Petra M Visser

Petra M Visser
University of Amsterdam | UVA · Department of Freshwater and Marine Biology

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129
Publications
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Publications

Publications (129)
Article
Full-text available
Benthic cyanobacteria have commonly been a small but integral component of coral reef ecosystems, fulfilling the critical function of introducing bioavailable nitrogen to an inherently oligotrophic environment. Though surveys may have previously neglected benthic cyanobacteria, or grouped them with more conspicuous benthic groups, emerging evidence...
Article
Full-text available
Nuisance, toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a persistent and globally expanding problem. Prevention of blooms requires that external and internal sources of nutrients are managed to levels where development of cyanobacterial blooms is restricted. Control of blooms, in which their presence is reduced to a level where they no longer pose a risk through...
Article
Full-text available
Turf algae increasingly dominate benthic communities on coral reefs. Given their abundance and high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) release rates, turf algae are considered important contributors to the DOC pool on modern reefs. The release of photosynthetically fixed carbon as DOC generally, but not always, increases with increased light availabili...
Article
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While eutrophication remains one of the main pressures acting on freshwater ecosystems, the prevalence of anthropogenic and nature‐induced stochastic pulse perturbations is predicted to increase due to climate change. Despite all our knowledge on the effects of eutrophication and stochastic events operating in isolation, we know little about how eu...
Article
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To determine the drivers of phytoplankton biomass, we collected standardized morphometric, physical, and biological data in 230 lakes across the Mediterranean, Continental, and Boreal climatic zones of the European continent. Multilinear regression models tested on this snapshot of mostly eutrophic lakes (median total phosphorus [TP] = 0.06 and tot...
Presentation
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This presentation is focused on benthic cyanobacterial mats on coral reefs and presents results from our most recent publication: "First insights into the impacts of benthic cyanobacterial mats on fish herbivory functions on a nearshore coral reef"
Article
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Applying low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to lakes is an emerging method to mitigate harmful cyanobacterial blooms. While cyanobacteria are very sensitive to H2O2, little is known about the impacts of these H2O2 treatments on other members of the microbial community. In this study, we investigated changes in microbial community compos...
Article
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Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are becoming increasingly common on coral reefs. In Fiji, blooms generally occur in nearshore areas during warm months but some are starting to prevail through cold months. Many fundamental knowledge gaps about BCM proliferation remain, including their composition and how they influence reef processes. This study...
Article
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Oceanographic studies have shown that heterotrophic bacteria can protect marine cyanobacteria against oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Could a similar interspecific protection play a role in freshwater ecosystems? In a series of laboratory experiments, we demonstrate that freshwater cyanobacteria are sensitive to H2O2 but can be...
Article
In the past decades, the intensity and duration of cyanobacterial blooms are increasing due to anthropogenic factors. These phenomena worry drinking water companies and water managers because cyanobacteria produce a diverse range of cyanotoxins, which can cause liver, digestive and neurological diseases. The main exposure routes for humans are the...
Article
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Application of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relatively new and promising method to selectively suppress harmful cyanobacterial blooms, while minimizing effects on eukaryotic organisms. However, it is still unknown how nutrient limitation affects the sensitivity of cyanobacteria to H2O2. In this study, we compare effects of H2...
Article
Climate change not only intensifies eutrophication and enhances the rainfall, but also elevates the contents of greenhouse gases, which can further increase the intensity and frequency of extreme precipitation events. The effectivity of phytoremediation of urban wastewaters by water hyacinths under an extreme rainfall event (up to 380 mm d⁻¹) was i...
Article
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Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be used as an emergency method to selectively suppress cyanobacterial blooms in lakes and drinking water reservoirs. However, it is largely unknown how environmental parameters alter the effectiveness of H2O2 treatments. In this study, the toxic cyanobacterial strain Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806 was treated with a ra...
Article
Full-text available
Under ongoing climate change and increasing anthropogenic activity, which continuously challenge ecosystem resilience, an in-depth understanding of ecological processes is urgently needed. Lakes, as providers of numerous ecosystem services, face multiple stressors that threaten their functioning. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are a persistent probl...
Article
Cyanobacteria can form dense and sometimes toxic blooms in freshwater and marine environments, which threaten ecosystem functioning and degrade water quality for recreation, drinking water, fisheries and human health. Here, we review evidence indicating that cyanobacterial blooms are increasing in frequency, magnitude and duration globally. We high...
Article
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Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to thei...
Article
Full-text available
Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution ofcyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus onhepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g.,anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their p...
