Phatthanakit Chobthamkit

Phatthanakit Chobthamkit
Thammasat University · Department of Psychology

PhD (Psychology)
Open for potential cross-cultural research collaboration

About

38
Publications
51,036
Reads
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621
Citations
Introduction
I am Assistant Professor of social psychology at Thammasat University, Thailand. I am always open for collaboration in cross-cultural research projects from all over the world. My site is https://sites.google.com/site/phatthanakitchobthamkit
Additional affiliations
September 2016 - present
University of Kent
Position
  • PhD Student
August 2016 - present
Thammasat University
Position
  • Professor
July 2011 - August 2016
Thammasat University
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
September 2016 - September 2020
University of Kent
Field of study
  • Psychology
October 2009 - August 2010
University of Sussex
Field of study
  • Applied Social Psychology
June 2004 - March 2008
Thammasat University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Legal law is a type of social norm, which is tremendously important, because it encourages the feeling of safety in society. However, legal process may sometimes lead to wrong verdicts. In case of “scapegoats”, the penalty may cause extreme loss to the scapegoats and their families. Some of them may lose their lives during the punishment due to the...
Article
Full-text available
Markus and Kitayama's (1991) theory of independent and interdependent self-construals had a major influence on social, personality, and developmental psychology by highlighting the role of culture in psychological processes. However, research has relied excessively on contrasts between North American and East Asian samples, and commonly used self-r...
Article
Full-text available
Variations in acquiescence and extremity pose substantial threats to the validity of cross-cultural research that relies on survey methods. Individual and cultural correlates of response styles when using 2 contrasting types of response mode were investigated, drawing on data from 55 cultural groups across 33 nations. Using 7 dimensions of self-oth...
Article
Previous two-nation comparisons have provided evidence that self-efficacy may be a protective factor against depression in individualist cultures, whereas relationship harmony may be a stronger protective factor in collectivist cultures. However, wider sampling and more specific measures of cultural difference are required to test these conclusions...
Article
Most research on the development of personality traits like the Dark Triad (i.e., narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy) focuses on local effects like parenting style or attachment, but people live in a larger society that may set the stage for any local effects. Here we paired nation-level data on the traits from 49 nations with several mi...
Article
Full-text available
The belief in a just world (BJW) is the belief that people get what they deserve and deserve what they get. The theory and research findings suggest that believing the world is fair to “me” (personal BJW or PBJW) is associated with positive psychological functioning, whereas believing that the world is fair to people in general (general BJW or GBJW...
Article
Anxiety associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and home confinement has been associated with adverse health behaviors, such as unhealthy eating, smoking, and drinking. However, most studies have been limited by regional sampling, which precludes the examination of behavioral consequences associated with the pandemic at a global level. Further, few s...
Article
Full-text available
The present paper examines longitudinally how subjective perceptions about COVID-19, one’s community, and the government predict adherence to public health measures to reduce the spread of the virus. Using an international survey ( N = 3040), we test how infection risk perception, trust in the governmental response and communications about COVID-19...
Article
Full-text available
COVID-19 has been a source of fear around the world. We asked whether the measurement of this fear is trustworthy and comparable across countries. In particular, we explored the measurement invariance and cross-cultural replicability of the widely-used Fear of COVID-19 (the FCV-19S) scale, testing community samples from 48 countries (N = 14,558). T...
Article
Full-text available
Before vaccines for COVID-19 became available, a set of infection prevention behaviors constituted the primary means to mitigate the virus spread. Our study aimed to identify important predictors of this set of behaviors. Whereas social and health psychological theories suggest a limited set of predictors, machine learning analyses can identify cor...
Article
Full-text available
Anxiety associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and home confinement has been associated with adverse health behaviors, such as unhealthy eating, smoking, and drinking. However, most studies have been limited by regional sampling, which precludes the examination of behavioral consequences associated with the pandemic at a global level. Further, few s...
Article
Understanding the determinants of COVID-19 vaccine uptake is important to inform policy decisions and plan vaccination campaigns. The aims of this research were to: (1) explore the individual- and country-level determinants of intentions to be vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, and (2) examine worldwide variation in vaccination intentions. This cross-s...
Article
Full-text available
Tightening social norms is thought to be adaptive for dealing with collective threat yet it may have negative consequences for increasing prejudice. The present research investigated the role of desire for cultural tightness, triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, in increasing negative attitudes towards immigrants. We used participant-level data from...
Article
During the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. conservative politicians and the media downplayed the risk of both contracting COVID-19 and the effectiveness of recommended health behaviors. Health behavior theories suggest perceived vulnerability to a health threat and perceived effectiveness of recommended health-protective behaviors dete...
Article
Full-text available
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a global health crisis. Consequently, many countries have adopted restrictive measures that caused a substantial change in society. Within this framework, it is reasonable to suppose that a sentiment of societal discontent, defined as generalized concern about the precarious state of socie...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines whether compliance with COVID-19 mitigation measures is motivated by wanting to save lives or save the economy (or both), and which implications this carries to fight the pandemic. National representative samples were collected from 24 countries (N = 25,435). The main predictors were (1) perceived risk to contract coronavirus, (...
