Philip David Mannion

Philip David Mannion
Imperial College London | Imperial · Department of Earth Science and Engineering

About

168
Publications
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Publications

Publications (168)
Article
Full-text available
Today, warm-water coral reefs are limited to tropical-to-subtropical latitudes. These diverse ecosystems extended further poleward in the geological past, but the mechanisms driving these past distributions remain uncertain. Here, we test the role of climate and palaeogeo- graphy in shaping the distribution of coral reefs over geological timescales...
Chapter
Our understanding of sauropodomorph evolution is continually improved with the recognition of new species and their inclusion in phylogenetic data sets, along with the incorporation of novel characters. Whereas some subclades remain stable in terms of their original taxonomic content, the definitions of others have proven to be less easily applicab...
Article
Full-text available
Dinosaurs dominated Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems globally. However, whereas a pole-to-pole geographic distribution characterized ornithischians and theropods, sauropods were restricted to lower latitudes. Here, we evaluate the role of climate in shaping these biogeographic patterns through the Jurassic–Cretaceous (201–66 mya), combining dinosaur...
Preprint
Full-text available
Disentangling contributions from environmental variables is crucial for explaining global biodiversity patterns. We use wavelet power spectra to separate wavelength-dependent trends across Earth's surface. Spectra reveal scale- and location-dependent coherence between species richness and topography ( E ), annual precipitation ( Pn ), temperature (...
Article
Full-text available
Hudiesaurus sinojapanorum is a Late Jurassic sauropod from northwestern China that was erected on the basis of a cervicodorsal vertebra, four teeth, and a nearly complete forelimb. However, re-evaluation of this material, and comparisons with other taxa, indicate that there are few grounds for regarding these specimens as congeneric. Consequently,...
Article
Full-text available
Notosuchians are an extinct clade of terrestrial crocodyliforms with a particularly rich record in the late Early to Late Cretaceous (approx. 130–66 Ma) of Gondwana. Although much of this diversity comes from South America, Africa and Indo-Madagascar have also yielded numerous notosuchian remains. Three notosuchian species are currently recognized...
Article
Full-text available
First appearing in the latest Cretaceous, Crocodylia is a clade of semi-aquatic, predatory reptiles, defined by the last common ancestor of extant alligators, caimans, crocodiles, and gharials. Despite large strides in resolving crocodylian interrelationships over the last three decades, several outstanding problems persist in crocodylian systemati...
Article
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Sauropod dinosaurs were an abundant and diverse component of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation of the USA, with 24 currently recognized species. However, some authors consider this high diversity to have been ecologically unviable and the validity of some species has been questioned, with suggestions that they represent growth series (ontogimor...
Article
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It has often been suggested that the productivity of an ecosystem affects the number of species that it can support. Despite decades of study, the nature, extent, and underlying mechanisms of this relationship are unclear. One suggested mechanism is the “more individuals” hypothesis (MIH). This proposes that productivity controls the number of indi...
Article
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There is significant geographic variation in species richness. However, the nature of the underlying relationships, such as that between species richness and environmental stability, remains unclear. The stability-time hypothesis suggests that environmental instability reduces species richness by suppressing speciation and increasing extinction ris...
Article
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The latitudinal biodiversity gradient (LBG), in which species richness decreases from tropical to polar regions, is a pervasive pattern of the modern biosphere. Although the distribution of fossil occurrences suggests this pattern has varied through deep time, the recognition of palaeobiogeographic patterns is hampered by geological and anthropogen...
Article
Mammals are the only surviving group of Cynodontia, a synapsid clade that first appeared in the fossil record in the late Permian, ~260 million years ago. Using three metrics that capture skeletal completeness, we quantify the quality of the early cynodont fossil record in time and space to evaluate the impact of sampling and preservational biases...
Article
The titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur Diamantinasaurus matildae is represented by two individuals from the Cenomanian-lower Turonian 'upper' Winton Formation of central Queensland, northeastern Australia. The type specimen has been described in detail, whereas the referred specimen, which includes several elements not present in the type series (part...
Article
Full-text available
Dinosaur remains were discovered in the 1860’s in the Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) Reuchenette Formation of Moutier, northwestern Switzerland. In the 1920’s, these were identified as a new species of sauropod, Ornithopsis greppini, before being reclassified as a species of Cetiosauriscus (C. greppini), otherwise known from the type species (C. stew...
Article
The titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur Savannasaurus elliottorum is represented by a partial postcranial skeleton from the lower Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian-lowermost Turonian) Winton Formation of Queensland, northeast Australia. Here, we present a detailed description of this specimen, as well as an emended diagnosis for this titanosaur. Savannasaur...