Article
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Lake Uddelermeer (The Netherlands) is characterized by turbid conditions and annual blooms of toxic cyanobacteria, which are supposed to be the result of increased agricultural activity in the twentieth century AD. We applied a combination of classic palaeoecological proxies and novel geochemical proxies to the Holocene sediment record of Lake Udde...
Article
Under ongoing climate change and increasing anthropogenic activity, which continuously challenge ecosystem resilience, an in-depth understanding of ecological processes is urgently needed. Lakes, as providers of numerous ecosystem services, face multiple stressors that threaten their functioning. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are a persistent probl...
Article
Full-text available
Using frequent and long‐term measurements (eight times per day, 2011 to present) from a geostationary satellite sensor (Geostationary Ocean Color Imager, GOCI), this study investigates diurnal changes of cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa blooms (near‐surface high concentrations or surface scums) in Taihu Lake, from which vertical migration patt...
Article
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p>This review aims to summarise the outcomes of some recent European research concerning toxic cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins, with an emphasis on developments within the framework of the CYANOCOST Action (COST Action ES1105, Cyanobacterial Blooms and Toxins in Water Resources: Occurrence, Impacts and Management). State of the art research and manag...
Article
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This is the Editorial to a Special Issue entitled “Cyanobacterial blooms. Ecology, prevention, mitigation and control”. The Special Issue is a product of a European COST Action, CYANOCOST. In this Special Issue, contributions describe methods currently available for the management of cyanobacterial blooms, a key issue threatening the ecological fun...
Article
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To help ban the use of general toxic algicides, research efforts are now directed towards the discovery of compounds that are specifically acting as cyanocides. Here, we review the past and look forward into the future, where the less desirable general algicides like copper sulphate, diuron or endothall may become replaced by compounds that show be...
Article
This is the Editorial to a Special Issue entitled “Cyanobacterial blooms. Ecology, prevention, mitigation and control”. The Special Issue is a product of a European COST Action, CYANOCOST. In this Special Issue, contributions describe methods currently available for the management of cyanobacterial blooms, a key issue threatening the ecological fun...
Article
Full-text available
Terrestrial runoff after heavy rainfall can increase nutrient concentrations in waters overlying coral reefs that otherwise experience low nutrient levels. Field measurements during a runoff event showed a sharp increase in nitrate (75-fold), phosphate (31-fold) and ammonium concentrations (3-fold) in waters overlying a fringing reef at the island...
Article
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Sedimentation from resuspension following storm surge is a natural occurrence on coral reefs, and scleractinian corals have adapted to effectively reject sediment. However, it is unclear whether the physical ability to reject sedimentation is affected during seasonal temperature extremes. We acclimated three coral species (Montipora aequituberculat...
Article
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Artificial mixing has been used as a measure to prevent the growth of cyanobacteria in eutrophic lakes and reservoirs for many years. In this paper, we give an overview of studies that report on the results of this remedy. Generally, artificial mixing causes an increase in the oxygen content of the water, an increase in the temperature in the deep...
Article
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Experiments with different phytoplankton densities in lake samples showed that a high biomass increases the rate of hydrogen peroxide (HP) degradation and decreases the effectiveness of HP in the selective suppression of dominant cyanobacteria. However, selective application of HP requires usage of low doses only, accordingly this defines the limit...
Conference Paper
Many coral reef ecosystems have shifted from coral to algal dominance. To what extent this shift in dominance pattern alters the primary productivity of reefs has received relatively little attention. Using 13C labeling we assessed the contribution of different benthic primary producers and phytoplankton of a degraded coral reef in the Caribbean. T...
Conference Paper
Cyanobacteria occur on coral reefs in various forms: as phytoplankton, symbionts in corals, within turf algal communities and as benthic mats or tufts. These benthic cyanobacteria are becoming increasingly abundant on coral reefs, probably caused by eutrophication, and are potentially threatening reef organisms. We collected different mat and tuft...
Article
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Anticipated climatic changes combined with eutrophication are predicted to enhance the dominance of several notorious cyanobacterial taxa. Cyanobacteria have many key ecological traits that may allow them to thrive under foreseen scenarios of environmental change. Understanding the ecophysiological traits of harmful species has proven important for...
Article
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Analyses of pollen, diatoms, XRF geochemistry, and pigments provide a unique window into how an insular ecosystem in Mauritius responded to an extreme drought event 4200 years ago. We provide a reconstruction of regional vegetation change and local wetland development under influence of sea level rise and inferred climate change between 4400 and 41...
Article
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Algal turf communities are ubiquitous on coral reefs in the Caribbean and are often dominated by N2-fixing cyanobacteria. However, it is largely unknown (1) how much N2 is actually fixed by turf communities and (2) which factors affect their N2 fixation rates. Therefore, we compared N2 fixation activity by turf communities at different depths and d...
