Phillip Ozimek

Phillip Ozimek
FernUniversität in Hagen · Institut für Psychologie

Dr. rer. nat.

About

26
Publications
14,937
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174
Citations

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Facebook use is analyzed depending on age and occurrence of social comparisons. The hypotheses state that age is negatively associated with Facebook use and that this association is mediated by social comparison orientation. Data collection was realized via the Internet. The online-questionnaire included information on Facebook use on the basis of...
Article
Social Networking Sites like Facebook are an upcoming phenomenon of the modern age. The Social Online Self-regulation Theory (SOS-T) proposes that people use Facebook in order to self-regulate. Using Facebook they regulate their emotions and satisfy a variety of needs and motives. The study's aim was to provide first evidence for the theory by exam...
Article
Abstract This work examines the assumption that grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, although positively correlated, have different consequences for frequency and time expenditure of Facebook use and, additionally, the importance of social comparisons for both constructs. Participants completed measures of Facebook use, grandiose narcissism, vulner...
Article
We conducted three studies to assess short-term and long-term effects of social comparative SNS use on self-esteem and depressive tendencies. In Study 1 (N = 75) we found in an exposure experiment including two experimental groups and one control group that social comparative internet use decreased participants’ performance-oriented state self-este...
Article
Full-text available
This review aims, first, to introduce a novel theory for social media use, the so-called social online self-regulation theory (SOS-T) by embedding it into an exhaustive literature review, second, to present correlational as well as experimental evidence for the model from our own lab and beyond, and, third, to discuss self-regulatory variables corr...
Article
Full-text available
Since more and more people have begun to use social networking sites (SNSs), research on the use of SNSs is flourishing. This study examines Instagram use and the psychological well-being of the users. It was conducted based on two samples ( n 1 = 143 and n 2 = 320) examining the relationship between Instagram use, social capital, and satisfaction...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: People who experience high levels of daily stress often resort to intensive social media use (SMU). In the short-term, this can contribute to relief and positive emotions. However, in the longer-term, intensive online activity can foster addictive tendencies. The present longitudinal study investigated the association between daily st...
Article
Full-text available
Past research showed that social networking sites represent perfect platforms to satisfy narcissistic needs. The present study aimed to investigate how grandiose (GN) and vulnerable narcissism (VN) as well as social comparisons are associated with Facebook activity, which was measured with a self-report on three activity dimensions: Acting, Impress...
Article
Full-text available
On the basis of recent findings in the context of the Social Online Self-Regulation Theory it is assumed that intensity of social Facebook use (i.e., a higher intensity and more time spend on Facebook focusing on social activities) serves the purpose of self-regulation. A priming of unfulfilled goals was used to increase participants’ intensity of...
Article
Full-text available
Das Handeln im beruflichen und privaten Alltag wird oft von scheinbaren Selbstverständlichkeiten gesteuert, die in der Regel nicht weiter in Frage gestellt werden. Solche Selbstverständlichkeiten beruhen häufig auf Stereotypen und Vorurteilen, die eine verzerrte und einseitige soziale Wahrnehmung zur Folge haben. Es kommt zu Übergeneralisierungen u...
Presentation
Full-text available
Ziel dieses Beitrags ist die Darstellung von drei Studien zur Erfassung kurzfristiger und langfristiger Effekte von sozial-vergleichendem Gebrauch der sozialen Netzwerke Facebook und XING auf den Selbstwert und depressive Tendenzen. Studie 1 (N = 75) zeigte im Rahmen einer Internetexposition im Labor, dass eine sozial-vergleichende Aufgabe im Inter...
Presentation
Full-text available
Ziel dieses Beitrags ist die Darstellung von drei Studien zur Erfassung kurzfristiger und langfristiger Effekte von sozial-vergleichendem Gebrauch der sozialen Netzwerke Facebook und XING auf den Selbstwert und depressive Tendenzen. Studie 1 (N = 75) zeigte im Rahmen einer Internetexposition im Labor, dass eine sozial-vergleichende Aufgabe im Inter...
Article
The present study's (N = 145) aim was to introduce a multidimensional behavioural report for assessing activity on the professional social network site (SNS) XING and to carry out a comparison with private SNS use (i.e. Facebook). Psychometric analyses revealed good internal consistency and construct validity of the new XING Activity Questionnaire....
Article
Full-text available
In this study, we examine chronic materialism as a possible motive for Facebook usage. We test an explanatory mediation model predicting that materialists use Facebook more frequently, because they compare themselves to others, they objectify and instrumentalize others, and they accumulate friends. For this, we conducted two online surveys (N 1 = 2...
Poster
Full-text available
Narcissism influences how people communicate with others. Previous theory and research has led to the distinction between grandiose and vulnerable narcissism. This work examines the assumption that grandiose and vulnerable narcissism, although positively correlated, have different consequences for frequency and time expenditure of Facebook use. Res...
Poster
Full-text available
Soziale Online-Netzwerke (SNS) bieten eine neue Möglichkeit, vielfältiges Sozialverhalten zu erforschen. Dabei blieben berufliche SNS wie das deutsche Berufsnetzwerk „XING“ bisher in der Forschung weitestgehend unberücksichtigt, sodass es auch bislang noch keine validierten, testdiagnostischen Verfahren zur Erfassung der Motivation und Nutzung dies...
Poster
Full-text available
Soziale Netzwerke, wie Facebook, haben sich bezüglich ihrer Popularität und Nutzerzahlen in den letzten Dekaden stark vergrößert. Sie bieten vielfältige Möglichkeiten zur sozialen Interaktion und somit ein neues Feld der Sozialforschung. Dabei wurden bislang viele Studien durchgeführt, die bereits einige signifikante Korrelate nachweisen konnten (z...
Poster
Full-text available
Das Soziale Netzwerk Facebook bietet seinen Nutzern ein vielfältiges Spektrum an sozialen Aktivitäten und somit eine gute Möglichkeit, Sozialverhalten im Internet zu erforschen. Studien zeigen vielfältige Zusammenhänge zwischen Facebook und psychischen Einflussvariablen. Die Soziale Online-Selbstregulationstheorie (SOS-T) versucht diese vielfältige...
Presentation
Einerseits ist Materialismus prävalent, andererseits zeigt Forschung vor allem ungünstige Effekte. In einem selbstregulatorischen Ansatz werden Habenziele (materialistische Güter) von Seinszielen (nicht-materialistische Zustände) unterschieden, die beide sowohl durch Haben- als auch durch Seinsmittel erreicht werden können (Güter vs. nicht-material...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Social networking sites (SNSs), such as Facebook or Instagram, show a remarkable increase regarding their popularity over the last two decades, so that many studies tried to examine different motives for SNS use as well as repercussions to personality and different markers of psychological well-being. Studies show an abundance of correlations and interdependencies to personality (e.g., extraversion, neuroticism, narcissism, and materialism), and social psychological constructs (e.g., self-esteem, social comparison orientation, satisfaction with life) and figured out three basic motives, i.e., Need to Belong, Need to Self-Presentation, and Need to Social Comparison. However, despite these correlations, interdependencies, and motives, a superordinate theory is missing. The Social Online Self-regulation Theory (SOS-T) is a first approach to subsume all these different findings to self-regulation as one superordinate, latent variable for explaining SNS use. The SOS-T proposes that people use SNS in order to regulate their emotions, satisfy a variety of needs and motives, and to reach (consciously as well as unconsciously) an abundance of different personal goals.