Article
Full-text available
Spatiotemporal changes in fossil specimen completeness can bias our understanding of a group's evolutionary history. The quality of the sauropodomorph fossil record was assessed a decade ago, but the number of valid species has since increased by 60%, and 17% of the taxa from that study have since undergone taxonomic revision. Here, we assess how 1...
Article
Full-text available
The Cretaceous/Paleogene mass extinction, 66 Ma, included the demise of non-avian dinosaurs. Intense debate has focused on the relative roles of Deccan volcanism and the Chicxulub asteroid impact as kill mechanisms for this event. Here, we combine fossil-occurrence data with paleoclimate and habitat suitability models to evaluate dinosaur habitabil...
Article
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There is no consensus about how terrestrial biodiversity was assembled through deep time, and in particular whether it has risen exponentially over the Phanerozoic. Using a database of 60 859 fossil occurrences, we show that the spatial extent of the worldwide terrestrial tetrapod fossil record itself expands exponentially through the Phanerozoic....
Presentation
Modern zooxanthellate coral (Z-coral) biodiversity decreases from tropical to polar regions. This latitudinal biodiversity gradient (LBG) is remarkably pervasive across numerous extant taxonomic groups. However, projected global warming of 2.0–4.8°C will have profound impacts on the distribution of organisms’ abundance, diversity, and habitats, as...
Article
Full-text available
Titanosaurs were a globally distributed clade of Cretaceous sauropods. Historically regarded as a primarily Gondwanan radiation, there is a growing number of Eurasian taxa, with several putative titanosaurs contemporaneous with, or even pre-dating, the oldest known Southern Hemisphere remains. The early Late Cretaceous Jinhua Formation, in Zhejiang...
Article
Full-text available
Reef corals are currently undergoing climatically driven poleward range expansions, with some evidence for equatorial range retractions. Predicting their response to future climate scenarios is critical to their conservation, but ecological models are based only on short-term observations. The fossil record provides the only empirical evidence for...
Article
Full-text available
We examine how the history of Phanerozoic marine biodiversity relates to environmental change. Our focus is on North America, which has a relatively densely sampled history. By transforming time series into the time-frequency domain using wavelets, histories of biodiversity are shown to be similar to sea level, temperature and oceanic chemistry at...
Article
Full-text available
The fossil record provides one of the strongest tests of the hypothesis that diversity within local communities is constrained over geological timescales. Constraints to diversity are particularly controversial in modern terrestrial ecosystems, yet long-term patterns are poorly understood. Here we document patterns of local richness in Phanerozoic...
Article
Full-text available
In the lead-up to the Cretaceous/Paleogene mass extinction, dinosaur diversity is argued to have been either in long-term decline, or thriving until their sudden demise. The latest Cretaceous (Campanian–Maastrichtian [83–66 Ma]) of North America provides the best record to address this debate, but even here diversity reconstructions are biased by u...
Article
The 24 extant crocodylian species are the remnants of a once much more diverse and widespread clade. Crocodylomorpha has an approximately 230 million year evolutionary history, punctuated by a series of radiations and extinctions. However, the group's fossil record is biased. Previous studies have reconstructed temporal patterns in subsampled croco...
Article
The Late Jurassic Tendaguru Formation of Tanzania, southeastern Africa, records a rich sauropod fauna, including the diplodocoids Dicraeosaurus and Tornieria, and the brachiosaurid titanosauriform Giraffatitan. However, the taxonomic affinities of other sympatric sauropod taxa are poorly understood. Here, we critically reassess and redescribe these...
Article
Full-text available
The Jurassic/Cretaceous (J/K) boundary, 145 million years ago, has long been recognised as an extinction event or faunal turnover for sauropod dinosaurs, with many ‘basal’ lineages disappearing. However, recently, a number of ‘extinct’ groups have been recognised in the Early Cretaceous, including diplodocids in Gondwana, and non-titanosauriform ma...
Poster
Conservation biologists use ecological niche models (ENMs) to estimate the impact of climate change on species’ distributions. This approach attempts to establish the fundamental niche of a species. However, most ENMs are calibrated solely on modern occurrences, which are intrinsically biased/incomplete in geographic and environmental space. Such E...
Article
Full-text available
The titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur Mendozasaurus neguyelap is represented by several partial skeletons from a single locality within the Coniacian (lower Upper Cretaceous) Sierra Barrosa Formation in the south of Mendoza Province, northern Neuquén Basin, Argentina. A detailed revision of Mendozasaurus, including previously undocumented remains fro...
