Philipp Wolfgang Stockhammer

Philipp Wolfgang Stockhammer
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich | LMU · Institut für Vor- und Frühgeschichtliche und Provinzialrömische Archäologie

Professor

About

140
Publications
130,996
Reads
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2,805
Citations
Additional affiliations
December 2016 - present
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
Position
  • Managing Director
July 2016 - present
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich
Position
  • Professor
March 2015 - June 2016
Universität Heidelberg
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (140)
Article
Full-text available
Significance The bacterium Yersinia pestis has caused numerous historically documented outbreaks of plague and research using ancient DNA could demonstrate that it already affected human populations during the Neolithic. However, the pathogen’s genetic diversity, geographic spread, and transmission dynamics during this early period of Y. pestis evo...
Article
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This paper presents the earliest evidence for the exploitation of lignite (brown coal) in Europe and sheds new light on the use of combustion fuel sources in the 2nd millennium BCE Eastern Mediterranean. We applied Thermal Desorption/Pyrolysis–Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Polarizing Microscopy to the dental calculus of 67 individuals an...
Article
Although the first ancient DNA molecules were extracted more than three decades ago, the first ancient nuclear genomes could only be characterized after high-throughput sequencing was invented. Genome-scale data have now been gathered from thousands of ancient archaeological specimens, and the number of ancient biological tissues amenable to genome...
Article
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Domestication of horses fundamentally transformed long-range mobility and warfare¹. However, modern domesticated breeds do not descend from the earliest domestic horse lineage associated with archaeological evidence of bridling, milking and corralling2–4 at Botai, Central Asia around 3500 bc³. Other longstanding candidate regions for horse domestic...
Article
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We are a group of archaeologists, anthropologists, curators and geneticists representing diverse global communities and 31 countries. All of us met in a virtual workshop dedicated to ethics in ancient DNA research held in November 2020. There was widespread agreement that globally applicable ethical guidelines are needed, but that recent recommenda...
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Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been infecting humans for millennia and remains a global health problem, but its past diversity and dispersal routes are largely unknown. We generated HBV genomic data from 137 Eurasians and Native Americans dated between ~10,500 and ~400 years ago. We date the most recent common ancestor of all HBV lineages to between ~...
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Uniparentally-inherited markers on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the non-recombining regions of the Y chromosome (NRY), have been used for the past 30 years to investigate the history of humans from a maternal and paternal perspective. Researchers have preferred mtDNA due to its abundance in the cells, and comparatively high substitution rate. Conv...
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The Middle and Late Bronze Age, a period roughly spanning the 2nd millennium BC (ca. 2000-1200 BC) in the Near East, is frequently referred to as the first 'international age', characterized by intense and far-reaching contacts between different entities from the eastern Mediterranean to the Near East and beyond. In a large-scale tandem study of st...
Preprint
Full-text available
Uniparentally-inherited markers on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the non-recombining regions of the Y chromosome (NRY), have been used for the past 30 years to investigate the history of humans from a maternal and paternal perspective. Researchers have preferred mtDNA due to its abundance in the cells, and comparatively high substitution rate. Conv...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports on the MH II/III Burial Cluster II excavated at the MH acropolis of Aghios Ioannis in Boeotia, Greece. The burial ground comprises various funerary structures (tumulus, rectangular enclosure, cist graves) and provides evidence on primary and secondary mortuary treatment. The analysis is based on the remains of 22 individuals and...
Article
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Although the key role of long-distance trade in the transformation of cuisines worldwide has been well-documented since at least the Roman era, the prehistory of the Eurasian food trade is less visible. In order to shed light on the transformation of Eastern Mediterranean cuisines during the Bronze Age and Early Iron Age, we analyzed microremains a...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Middle and Late Bronze Age Near East, a period roughly spanning the second millennium BC (ca. 2000-1200 BC), is frequently referred to as the first ‘international age’, characterized by intense and far-reaching contacts between different entities from the eastern Mediterranean to the Near East and beyond. In a large-scale tandem study of stable...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
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Background: Recent advances in sequencing have facilitated large-scale analyses of the metagenomic composition of different samples, including the environmental microbiome of air, water, and soil, as well as the microbiome of living humans and other animals. Analyses of the microbiome of ancient human samples may provide insights into human health...
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Here, we report genome-wide data analyses from 110 ancient Near Eastern individuals spanning the Late Neolithic to Late Bronze Age, a period characterized by intense interregional interactions for the Near East. We find that 6 th millennium BCE populations of North/Central Anatolia and the Southern Caucasus shared mixed ancestry on a genetic cline...
