Phil Bouchet

Phil Bouchet
University of St Andrews · Centre for Research into Ecological & Environmental Modelling

PhD

About

50
Publications
34,419
Reads
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1,192
Citations
Introduction
Phil Bouchet currently works at the Centre for Research into Ecological & Environmental Modelling at the University of St Andrews. Phil does research in Marine Biology, Conservation Ecology and Biostatistics.
Additional affiliations
September 2018 - present
Bangor University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
June 2015 - August 2018
University of Western Australia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
February 2012 - July 2012
University of Western Australia
Position
  • Introduction to Scientific Practices
Description
  • Tutor for 1st year university module in science communication
Education
March 2011 - March 2014
University of Western Australia
Field of study
  • Spatial Modelling and Marine Predator Ecology
September 2008 - August 2009
University of St Andrews
Field of study
  • Marine Mammal Science
September 2006 - August 2007
Université de Bretagne Occidentale
Field of study
  • Marine and Coastal Sciences

Publications

Publications (50)
Article
After decades of extensive surveying, knowledge of the global distribution of species still remains inadequate for many purposes. In the short to medium term, such knowledge is unlikely to improve greatly given the often prohibitive costs of surveying and the typically limited resources available. 2.By forecasting biodiversity patterns in time and...
Article
Full-text available
Predictive models are central to many scientific disciplines and vital for informing management in a rapidly changing world. However, limited understanding of the accuracy and precision of models transferred to novel conditions (their ‘transferability’) undermines confidence in their predictions. Here, 50 experts identified priority knowledge gaps...
Article
Full-text available
Forecasting the responses of biodiversity to global change has never been more important. However, many ecologists faced with limited sample sizes and shoestring budgets often resort to extrapolating predictive models beyond the range of their data to support management actions in data‐deficient contexts. This can lead to error‐prone inference that...
Article
Full-text available
Species distribution models (SDMs) constitute the most common class of models across ecology, evolution and conservation. The advent of ready-to-use software packages and increasing availability of digital geoinformation have considerably assisted the application of SDMs in the past decade, greatly enabling their broader use for informing conservat...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Density surface models (DSMs) are clearly established as a method of choice for the analysis of cetacean line transect survey data, and are increasingly used to inform risk assessments in remote marine areas subject to rising anthropogenic impacts (e.g. the high seas). However, despite persistent skepticism about the validity of extrapolated models...
Article
Full-text available
Maritime traffic is increasing globally, with a four-fold increase in commercial vessel movements between 1992 and 2012. Vessels contribute to noise and air pollution, provide pathways for non-native species, and collide with marine wildlife. While knowledge of shipping trends and potential environmental impacts exists at both local and global leve...
Article
Full-text available
Concerns over cetacean mortality events coincident with maritime warfare exercises have motivated efforts to characterize the effects of anthropogenic noise on free-ranging whales and dolphins. By monitoring the movement, diving, and acoustic behaviors of individual whales before, during, and after sound exposure, behavioral response studies (BRSs)...
Article
Full-text available
Seascape ecology, the marine-centric counterpart to landscape ecology, is rapidly emerging as an interdisciplinary and spatially explicit ecological science with relevance to marine management, biodiversity conservation and restoration. While important progress in this field has been made in the past decade, there has been no coherent prioritisatio...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract In coastal systems, marine‐protected areas (MPAs) have been shown to increase the diversity, abundance, and biomass of wildlife assemblages as well as their resilience to climate change. The effectiveness of pelagic MPAs is less clear, with arguments against their establishment typically based on the highly mobile nature of pelagic taxa. W...
Article
Full-text available
Implementing conservation measures for data-limited species is a fundamental challenge for wildlife managers and policy-makers, and proves difficult for cryptic marine animals occurring in naturally low numbers across remote seascapes. There is currently scant information on the abundance and habitat preferences of Australian snubfin dolphins (Orca...
Article
Full-text available
Species distribution models (SDMs) constitute the most common class of models across ecology, evolution and conservation. The advent of ready‐to‐use software packages and increasing availability of digital geoinformation have considerably assisted the application of SDMs in the past decade, greatly enabling their broader use for informing conservat...
Article
Full-text available
1. Baited remote underwater stereo‐video systems (stereo‐BRUVs) are a popular tool to sample demersal fish assemblages and gather data on their relative abundance and body‐size structure in a robust, cost‐effective, and non‐invasive manner. Given the rapid uptake of the method, subtle differences have emerged in the way stereo‐BRUVs are deployed an...
Article
Full-text available
The conservation of marine biodiversity is firmly embedded in national and international policy frameworks. However, the difficulties associated with conducting broad-scale surveys of oceanic environments restrict the evidence base available for applied management in pelagic waters. For example, the Oceanic Shoals Australian Marine Park (AMP) was e...
Article
Full-text available
