Philipp Horn

Philipp Horn
The University of Sheffield | Sheffield · Department of Urban Studies and Planning

PhD Planning, MA Development Studies, BA Politics

About

27
Publications
4,945
Reads
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231
Citations
Citations since 2016
20 Research Items
212 Citations
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Introduction
I'm a Lecturer in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the University of Sheffield. I have a BA in Politics and Economics from the University of Mannheim and an MA in Development Studies from the University of Manchester. My PhD focused on the role of indigenous rights in urban policies and planning in Bolivia and Ecuador. I completed my PhD in Planning at the University of Manchester in 2015. Prior to joining the University of Sheffield, I worked as a Research Associate at the Open University. My research interests centre around inclusive urban development planning in the global South, with a regional focus on Latin America. Within this broad agenda, I focus on two areas: (1) urban indigeneity and (2) participatory planning
Additional affiliations
February 2018 - present
The University of Sheffield
Position
  • Lecturer
February 2016 - January 2018
The Open University (UK)
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2011 - November 2015
The University of Manchester
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
Introducing "Indigenous Urbanisation in Latin America" Special Issue
Article
Full-text available
In Bolivia, urbanisation increasingly takes place in peri-urban settings situated outside the boundaries of cities. Unlike previous research that considers peri-urban developments such as rural-to-urban land use transitions to be characterised by state absence and little regulation and planning, this article demonstrates that such developments occu...
Research
Full-text available
Este documento de trabajo desarrolla una tipología de territorios en disputa con el objetivo de ofrecer una mirada más holística, interescalar e interdisciplinaria sobre los espacios, los actores, las relaciones y los procesos que determinan la emergencia, consolidación y transformación de los territorios. Los seis tipos o dimensiones examinados en...
Article
Full-text available
This article contrasts politico-legal understandings of indigeneity to the lived experiences of urban residents in Santa Cruz (Bolivia) who belong to distinct lowland indigenous groups and whose specific demands are often not addressed by government authorities. It also critically examines power relations and patterns of exclusion within urban indi...
Chapter
This chapter challenges politico-legal representations of indigeneity as static social category associated predominantly with rurality, ancestral lands, and traditions but not with cities and modern ways of living. By deploying a combined intra- and inter-categorical intersectionality approach and drawing on empirical research in two peri-urban nei...
Article
Full-text available
This working paper develops a typology of contested territories to offer a more holistic, interscalar, and interdisciplinary understanding of the spaces, actors, relationships, and processes that determine the emergence, consolidation, and transformation of specific territories. The six types or dimensions examined in this paper are: imagining, fig...
Article
Full-text available
Drawing on the Mukuru Special Planning Area in Nairobi (Kenya), this article analyses enabling conditions for scaling participatory planning in otherwise exclusionary urban political environments. It contributes to debates that focus on qualitative changes required to enhance citizen participation and on the integration of low-income residents’ nee...
Article
In 2015, as part of the University of Sheffield’s strategic commitment to innovation in its approaches to internationalization, as well as recognition of both the importance of student employability and growing opportunities in student-led research, the Faculty of Social Sciences established a unique learning and research initiative in the shape of...
Research
Full-text available
The purpose of this paper is to contribute to debates on inclusive informal settlement upgrading through scaling participatory planning, with a focus on the Mukuru Special Planning Area (SPA) in Nairobi, Kenya. Our contribution is threefold. First, we provide an overview of previous efforts at integrating participation into urban interventions that...
Article
The purpose of this paper is to contribute to debates on inclusive informal settlement upgrading through scaling participatory planning, with a focus on the Mukuru Special Planning Area (SPA) in Nairobi, Kenya. Our contribution is three-fold. First, we provide an overview of previous efforts at integrating participation into urban interventions tha...
Article
The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences—as academics and professionals—in coproducing knowledge to improve urban development outcomes in the global South. The focus of the paper is on urban research and practice, a field in which academic work influences policy and programming, and professional knowledge (validated and certified by ac...
Article
The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences – as academics and professionals – in co-producing knowledge to improve urban development outcomes in the Global South. The focus of the paper – urban research and practice – is a context in which academic work influences policy and programming, and professional knowledge – validated and certifi...
Article
Full-text available
The purpose of this paper is to share our experiences – as academics and professionals – in co-producing knowledge to improve urban development outcomes in the Global South. The focus of the paper – urban research and practice – is a context in which academic work influences policy and programming, and professional knowledge – validated and certifi...
Article
Full-text available
In this working paper we seek to contribute to debates about the scaling up of citizen participation in towns and cities of the Global South through a focus on participatory planning. Our contribution is threefold. First, we discuss existing experiences of integrating participation into citywide planning and urban governance processes, highlighting...
Article
Full-text available
The expansion of middle-income countries in the global South is now widely acknowledged as significant for international development research and practice. But, as yet, scholars have not fully considered how middle-income countries are responding to the new global goals on international development (the Sustainable Development Goals-SDGs) outlined...
Chapter
This chapter draws attention to processes that have, in recent decades, contributed to the almost complete urbanisation of previously isolated, rural indigenous peoples. Indigenous urbanisation trends are illustrated through the case study of Bolivia. Here, indigenous peoples inhabit diverse territories of concentrated and extended urbanisation whe...
Article
The historical construction of indigeneity as essentially rural policy category represents a key cause for the ongoing exclusion of urban indigenous peoples and blocks progress in delivering Agenda 2030 in Latin American cities. Even in Bolivia and Ecuador where urban indigeneity is recognised through constitutional reforms there are obstacles to t...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Research on planning for diverse and cosmopolitan cities often centres on case studies in the global north and fails to take into the account the complex challenges faced by ethnically diverse and divided cities in the global south. Interested in generating conceptual and practical ideas on 'planning for diversity' in the latter context, this paper...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis critically examines the role of indigeneity in urban policies and planning in a context of constitutional changes that have taken place in Bolivia and Ecuador in the recent decade. It departs from previous academic and policy research which mainly studied indigenous rights in rural areas and focused on urban indigenous peoples as outlaw...
Article
Current research on the impacts of the 2007 global economic crisis on international migration takes two different positions. Some studies emphasize the negative impacts while others are more positive. This article argues that these two positions offer simplistic interpretations which fail to take account of the complex micro-level realities that de...
Article
The United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are unlikely to be achieved by 2015, owing to conceptual flaws in their design as well as the structural and political constraints faced during implementation at the country level. While criticism of the MDGs is widespread, innovative ideas on addressing these operational challenges are still s...
Technical Report
Full-text available