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Genetic studies of Neolithic and Bronze Age skeletons from Europe have provided evidence for strong population genetic changes at the beginning and the end of the Neolithic period. To further understand the implications of these in Southern Central Europe, we analyze 96 ancient genomes from Switzerland, Southern Germany, and the Alsace region in Fr...
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It has been hypothesized that the Neolithic transition towards an agricultural and pastoralist economy facilitated the emergence of human-adapted pathogens. Here, we recovered eight Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica genomes from human skeletons of transitional foragers, pastoralists and agropastoralists in western Eurasia that were up to 6,500 yr...
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Dairy pastoralism is integral to contemporary and past lifeways on the eastern Eurasian steppe, facilitating survival in agriculturally challenging environments. While previous research has indicated that ruminant dairy pastoralism was practiced in the region by circa 1300 bc, the origin, extent and diversity of this custom remain poorly understood...
Article
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The Early Celtic site of the Heuneburg (Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany) has long been understood as a hallmark of early urbanization in Central Europe. The rich collection of Mediterranean imports recovered from the settlement, the elite burials in its surroundings and the Mediterranean-inspired mudbrick fortification wall further point to the importa...
Article
Revealing and understanding the mechanisms behind social inequality in prehistoric societies is a major challenge. By combining genome wide data, isotopic evidence as well as anthropological and archaeological data, we go beyond the dominating supra-regional approaches in archaeogenetics to shed light on the complexity of social status, inheritance...
Chapter
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Our excavations in the Southwestern Bulgarian mountains required that we should characterize the different settlements and spaces we have studied. In order to achieve a new under-standing of the spaces we study, we argue that the concept of space in world-systems perspectives is not compatible with a performative notion of space and does not do jus...
Article
In this paper a novel approach for quantifying matter fluxes into archaeological sites is presented. Using the case studies of two multilayered sites with occupations before, during, and after the Bronze Age (Arslantepe and Niederröblingen), one Bronze Age multilayered site (Fidvár by Vráble), and a trash deposit from a fourth (Bresto), the potenti...
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The ancient Mediterranean port city of Ashkelon, identified as “Philistine” during the Iron Age, underwent a marked cultural change between the Late Bronze and the early Iron Age. It has been long debated whether this change was driven by a substantial movement of people, possibly linked to a larger migration of the so-called “Sea Peoples.” Here, w...
Article
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The rich Mediterranean imports found in Early Celtic princely sites (7th-5th cent. BC) in Southwestern Germany, Switzerland and Eastern France have long been the focus of archaeological and public interest. Consumption practices, particularly in the context of feasting, played a major role in Early Celtic life and imported ceramic vessels have cons...
Article
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Four small ceramic juglets that had been used as containers for offerings in an elite Middle Bronze Age III (ca. 1650-1550 BCE) masonry tomb uncovered at Tel Megiddo in the Jezreel Valley, Israel were tested using organic residue analysis. Notably, residues of vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and acetonvanillone were identified in three of the four...
Article
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Anatolia was home to some of the earliest farming communities. It has been long debated whether a migration of farming groups introduced agriculture to central Anatolia. Here, we report the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer and from seven Anatolian and Levantine early farmers. We find high genetic continuity (~...
Article
The Late Bronze Age (ca. 1700/1600–1050 BCE) in the Aegean started with strong connections between societies in the region and beyond, and was accompanied by the collapse of palatial polities around 1200 BCE. The collapse led to unrest and migration in the East Mediterranean. In the present study, we focus on settlement contexts dating to the trans...
Chapter
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Die ersten Analysen organischer Rückstände an früheisenzeitlicher Keramik der Heuneburg fanden in den 1980er Jahren statt. Bereits damals wurden sowohl lokal hergestellte als auch importierte Gefäße für die Untersuchungen herangezogen. 2015‑2018 griff das vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) geförderte interdisziplinäre Verbundpro...
Chapter
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Zwischen 2015 und 2018 führte das vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (BMBF) geförderte interdisziplinäre Verbundprojekt „BEFIM - Bedeutungen und Funktionen mediterraner Importe im früheisenzeitlichen Mitteleuropa“ Analysen organischer Rückstände an Keramik prominenter früheisenzeitlicher Siedlungsplätze durch. Neben der Heuneburg bilde...
Book
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Volume 2 of the BEFIM series contains six papers by the BEFIM team and close co-operation partners. The interim reports of BEFIM 1 are enhanced, finalised, and integrated into overall interpretations. An introductory paper provides insights into and an overview of the potential of biomarker and isotopic analysis in studying ancient organic residues...
Book
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What the so-called “early Celts” used to drink has been a matter of debate amongst scientists and in the wider public for more than a century. Finds of Mediterranean imported pottery were the reason for scholars to suspect already at an early date that the “Celts” had aimed at imitating Mediterranean drinking habits. Until recently, these drinking...