Cetaceans are iconic predators that serve as important indicators of marine ecosystem health. The Bremer Sub-Basin, south-western Australia, supports a diverse cetacean community including the largest documented aggregation of killer whales (Orcinus orca) in Australian waters. Knowledge of cetacean distributions is critical for managing the area’s...
Article
Full-text available
Here we describe the first underwater sighting of Shepherd’s beaked whale (Tasmacetus shepherdi). Two individuals were observed together on video footage obtained via mid-water stereo-Baited Remote Underwater Video Systems(BRUVS) deployed off the coast of Inaccessible Island, Tristan da Cunha, in the South Atlantic. This observation constitutes the...
Article
Full-text available
Since the 1950s, industrial fisheries have expanded globally, as fishing vessels are required to travel further afield for fishing opportunities. Technological advancements and fishery subsidies have granted ever-increasing access to populations of sharks, tunas, billfishes, and other predators. Wilderness refuges, defined here as areas beyond the...
Article
Climate change is leading to an increase of mean sea surface temperatures and extreme heat events. There is an urgent need to better understand the capabilities of marine macroalgae to adapt to these rapid changes. In this study, the responses of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification to elevated temperature in a global warming scenario wer...
Preprint
Full-text available
Model transferability is an emerging and important branch of predictive science that has grown primarily from a need to produce ecological forecasts in the face of widespread data deficiency and escalating environmental novelty. In our recent article in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, we outlined some of the major roadblocks that currently undermi...
Preprint
Full-text available
This report aims to compare recent population estimates of southern hemisphere breeding stock D humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) based on data collected at two key locations along the Western Australian coastline, namely North West Cape (NWC) and Shark Bay, ~400 km south of NWC. The report additionally investigates the efficacy and practica...
Article
Full-text available
Model transferability is an emerging and important branch of predictive science that has grown primarily from a need to produce ecological forecasts in the face of widespread data deficiency and escalating environmental novelty. In our recent article in Trends in Ecology and Evolution, we outlined some of the major roadblocks that currently under-...
Preprint
Full-text available
Estimates of the abundance of Breeding Stock D humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are key to the conservation and management of what is thought to be one of the largest populations of the species. Five years (2000, 2001, 2006, 2007 and 2008) of aerial surveys carried out over an eight-year period at North West Cape (Western Australia) using l...
Article
Full-text available
One of the main challenges in assessing marine biodiversity is the lack of consistent approaches to monitor it. This threatens to undermine ocean best practice in marine monitoring, as it impedes a reduction in the bias and variance of sampled data and restricts the confidence in the advice that can be given. In particular, there is potential for c...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Australia’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is the third largest maritime territory in the world. Monitoring its dynamics is fundamental to understanding and reporting on how the ocean is responding to human pressures and global environmental change. Increasingly stringent conservation budgets, however, are placing a strong emphasis on strategic reso...
Chapter
Full-text available
With over 70 contributors from 30 agencies, the NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub has developed a suite of field manuals to describe a nationally consistent and defensible approach to marine data acquisition. This manual relates to pelagic (mid-water) BRUVS, i.e. gear designed to acquire digital video imagery of macro-organisms living in the ocean’s w...
Chapter
Full-text available
With over 70 contributors from 30 agencies, the NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub has developed a suite of field manuals to describe a nationally consistent and defensible approach to marine data acquisition. This manual relates to benthic BRUVS, i.e. gear designed to acquire imagery of demersal fish assemblages and their habitat within the field of vie...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Cetaceans are some of the most iconic animals on the planet, yet few of the 45 species of whales, dolphins and porpoises known to occur in Australian waters have been extensively studied to date. Historical commercial whaling records and recent modelling studies suggest that the submarine canyons within and around the Bremer Marine Park provide fav...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Approximately 70 kilometres south-east of Bremer Bay (119.4°E, 34.4°S) off southern Western Australia’s coast lies a group of submarine canyons that incise the continental slope, plunging to depths of more than 1,000 metres. Charismatic pelagic organisms such as cetaceans, sharks, seabirds and squid are known to concentrate in high abundance above...
Book
Full-text available
Australia has one of the world’s largest marine estates that includes many vulnerable habitats and a high biodiversity, with many endemic species crossing a wide latitudinal range. The marine estate is used by a variety of industries including fishing, oil & gas, and shipping, in addition to traditional, cultural, scientific and recreational uses....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Following the establishment of the world’s largest network of marine protected areas, Australia is now tasked with implementing national plans to manage a huge range of marine environments, from tropical to sub-Antarctic climates and shallow reef to abyssal depths. Monitoring (i.e. condition assessment and trend detection) is one of the key objecti...
Preprint
Following the establishment of the world’s largest network of marine protected areas, Australia is now tasked with implementing national plans to manage a huge range of marine environments, from tropical to sub-Antarctic climates and shallow reef to abyssal depths. Monitoring (i.e. condition assessment and trend detection) is one of the key objecti...