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
In recent decades the world has experienced unprecedented urban growth. According to the United Nations 4 billion people, or 54% of the world’s population, lived in towns and cities in 2015. That number is expected to increase to 5 billion by 2030. Urban growth has outpaced the ability of many governments to build infrastructure and, in many towns and cities in the global South, provision for housing is inadequate. Consequently one in three urban dwellers live in informal settlements. Issues of insecure tenure, poor access to basic services, and insecure livelihoods are all prevalent. Although local government may have the desire to improve the situation they are, in many cases, under-capitalised and under-capacitated. Existing planning legislation and practices remain incapable of resolving such issues therefore local residents try and resolve these themselves. Their efforts are, however, fragmented and localised. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the resulting Sustainable Development Goals vow to end poverty, to achieve gender equality and ensure liveable cities. Multi-disciplinary approaches that build on local action and create strong partnerships are needed in order to advance initiatives and to address the UN Sustainable Development Goals to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all and to make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. This commitment to ‘leave no-one behind’ highlights the importance and strengthens the significance of citizen involvement in urban development. Academics seek to contribute to new solutions and approaches to problems faced by the residents in informal settlements. Universities have an important role in generating, analysing and monitoring data that can be used by policy makers. However this should be done in collaboration with local government, local residents and organisations. Citizen involvement and public participation in policy-making and programming should be nurtured and encouraged. Aims and objectives The network aims to develop the knowledge required to move from participatory community-led neighbourhood planning to city-scale planning processes. The aims and objectives of the project are critical to achieving inclusive urban futures, these include: Develop frameworks that build on effective approaches of community-led planning for informal settlement, upgrading at the neighbourhood level, and then scaling these to the city level. Locate these frameworks within traditions of alternative planning including participatory co-productive planning, participatory planning and action planning thus strengthening the critical mass of people-centred approaches supporting inclusive urban development. This component will elaborate why grassroots organisations make a substantive contribution to inclusive urban development and the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals. Develop a framework that enables the integration of community understandings and innovations with academic and professional knowledge. Achieving these objectives requires a combined effort from academics and civil society agencies. While academic researchers encourage civil society agencies to engage meaningfully and substantively, it is difficult to achieve this within academic research programmes. By creating a formal network the opportunity for engagement is created, to deliver on a set of shared objectives and to achieve the strengthening of relations between individuals and agencies. The network Professor Diana Mitlin, Managing Director of the Global Development Institute at The University of Manchester, is the project lead. Dr Philipp Horn, Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Manchester’s School of Education, Environment and Development and Postdoctoral Research Associate at The Open University, provides research support to the project. The network is a co-productive knowledge partnership between civil society action research agencies and academic departments. The project combines professionals and academics with a commitment to substantive change and experience at local level. This network is funded by the Leverhulme Trust. SDI-affiliated civil society alliances of organised groups of low-income residents are working in partnership with academic institutions. Their participatory efforts at neighbourhoods have been presented as best-practice examples in urban poverty reduction. These alliances are: Dialogue on Shelter Trust, Zimbabwe Slum Dwellers International Alliance, Kenya The network comprises committed partners that have been directly involved in previous participatory planning processes, these include: The University of Manchester (UK) The Faculty of Art Design and Architecture at the University of Johannesburg (South Africa) CURI at The University of Nairobi Faculty of the Built Environment at the National University of Science and Technology (Zimbabwe) Design Society Development DESIS Lab based at Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture (FADA), The University of Johannesburg 1to1 – Agency of Engagement All of these departments have a track record on urban development planning. The selected individuals within these departments have established connections with low-income communities, planners and urban professionals within their respective countries as well as sub-Saharan Africa. They have previously conducted practice relevant research around topics such as informal settlement upgrading, service provisioning and participatory community planning. See: https://www.gdi.manchester.ac.uk/research/groups/global-urban-futures/scaling-up-participation-in-urban-planning/ for all details.