Philipp Schorch

Philipp Schorch
Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich | LMU · Department of Cultural Studies and Archaeology

PhD

About

50
Publications
19,284
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
311
Citations
Citations since 2017
34 Research Items
230 Citations
201720182019202020212022202301020304050
201720182019202020212022202301020304050
201720182019202020212022202301020304050
201720182019202020212022202301020304050
Introduction
Philipp Schorch is Professor of Museum Anthropology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich, Germany, where he leads an ERC-funded research project on ‘Indigeneities in the 21st Century’. He is also an Honorary Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University, Australia. Philipp’s research focuses on museums, material culture/history/theory, contemporary art and (post)colonial histories, the Pacific and Europe, collaborations with Indigenous artists/curators/scholars, and (post)socialist environments.
Additional affiliations
April 2012 - October 2013
Deakin University
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (50)
Chapter
In which ways are environments (post-)socialist and how do they come about? How is the relationship between the built environment, memory, and debates on identity enacted? What are the spatial, material, visual, and aesthetic dimensions of these (post-)socialist enactments or interventions? And how do such (post-)socialist interventions in environm...
Chapter
In which ways are environments (post-)socialist and how do they come about? How is the relationship between the built environment, memory, and debates on identity enacted? What are the spatial, material, visual, and aesthetic dimensions of these (post-)socialist enactments or interventions? And how do such (post-)socialist interventions in environm...
Chapter
In which ways are environments (post-)socialist and how do they come about? How is the relationship between the built environment, memory, and debates on identity enacted? What are the spatial, material, visual, and aesthetic dimensions of these (post-)socialist enactments or interventions? And how do such (post-)socialist interventions in environm...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
This introduction lays out this special issue, which juxtaposes articles on approaches to provenance research, conducted at German museum and university institutions, with articles on past, present and future potentialities of restitutions to originating societies in Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia and Namibia. In doing so, the issue makes the argu...
Article
Full-text available
Um es auf den Punkt zu bringen: HistorikerInnen lesen und schreiben. ¹ Die Handwerkskunst dieser Profession zeichnet sich dadurch aus, basierend auf vornehmlich schriftlichen Quellen, Texte zu verfassen, die versuchen, sich an vergangene Zeiten anzunähern und den LeserInnen so Einblicke in andere Welten zu gewähren. Für viele HistorikerInnen bietet...
Article
Full-text available
This article introduces the art historical method of functional deixis into the study of material culture in anthropology. Functional deixis begins with a thorough empirical description of communicative effects—visual and embodied—produced by a material thing on the beholder. It then proceeds by tending to a kind of formalisation that enables us, o...
Chapter
Full-text available
As museums continue to change in the twenty-first century, the ‘figure of the curator’ is in flux. This introduction explores how curating globally is being (re)conceptualised through engagement with Indigenous people in the Pacific, and collections and exhibitions in Euro-American institutions. It provides an overview of this book, which brings to...
Chapter
This volume argues that curatorship may be ‘recalled’ and remade through collaborative relationships with communities leading to experiments in curatorial theory and practice. What can museums of ethnography in the Americas and Europe learn from the experience of nations where distinctive forms of Indigenous museology are emerging and reshaping the...
Chapter
Throughout the Pacific, interpersonal encounters are characterized by a deep level of physical intimacy and engagement - from the honi/hongi, the face-to-face greeting, to the ha‘a/haka wero, acts of challenge that also serve as a celebratory acknowledgement of ancestral presences. In these physical exchanges, relationships are built, tended, and t...
Article
What is the future of curatorial practice? How can the relationships between Indigenous people in the Pacific, collections in Euro-American institutions, and curatorial knowledge in museums globally be (re)conceptualised in reciprocal and symmetrical ways? Is there an ideal model, a ‘curatopia,’ whether in the form of a utopia or dystopia, which ca...
Chapter
The following conversation took place during the Critical Heritage Studies conference in Gothenburg, Sweden, on 6 June 2012. The initial idea and topic was suggested by Kylie Message, the session was chaired by Conal McCarthy, and the recording was transcribed by Jennifer Walklate and edited by Conal McCarthy and Jennifer Walklate. © 2019 selection...
Article
Full-text available
The introduction to this special issue draws attention to the conscious, creative and innovative actions of people when encountering new ideas, material objects or events like changes in the environment. The main argument is that critical situations and crisis make people reimagine their worlds, and how and when this is done is at the core of this...