Article
Tuna, billfish, and oceanic sharks [hereafter referred to as 'mobile oceanic fishes and sharks' (MOFS)] are characterised by conservative life-history strategies and highly migratory behaviour across large, transnational ranges. Intense exploitation over the past 65 years by a rapidly expanding high-seas fishing fleet has left many populations depl...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Protected areas have become pivotal to the modern conservation planning toolbox, but a limited understanding of marine macroecology is hampering their efficient design and implementation in pelagic environments. We explored the respective contributions of environmental factors and human impacts in capturing the distribution of an assemblage of...
Article
Full-text available
The incidental capture of wildlife in fishing gear presents a global conservation challenge. As a baseline to inform assessments of the impact of bycatch on bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) interacting with an Australian trawl fishery, we conducted an aerial survey to estimate dolphin abundance across the fishery. Concurrently, we carried o...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Effective management of marine assets requires an understanding of ecosystems and the processes that influence patterns of biodiversity. Project D1 of the NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub has been collating and synthesising existing data through 2015/16, focusing on Commonwealth Marine Reserves (CMRs, now Australian Marine Parks AMPs) and Key Ecologica...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Minister for Environment and Energy, the Honourable Josh Frydenberg, committed research funds to assess the extent and likely drivers of a megafauna aggregation that is currently the focus of tourism activities south of Bremer Bay, Western Australia. Present at this location is a predictable aggregation of killer whales (Orcinus orca) amongst o...
Technical Report
Full-text available
A scientific workshop for NESP Project D1 ‘Developing a toolbox of predictive models for the monitoring and management of KEFs and CMRs in the North and North-west regions’ was held at Geoscience Australia 9-10 September 2015. The objectives of the workshop were to discuss future research priorities for the North and North-West regions and to defin...
Article
Full-text available
We present a novel system of drifting pelagic baited stereo-video cameras that operate in deep-water, topographically complex environments typically considered inaccessible for sampling. The instruments are portable, semi-autonomous and inexpensive, allowing the recording of high-definition video footage in near-real time and over broad stretches o...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This guide has been developed for policy makers and managers to communicate the key findings of the three recent surveys of the Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve, and its relevance to decision making and management. The document is a synthesis designed to transfer relevant knowledge from scientists to managers and decision makers and will...
Article
Full-text available
Limited resources and increasing environmental concerns have prompted calls to identify the critical questions that most need to be answered to advance conservation, thereby providing an agenda for scientific research priorities. Cetaceans are often keystone indicator species but also high profile, charismatic flagship taxa that capture public and...
Article
Full-text available
Despite being identified as a driver of mobile predator aggregations (hotspots) in both marine and terrestrial environments, topographic complexity has long remained a challenging concept for scientists to visualise and a difficult parameter to estimate. It is only with the advent of high-speed computers and the recent popularisation of geographica...
Article
In the open ocean, the movements and habitat use of large mobile predators are driven by dynamic interactions between biological and physical variables and complex predator–prey relationships. Understanding the spatial and temporal distributions of pelagic fishes and sharks is a critical component of conservation and fisheries management. Here, we...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Coastal southwestern Australia is used by several whale species for migrating, resting, and/or calving each year. Four of these (blue, humpback, southern right and minke whales) are currently listed as vulnerable or endangered due to prior over-exploitation by commercial whaling. The Southwest Whale Ecology Study (SouWEST), established in 2010, is...
Article
Full-text available
Estimates of the abundance of Breeding Stock D humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) are key to the conservation and management of what is thought to be one of the largest populations of the species. Five years (2000, 2001, 2006, 2007 and 2008) of aerial surveys carried out over an eight-year period at North West Cape (Western Australia) using l...
Conference Paper
A detailed behavioural study of baleen whales was conducted in Geographe Bay (Western Australia, 115 °E, 33° S) between November 4th and December 12th, 2010 using theodolite tracking (from an elevation of 52m) to document: (1) whale species present in Geographe Bay, and (2) how whales use the Bay. Noise was simultaneously logged to capture whale vo...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hi all,
Does anyone know of any publication(s) where multiple wildlife data sources were combined and weighted differently in a quantitative analysis of animal distribution, abundance, or other parameter?
I am interested in integrating data from both (1) dedicated surveys where effort levels are known and (2) from opportunistic contributions (e.g. citizen science projects) where effort is not necessarily quantified. I would like downweigh the influence of the latter where sightings are more likely subject to observer bias, species misidentification etc. but would like to avoid having to choose arbitrary weight values if possible.
Any thoughts?
Thanks in advance!