Article
Full-text available
This study compares the individual-level and sample-level predictive utility of a measure of the cultural logics of dignity, honor, and face. University students in 29 samples from 24 nations used a simple measure to rate their perceptions of the interpersonal cultural logic characterizing their local culture. The nomological net of these measures...
Preprint
Full-text available
The Coronavirus is highly infectious and potentially deadly. In the absence of a cure or a vaccine, the infection prevention behaviors recommended by the World Health Organization constitute the only measure that is presently available to combat the pandemic. The unprecedented impact of this pandemic calls for swift identification of factors most i...
Preprint
Full-text available
In this work, we study how social contacts and feelings of solidarity shape experiences of loneliness during the COVID-19 lockdown in early 2020. We draw on cross-national data, collected across four time points between mid-March until early May 2020. We situate our work within the public debate on these issues and discuss to what extent the public...
Preprint
Full-text available
According to health behavior theories, perceived vulnerability to a health threat and perceived effectiveness of recommended health-protective behaviors determine motivation to follow these recommendations. Because the U.S. President Trump and U.S. conservative politicians downplayed the risk and seriousness of contracting COVID-19 and the effectiv...
Article
Full-text available
The PsyCorona collaboration is a research project to examine processes involved in the COVID-19 pandemic, such as behavior that curbs virus transmission, which may implicate social norms, cooperation, and self-regulation. The study also examines psychosocial consequences of physical distancing strategies and societal lockdown, such as frustration o...
Article
Full-text available
Mapping the Moods of COVID-19: Global Study Uses Data Visualization to Track Psychological Responses, Identify Targets for Intervention
Article
Full-text available
Sex differences in aspects of independent versus interdependent self-construal and depressive symptoms were surveyed among 5,320 students from 24 nations. Men were found to perceive themselves as more self-contained whereas women perceived themselves as more connected to others. No significant sex differences were found on two further dimensions of...
Preprint
Full-text available
This paper examines whether compliance with COVID-19 mitigation measures is motivated by wanting to save lives or save the economy (or both), and which implications this carries to fight the pandemic. National representative samples were collected from 24 countries (N=25,435). The main predictors were (i) perceived risk to contract coronavirus, (ii...
Preprint
Full-text available
Previous studies suggested that public trust in government is vital for implementations of social policies that rely on public's behavioural responses. This study examined associations of trust in government regarding COVID-19 control with recommended health behaviours and prosocial behaviours. Data from an international survey with representative...
Article
Abstract Objectives: The Dark Triad traits (i.e., narcissism, psychopathy, Machiavellianism) capture individual differences in aversive personality to complement work on other taxonomies, such as the Big Five traits. However, the literature on the Dark Triad traits relies mostly on samples from English-speaking (i.e., Westernized) countries. We bro...
Presentation
Full-text available
This project involves more than 30 researchers from 25 countries in more than 15 languages. This is a brief presentation highlighting current phase of data collection with the measures we've been using and overall data collection sites and expected sample sizes. I've also provided some brief expected results or anticipated findings. I am still Data...
Article
Full-text available
The Breast Size Satisfaction Survey (BSSS) was established to assess women’s breast size dissatisfaction and breasted experiences from a cross-national perspective. A total of 18,541 women were recruited from 61 research sites across 40 nations and completed measures of current-ideal breast size discrepancy, as well as measures of theorised anteced...
Article
Full-text available
Mindfulness, namely present-oriented attention that is non-judgmental in nature, and grit, namely perseverance and passion for long-term goals, are psychological constructs that have recently received considerable attention within the West. Given the theoretical importance and heretofore lack of research into how these two constructs relate to each...
Article
Full-text available
Self-continuity – the sense that one’s past, present, and future are meaningfully connected – is considered a defining feature of personal identity. However, bases of self-continuity may depend on cultural beliefs about personhood. In multilevel analyses of data from 7287 adults from 55 cultural groups in 33 nations, we tested a new tripartite theo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Compulsive buying is dysfunctional consumer behaviour with harmful personal, social, psychological, and financial problems. Social psychological perspectives define compulsive buying as an extreme form of ordinary buying motivated by mood regulation and identity seeking (Dittmar, 2004). The present research aims to predict compulsive buying tendenc...
Article
Full-text available
Beliefs about personhood are understood to be a defining feature of individualism-collectivism (I-C), but they have been insufficiently explored, given the emphasis of research on values and self-construals. We propose the construct of contextualism, referring to beliefs about the importance of context in understanding people, as a facet of cultura...
Article
Full-text available
Beliefs about personhood are understood to be a defining feature of individualism-collectivism (I-C), but they have been insufficiently explored, given the emphasis of research on values and self-construals. We propose the construct of contextualism, referring to beliefs about the importance of context in understanding people, as a facet of cultura...
Article
Full-text available
Beliefs about personhood are understood to be a defining feature of individualism-collectivism (I-C), but they have been insufficiently explored, given the emphasis of research on values and self-construals. We propose the construct of contextualism, referring to beliefs about the importance of context in understanding people, as a facet of cultura...

