Phillip Deery

Phillip Deery
Victoria University Melbourne | VU · College of Arts

About

40
Publications
1,747
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
128
Citations

Publications

Publications (40)
Article
Sir Raphael Cilento died on 16 April 1985 at the age of ninety‐two. The notice in the Canberra Times spoke of Cilento's “worldwide” reputation in tropical medicine, his contribution to the public health service in Queensland, and his role with the United Nations in the immediate post‐war years. In short, he was an “eminent son of Australia”. But Si...
Article
Because of its conviction that the Communist Party of Australia (CPA) was a subversive organisation whose members, meetings and policies needed close monitoring, the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO) intercepted telephone conversations, installed listening devices in offices, filmed and photographed Party members, and employed ag...
Article
The Cold War: A World History. By Odd Arne Westad (London: Allen Lane, 2017), pp. 710. £30.00.
Article
Full-text available
Daniel W. B. Lomas . Intelligence, Security and the Attlee Governments, 1945–51: An Uneasy Relationship? Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2017. Pp. 286. $110.00 (cloth). - Volume 57 Issue 1 - Phillip Deery
Article
Nguyen Cao Ky's trip to Australia in January 1967 was politically contentious and morally ambiguous. It threw a sharp spotlight on the vast deployment of state resources by a democratic government to protect a representative of a military junta. This article analyses, for the first time, Ky's visit. It will examine the circumstances, the preparatio...
Article
The efforts of the Liberal government led by John Gorton to acquire a locally built nuclear deterrent stretch back into the 1950s when Robert Menzies preferred to rely on the American or British nuclear umbrella for protection. Gorton took a different view and the advocates of an independent Australian nuclear capability rejoiced upon his elevation...
Article
Full-text available
For much of the twentieth century, branches of the New Theatre in Australia presented left-wing theatre within a culture that was resistant to their ideas. A novel mix of conventional theatre forms, experimental performative styles, agitational propaganda and Communist theories of ‘art as a weapon’ produced theatre that was responsive to internatio...
Article
Between the two world wars, the conservative parties dominated federal politics but Labor governments often ruled in the states. Since most key issues concerning Anzac commemoration occurred at state level, the result was that the Australian Labor Party (ALP) had little choice but to grapple with the emergent culture of Anzac commemoration. This ar...
Article
This paper questions the traditional view of the Australian-American relationship: that Australian dependency entailed unequivocal support for American foreign policy. It uses a particular Cold War event — the Cuban Missile Crisis — to examine the extent to which the reaction of the Australian government conformed to the general perception of immed...
Article
“It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they executed the Rosenbergs”, recalled Sylvia Plath in The Bell Jar. Others recalled this event differently: as legal murder and a flagrant miscarriage of justice. The electrocution of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg in June 1953, on a charge of conspiracy to commit espionage, was unprecedented in the history...
Article
The scholarship on the impact on communists of Khrushchev's “secret speech” to the twentieth Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union in 1956 is limited. Generally it is located within broader studies of organisational upheavals and ideological debates at the leadership level of communist parties. Rarely has there been analysis of the re...
Article
In July 1951 the overseas British Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) wrote to the internal British Security Service (MI5) seeking information about an American citizen living in London. The request was prefaced with a sentence that this essay seeks to explain: L. Adler cannot return to the United States with any hope of earning a living there, owing...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is an anatomy of an inquisition. It examines the Cold War persecution of Edwin Berry Burgum, a university professor and literary theorist. Whilst his professional competence was consistently applauded, his academic career was abruptly destroyed. His ‘fitness to teach’ was determined by his political beliefs: he was a member of the Americ...
Article
Professor Lyman Bradley was chairman of the German Department at New York University and an executive member of the Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee, listed by the US Attorney General as a subversive organisation. In 1951 he was fired and his long academic career ended. His dismissal, the first by the New York University on political grounds, r...
Article
This article examines the impact of the Twentieth Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union on the Communist Party of Australia (CPA). Specifically it focuses on the reverberations of Khrushchev's “secret speech” within the CPA leadership for the first six months of 1956. It argues that, in contrast to the received wisdom, the response of...
Article
Full-text available
In 1948 O. John Rogge, a prominent American liberal, was a contender for the Progressive Party's vice-presidential nomination. He was then a man of the Left: an activist in the international peace movement, a champion of radical causes and a defender of organizations deemed subversive by the Department of Justice. In 1951 he persuaded his client to...
Article
Full-text available
In the early 1950s the imminence and inevitability of a third world war was widely accepted. America had lost its atomic monopoly, Russia promoted itself as the defender of world peace against the war-mongering West and Korea had turned the Cold War hot. In Australia, the Menzies government prepared the country for combat while the fledgling peace...
Article
This article focuses primarily on Australian government responses to the 1952 Peace Conference for Asia and the Pacific Regions. Because the conference was to be held in Peking, it was the subject of immense controversy: Chinese communists were fighting Australian soldiers in Korea and Australian peace activists, most communist or 'fellow traveller...
Article
Although Cold War propaganda is now the subject of close scholarly scrutiny, the main method by which it was communicated - language - has been overlooked. The Malayan Emergency illustrates how the British government grappled with the issue of political terminology within the broader context of anti-communist propaganda. This article will analyse t...
Article
With the end of the Cold War and the further opening of archives, the role of Western communist parties and their relationship with the former Soviet Union has been the subject of fresh scrutiny. This article examines the conviction of the British Labour Government and its security services that the Communist Party of Great Britain represented, at...
Article
In 1950 the Cold War turned hot in Korea, the threat of atomic annihilation hovered menacingly and the spectre of another world war haunted Europe. The establishment of the World Peace Council that year was one response to these fears. In November 1950 the Council decided to hold a World Peace Congress in Sheffield. The British Labour government sa...
Article
The accepted historical view of British-Australian relations during the early Cold War emphasizes compliance, cooperation and dependency. Australia's acquiescence to British pressure to establish an effective security service and her readiness to permit British testing of atomic weapons on Australian soil are assumed to typify this close if subordi...
Article
The Cold War was a tough time for some scientists. Most stayed in the no-man's-land of political neutrality. Others bunkered down with the Left. A few went further and joined, openly, the Communist Party. This provided cold war warriors with abundant and usually lethal ammunition. This article examines the position of two Australian scientists whos...
Article
This article argues that the Attlee Labour government's depiction of communist influence within the trade union movement and, particularly, on the docks in the late 1940s, was neither as irrational nor deluded as many historians have alleged. When Attlee's response is understood within the context of Cold War developments, the Communist party emerg...
Article
When a young ALP Industrial Group leader was thrown from a ferry, allegedly by communists, into Sydney Harbour during bitter Cold War battles inside the labour movement, it was the culmination of an extraordinary career involving duplicity, mendacity and political intrigue. This article peers into one year, 1949, of the crowded life of William Thom...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)