Article
Full-text available
The fragmentation of the supercontinent Pangaea has been suggested to have had a profound impact on Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate distributions. One current paradigm is that geographic isolation produced an endemic biota in East Asia during the Jurassic, while simultaneously preventing diplodocoid sauropod dinosaurs and several other tetrapod gro...
Preprint
The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous interval represents a time of environmental upheaval and cataclysmic events, combined with disruptions to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Historically, the Jurassic/Cretaceous (J/K) boundary was classified as one of eight mass extinctions. However, more recent research has largely overturned this view, revea...
Preprint
Atoposaurid crocodyliforms represent an important faunal component of Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Laurasian semi-aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems, with numerous spatiotemporally contemporaneous atoposaurids known from western Europe. In particular, the Late Jurassic of France and Germany records evidence for high diversity and possible sympa...
Preprint
Crocodyliforms have a much richer evolutionary history than represented by their extant descendants, including several independent marine and terrestrial radiations during the Mesozoic. However, heterogeneous sampling of their fossil record has obscured their macroevolutionary dynamics, and obfuscated attempts to reconcile external drivers of these...
Preprint
Reconstructing deep time trends in biodiversity remains a central goal for palaeobiologists, but our understanding of the magnitude and tempo of extinctions and radiations is confounded by uneven sampling of the fossil record. In particular, the Jurassic/Cretaceous (J/K) boundary, 145 million years ago, remains a poorly understood interval, despite...
Preprint
Atoposaurids are a group of small-bodied, extinct crocodyliforms, regarded as an important component of Jurassic and Cretaceous Laurasian semi-aquatic ecosystems. Despite the group being known for over 150 years, the taxonomic composition of Atoposauridae and its position within Crocodyliformes are unresolved. Uncertainty revolves around their plac...
Article
Poropat, S.F., Nair, J.P., Syme, C.E., Mannion, P.D., Upchurch, P., Hocknull, S.A., Cook, A.G., Tischler, T.R. & Holland, T. XX.XXXX. 2017. Reappraisal of Austrosaurus mckillopi Longman, 1933 Longman, H.A., 1933. A new dinosaur from the Queensland Cretaceous. Memoirs of the Queensland Museum 10, 131–144. [Google Scholar] from the Allaru Mudstone of...
Data
Palaeogeography of the carbonated Jura platform during the upper Oxfordian–lower Kimmeridgian Map modified after Cariou (2013). Abbreviated locations for: (1) truncations: O, Ornans (Enay, Contini & Boullier, 1988), BP, Bonnevaux-le-Prieuré (Lathuiliere et al., 2005), Damparis (this study); and (2) fossil woods: BC, Besançon (Citadelle) (Bulle et a...
Data
Geological correlation scheme Correlation scheme of the lithological units of Damparis with both synthetic geological successions of Franche-Comté region and of north-western Switzerland.
Data
Biostratigraphical distinction of the geological formations from the late Middle and Upper Oxfordian in Franche-Comté (France) Taxon names and stratigraphical ranges have been updated from original publications and different sources respectively. Only two taxa (highlighted in yellow) are still affected by taxonomic vs. stratigraphic inconsistencies...
Data
Data matrix (TNT and Mesquite)
Article
Full-text available
Brachiosauridae is a clade of titanosauriform sauropod dinosaurs that includes the well-known Late Jurassic taxa Brachiosaurus and Giraffatitan. However, there is disagreement over the brachiosaurid affinities of most other taxa, and little consensus regarding the clade’s composition or inter-relationships. An unnamed partial sauropod skeleton was...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Titanosauriforms represent the most diverse clade of sauropod dinosaurs, with >120 species, a global distribution, and a Late Jurassic to end-Cretaceous temporal range. Interrelationships of this clade are poorly understood, especially for derived titanosaurs; however, a wealth of new data provides an opportunity to remedy this problem. Based on fi...
Article
Full-text available
The Early Jurassic of China has long been recognized for its diverse array of sauropodomorph dinosaurs. However, the contribution of this record to our understanding of early sauropod evolution is complicated by a dearth of information on important transitional taxa. We present a revision of the poorly known taxon Sanpasaurus yaoi Young, 1944 from...
Article
Full-text available
Australian dinosaurs have played a rare but controversial role in the debate surrounding the effect of Gondwanan break-up on Cretaceous dinosaur distribution. Major spatiotemporal gaps in the Gondwanan Cretaceous fossil record, coupled with taxon incompleteness, have hindered research on this effect, especially in Australia. Here we report on two n...