Network

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Projects

Projects (10)
Project
There are three main research goals: to examine the (1) role of individual-level factors in adopting beliefs in just war ; (2) universality (vs. cultural specificity) of beliefs related to just war; and (3) macro-level factors moderating the concept of just war across national and religious backgrounds. To examine the concept of just war we use three-dimensional model of beliefs in just war: (1) just war – restricted view on reasons and means of war, as self-defensive and targeted only toward military goals; (2) utilitarian war – unrestricted view on war reasons, accepting war as a way of intergroup conflicts resolutions; (3) dirty war – unrestricted view on war means, accepting any means useful in defeating the enemy.
Project
The Body Image in Nature Survey (BINS) is currently seeking international collaborators who would like to be involved in the project. For more information, please email viren.swami@aru.ac.uk. The BINS is an international, collaborative project with the primary aim of examining cross-sectional associations between nature exposure and positive body image across different world regions. By involving researchers from multiple sites across the globe, the BINS will produce one of the largest datasets examining the impact of nature exposure across countries. In so doing, the BINS will be able to help determine the extent to which nature exposure is reliably associated with more positive body image. The BINS is led by Prof Viren Swami (Anglia Ruskin University and Perdana University), Prof Stefan Stieger (Karl Landsteiner University of Health Sciences), Prof Ulrich S. Tran and Prof Martin Voracek (University of Vienna). The project commenced in late 2020, with all data collection expected to be completed by December 2021.
Project
Recently, WHO announced COVID-19 outbreak as pandemic. It has been getting more critical across the world. The main focus is the belief in a just world (BJW), which is the belief that people get what they deserve and deserve what they get (Lerner, 1980). Previous studies found that BJW related to well-being and healthy coping when facing negative life events. The aim of the project is to examine relationships between BJW, well-being and behaviour avoid transmitting disease to others. According to research ethics approval, the scope of this project is a survey research recruiting participants in Asia (e.g., Brunei, mainland China, Hong Kong S.A.R., India, Indonesia, Japan, Macau S.A.R., Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.) If you are in Asia, especially the sites I mentioned earlier in the examples and interested in research collaboration, please discuss further in details.