Article
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Harmful algal blooms threaten the water quality of many eutrophic and hypertrophic lakes and cause severe ecological and economic damage worldwide. Dense blooms often deplete the dissolved CO2 concentration and raise pH. Yet, quantitative prediction of the feedbacks between phytoplankton growth, CO2 drawdown and the inorganic carbon chemistry of aq...
Article
Although rising CO2 concentrations are thought to promote the growth and alter the carbon : nutrient stoichiometry of primary producers, several studies have reported conflicting results. To reconcile these contrasting results, we tested the following hypotheses: rising CO2 levels (1) will increase phytoplankton biomass more at high nutrient loads...
Article
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Scleractinian corals and their algal endosymbionts (genus Symbiodinium) exhibit distinct bathymetric distributions on coral reefs. Yet, few studies have assessed the evolutionary context of these ecological distributions by exploring the genetic diversity of closely related coral species and their associated Symbiodinium over large depth ranges. He...
Conference Paper
Benthic cyanobacteria are increasing in abundance on reefs. They can be found on reefs as relatively loose mats and as turf algal communities consisting of several macroalgal and cyanobacterial species. Both compete for space with macroalgae and corals. Since many cyanobacteria produce toxins, they can be harmful for fish and other animals on reefs...
Article
Full-text available
Rapid determination of which nutrients limit the primary production of macroalgae and seagrasses is vital for understanding the impacts of eutrophication on marine and freshwater ecosystems. However, current methods to assess nutrient limitation are often cumbersome and time consuming. For phytoplankton, a rapid method has been described based on s...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Rapid determination of which nutrients limit the primary production of macroalgae and seagrasses is vital for understanding the impacts of eutrophication on marine and freshwater ecosystems. However, current methods to assess nutrient limitation are often cumbersome and time consuming. For phytoplankton, a rapid method has been describe...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Previously, treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) successfully suppressed cyanobacterial blooms in lakes. We adapted this treatment to battle a toxic Alexandrium ostenfeldii bloom which threatened shell fisheries. Using a three-step approach including laboratory experiments, a field pilot study and finally entire Kreek treatment, cell numbers wer...
Conference Paper
Rapid determination of which nutrients limit the growth of macroalgae can be of considerable importance for understanding the trophic status of coral reef ecosystems. Detection of nutrient limitation using the NIFT technique (Nutrient-Induced Fluorescence Transient) has been widely applied to pelagic phytoplankton. We developed an experimental set-...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms by which algae disperse across space on coral reefs are poorly known. We investigated the ability of four common Caribbean herbivorous fish species to disperse viable algal fragments through consumption of macroalgae and subsequent defecation. Fragments of all major algal taxa (Phaeophyta, Rhodophyta, and Chlorophyta) were found in 9...
Conference Paper
Rapid determination of which nutrients limit the growth of macroalgae can be of considerable importance for understanding the trophic status of coral reef ecosystems. Detection of nutrient limitation using the NIFT technique (Nutrient- Induced Fluorescence Transient) has been widely applied to pelagic phytoplankton. We developed an experimental set...
Article
Although harmful cyanobacteria form a major threat to water quality, few methods exist for the rapid suppression of cyanobacterial blooms. Since laboratory studies indicated that cyanobacteria are more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) than eukaryotic phytoplankton, we tested the application of H(2)O(2) in natural waters. First, we exposed...
Article
Full-text available
It has been frequently reported that seasonal changes in toxin production by cyanobacteria are due to changes in the proportion of toxic/nontoxic genotypes in parallel to increases or decreases in population density during the seasonal cycle of bloom formation. In order to find out whether there is a relationship between the proportion of genes enc...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change scenarios predict a doubling of the atmospheric CO(2) concentration by the end of this century. Yet, how rising CO(2) will affect the species composition of aquatic microbial communities is still largely an open question. In this study, we develop a resource competition model to investigate competition for dissolved inorganic carbon...
Article
Full-text available
Turf algae are multispecies communities of small marine macrophytes that are becoming a dominant component of coral reef communities around the world. To assess the impact of turf algae on corals, we investigated the effects of increased nutrients (eutrophication) on the interaction between the Caribbean coral Montastraea annularis and turf algae a...
Article
Planktothrix agardhii is a widespread harmful cyanobacterium of eutrophic waters, and can produce the hepatotoxins [Asp(3)]microcystin-LR and [Asp(3)]microcystin-RR. These two microcystin variants differ in their first variable amino acid position, which is occupied by either leucine (L) or arginine (R). Although microcystins are extensively invest...