Article
Full-text available
This article sets out to globalize Māori museology through mana taonga, a concept that is historically grounded and articulated in contemporary museum practice. Mana taonga can be used to reconceptualize issues of engagement, knowledge, and virtuality by exploring ways in which the mutual, asymmetrical relations underpinning global, scientific enta...
Chapter
Full-text available
We visited the Humboldt Lab in early July 2015, shortly after the conference Positioning Ethnological Museums in the 21st Century organ-ised by the Volkswagen Foundation in cooperation with Deutscher Museumsbund, which set out to discuss 'the need for a critical appraisal of the past, present, and future of ethnological museums', 1 as well as our o...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter engages with examples from the museum visitor studies literature that epitomize “the turn to understanding” by investigating the meaning-making processes of museum visitors through an analytical focus on encounters and engagements. The concept of narrative is introduced as a human meaning-making tool through which museum encounters can...
Article
Full-text available
Journal of Intercultural Studies Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information:
Article
Full-text available
The social agency of museums in countering prejudices and fostering respect for differences is increasingly recognised and empirical research has begun to illuminate the impacts of exhibitions devoted to ‘difficult’ subjects on audiences. This paper draws on an ongoing research project conducted by two Australian universities in collaboration with...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on a narrative study of Australian visitors to the Immigration Museum in Melbourne, this article explores the hermeneutic complexities of migration encounters through the meaning-making processes of museum visitors. Throughout this process of interpretive negotiations, museum exhibitions and visitor biographies become intertwined through na...
Article
Full-text available
Recent re-conceptualizations of the ‘public sphere’ facilitated a much needed shift in thinking about identity politics ‘from a substance … to a movement’ (Weibel and Latour, 2007). This laid the foundation for dissolving the ‘emanatist vision’ (Bourdieu, 1990) of self-explanatory and perpetual systems and structures towards the interrogation of ac...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on a long-term narrative study of global visitors to the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (Te Papa), this paper illuminates the experience of a museum space. It sheds light on the interpretive interplay between museological space, content and narrative throughout the construction of meanings by museum visitors. I argue that these spa...
Article
Full-text available
The conceptual understanding of museums as 'contact zones' has been widely appropriated in the museum literature and beyond. But the discussion lacks empirical insights into actual experiences: What does 'contact' mean for the person experiencing it? How is it lived, negotiated and contested? Drawing on a long-term narrative study of global visitor...
Article
Full-text available
Focus on Strangers: Photo Albums of World War II is based on a collaborative research project conducted by two German universities (Carl von Ossietzky Universitat Oldenburg and Friedrich Schiller Universitat Jena) and was conceptualized in cooperation with four German city museums in Oldenburg, Munich, Frankfurt, and Jena. While the exhibition cont...
Article
Full-text available
Cultural feelings are an undertheorised area of the human experience which are recently gaining attention and which need to be understood in the context of museum visitor studies where they are largely ignored. Drawing on a long-term narrative study of global visitors to the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (Te Papa), this paper unearths the...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I argue for a shift in conceptualising exhibitions: from products to be presented to processes to be revealed. I will explore how museum theory and practice are inextricably intertwined and can be brought into fruitful dialogue within an exhibition setting. By revealing the processes leading to the definition of categories and the int...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
for more info visit: https://www.indigen.eu/projects/affiliated-projects/archivalische-spuren-indigener-informant-innen
Project
We analyze how Rapa Nui has become a place of scientific interest and material appropriation. We will do so by paying particular attention to the collections preserved in ethnographic museums in Germany. The reconstruction of the profiles of collectors enables us to understand the complex network of relationships and interests that permitted the circulation of Rapanui materials. In a second step, we will facilitate access to the contemporary relationship of Rapanui people with their material productions of the past. We are interested in the discourses, practices, and emotions that these collections provoke anew among contemporary Rapanui artists. https://www.indigen.eu/projects/core-projects/recollecting-rapa-nui
Project
Finish the book and publish it in early 2018.