Projects

Projects (7)
Project
Cetaceans can be challenging to observe at sea, due to their wide-ranging nature and the fact they spend 95% of their time beneath the surface. Therefore, researchers use a variety of methods to study their occurrence, behaviour, and health. For example, the use of photographic-identification (photo-ID), passive acoustic monitoring (PAM), and citizen science observations. The aim of these projects is to examine cetacean ecology, in terms of animal occurrence, behaviour and health.
Project
Predictive models are vital for informing conservation and natural resource management in a rapidly changing world, but ecological knowledge is often limited, sporadic, or inadequate to support robust inference. Projecting (transferring) models developed in data-rich regions/systems to data-poor ones offers an appealing solution to pervasive data deficiencies, but the validity and performance of transferred models are seldom assessed under different conditions, such that the determinants of ecological predictability therefore remain insufficiently understood. Goal: This project captures efforts to identify ways of improving the practice of model transfers in ecology, by better understanding the factors leading to accurate/precise predictions in novel conditions.
Project
Australia has one of the world’s largest marine estates and boasts areas of high biodiversity and endemism. It is also subject to a wide variety of commercial, cultural, scientific and recreational uses. Monitoring the impacts of these uses is a massive shared responsibility that can only be achieved by making the best use of all the information that is collected. We have established several standardised approaches to ensure that data are directly comparable in time and through space, thus supporting nationally relevant monitoring in Australian waters, including the Australian Marine Park network. We have developed marine survey design packages and a suite of field manuals for the acquisition of marine biological data from frequently-used sampling platforms (multibeam, AUV, BRUV, towed imagery, sled/trawl, grab/box core). Our objective integrates with one of the eight high-level priorities identified by the National Marine Science Plan (2015-25): the establishment of national baselines and long-term monitoring.