however, are expanding their ranges and seem to benefit from warming temperatures. This is the case for the wasp spider, Argiope bruennichi, which has undergone a rang...
Article
Full-text available
Signatures of local adaptation have been found at all life stages in plants. Yet, the contribution of later plant stages is rarely disentangled from the influence of early-life stages. Here, we investigate the direct contribution of adult plant stages to climate adaptation in two subspecies of snapdragon plants (Antirrhinum majus), while growth con...
Article
Significance Developmental plasticity is defined as the ability of an organism to adjust its development depending on environmental signals, thus producing alternative phenotypes precisely adjusted to the environment. Yet, the mechanisms underlying developmental plasticity are not fully understood. We found that juvenile clownfish delay the develop...
Article
Full-text available
The phenotypic plasticity of plants in response to change in their light environment, and in particularly, to shade is a schoolbook example of ecologically relevant phenotypic plasticity with evolutionary adaptive implications. Epigenetic variation is known to potentially underlie plant phenotypic plasticity. Yet, little is known about its role in...
Article
In animals that regularly experience tissue loss, physiological responses may have evolved to overcome the related costs. Changes in oxidative status may reflect such self-maintenance mechanisms. Here, we investigated how markers of oxidative status vary in female orb-weaving spiders (Larinia jeskovi) by mimicking two distinct types of tissue loss...
Article
Assessing the genetic adaptive potential of populations and species is essential for better understanding evolutionary processes. However, the expression of genetic variation may depend on environmental conditions, which may speed up or slow down evolutionary responses. Thus, the same selection pressure may lead to different responses. Against this...
Preprint
Full-text available
In animals that regularly experience tissue loss, physiological responses may have evolved to overcome the related costs. Changes in oxidative status may reflect such self-maintenance mechanisms. Here, we investigated how markers of oxidative status varied in female orb-weaving spiders (Larinia jeskovi) by mimicking two distinct types of tissue los...
Article
When females can mate multiply, the interests of both sexes over female remating may not coincide, leading to selection for adaptations and counteradaptations in males and females. In several orb-weaving spiders, males damage external structures of the female genitalia during copulation, which hinders the female from remating. We investigated wheth...
Article
Full-text available
Sperm competition may select for male reproductive traits that influence female mating or oviposition rate. These traits may induce fitness costs to the female; however, they may be costly for the males as well as any decrease in female fitness also affects male fitness. Male adaptations to sperm competition manipulate females by altering not only...
Article
Full-text available
The expression of an individual's phenotypic traits can be influenced by genes expressed in its social partners. Theoretical models predict that such indirect genetic effects (IGEs) on reproductive traits should play an important role in determining the evolutionary outcome of sexual conflict. However, empirical tests of (i) whether reproductive IG...
Article
Full-text available
Competition between males and their sperm over access to females and their eggs [ 1–3 ] has resulted in manifold ways by which males try to secure paternity, ranging from physically guarding the female after mating to reducing her receptivity or her attractiveness to subsequent males by transferring manipulative substances [ 4, 5 ] or by mechanical...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Competition between males for the access to fertilization starts before copulation and continues after sperm transfer, especially in species with internal fertilization. This has resulted in manifold ways by which males try to secure paternity. We explore the causes and consequences of female genital mutilation by combining behavioural experiments, morphological and physiological methods, genetic analyses as well as theoretical modelling.
Project
We analyse mechanisms of mate choice and of sperm competition with behavioural, morphological and genetic methods.