Petr Brož

Petr Brož
The Czech Academy of Sciences | AVCR · Institute of Geophysics

PhD.

About

53
Publications
18,798
Reads
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535
Citations
Citations since 2016
17 Research Items
430 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Additional affiliations
September 2011 - September 2015
Charles University in Prague
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2006 - September 2010
Charles University in Prague
Field of study
  • Geology

Publications

Publications (53)
Article
We have identified small-scale volcanic edifices, two cones and three domes with associated flows, within Terra Sirenum, a region situated in the martian southern highlands. Based on thermal, morphological, and morphometrical properties, and the determination of absolute model ages, we conclude that these features were formed by volcanic activity o...
Article
Full-text available
Morphological observations of scoria cones on Mars show that their cross-sectional shapes are different from those on Earth. Due to lower gravity and atmospheric pressure on Mars, particles are spread over alarger area than on Earth. Hence, erupted volumes are typically not large enough for the flank slopes to attain the angle of repose, in contras...
Article
Hydrovolcanism is a common natural phenomenon on Earth and should be common on Mars, too, since its surface shows widespread evidence for volcanism and near-surface water. We investigate fields of pitted cones in the Nephentes/Amenthes region at the southernmargin of the ancient impact basin, Utopia, which were previously interpreted as mud volcano...
Article
Full-text available
Based on theoretical grounds, explosive basaltic volcanism should be common on Mars, yet the available morphological evidence is sparse. We test this hypothesis by investigating a unique unnamed volcanic field north of the shield volcanoes Biblis Patera and Ulysses Patera on Mars, where we observe several small conical edifices and associated lava...
Article
Full-text available
New spacecraft data provide increasing evidence for a dynamic environment on present‐day Mars. Exogenic processes such as impact cratering, mass wasting processes, and active dune migration have all been observed to modify the surface. No traces of current endogenic activity have been found yet, but some studies point to very localized volcanism in...
Article
Kilometre-sized flows (KSFs) have been observed in many regions on Mars and have been typically interpreted as lava flows. However, sedimentary volcanism has been proposed as an alternative origin for some KSFs. Remarkable examples of such hypothesized sedimentary KSFs are located at the southern margin of Chryse Planitia. There, the flows are asso...
Article
Decades of space exploration reveal that Mars has been reshaped by volcanism throughout its history. The range of observed volcanic landforms shows that effusive and explosive eruptions have occurred, albeit unevenly in time and space. Evidence for explosive volcanism—characterized as eruptions in which magma is disrupted by the expansion of dissol...
Article
Sediment mobilisation occurring at depth and ultimately manifesting at the surface, is a process which may have operated on Mars. However, the propagation behaviour of this mixture of water and sediments (hereafter simply referred to as mud) over the martian surface, remains uncertain. Although most of the martian surface is below freezing today, l...
Article
Full-text available
Large outflow channels on ancient terrains of Mars have been interpreted as the products of catastrophic flood events. The rapid burial of water-rich sediments after such flooding could have led to sedimentary volcanism, in which mixtures of sediment and water (mud) erupt to the surface. Tens of thousands of volcano-like landforms populate the nort...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here we present the results of experiments performed inside a low pressure chamber to investigate how mud would propagate over a 'warm' (~295 K) unconsolidated sandy surface under Martian atmospheric pressure conditions (~7 mbar). The results show that, flowing mud is capable of eroding down into the substrate. The gas released by boiling allows th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here, we present experimental results performed inside a low pressure chamber at cold temperatures to investigate the mechanisms of mud propagation on Mars. Our results show that low viscosity mud under such conditions propagates differently than on Earth, because of rapid freezing and the formation of an icy-crust. The protective crust means the m...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here we present the results of experiments performed inside a low pressure chamber to investigate how mud would propagate over a 'warm' (~295 K) unconsolidated sandy surface under Martian atmospheric pressure conditions (~7 mbar). The results show that, flowing mud is capable of eroding down into the substrate. The gas released by boiling allows th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here we present results of mud experiments performed inside a low pressure chamber to investigate the mechanisms of sedimentary volcanism on the cold Martian surface. Experiments reveal that a low pressure environment changes the behavior of mud and hence the shapes of the resulting mud flows. The experiments showed us that if the mud is extruded i...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Here we present results of mud experiments performed inside a low pressure chamber to investigate the mechanisms of sedimentary volcanism on the cold martian surface. Our results show that mud propagates under the martian environmental properties with a different behavior than on the Earth surface. Results show that Mars low atmospheric pressure an...
Article
Full-text available
The southern part of the smooth plain of Chryse Planitia on Mars hosts a large population of kilometer‐sized (from ~0.2 to ~20 km) landforms spread over a wide area. Based on the investigation of a small part of this area, Komatsu et al. (2016, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.icarus.2015.12.032) proposed that the edifices may be the result of the subsurf...
Chapter
The rapid development of geospatial methods in recent decades offers new ways how to investigate the evolution of the surfaces of the terrestrial bodies of the solar system. New methods of spatial distribution and alignment analyses can be used to find spatial and genetic relations between surface objects of our interest, their distribution pattern...
Article
Full-text available
Spacecraft data reveal that volcanism was active on Mercury. Evidence of large-volume effusive and smaller-scale explosive eruptions has been detected. However, only large (>~15 km) volcanic features or vents have been found so far, despite abundant high-resolution imagery. On other volcanic planets, the size of volcanoes is anticorrelated with the...
Article
Vinalia and Cerealia Faculae are bright and salt-rich localized areas in Occator crater on Ceres. The predominance of the near-infrared signature of sodium carbonate on these surfaces suggests their original material was a brine. Here we analyze Dawn Framing Camera's images and characterize the surfaces as composed of a central structure, either a...
Chapter
Endogenic processes in geology are a function of a body’s internal geodynamic activity.They comprise volcanic, tectonic, and isostatic processes, which shaped the surfaces of all terrestrial planets, the Moon, and basically all other Solar System bodies with solid surfaces that have been observed in some detail.The most recent spacecraft observatio...
Article
Full-text available
The giant trough system of Valles Marineris is one of the most spectacular landforms on Mars, yet its origin is still unclear. Although often referred to as a rift, it also shows some characteristics that are indicative of collapse processes. For decades, one of the major open questions was whether volcanism was active inside the Valles Marineris....
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
We analyze the shapes of twenty eight hypothesized scoria cones in three regions on Mars, i.e. Ulysses and Hydraotes Colles and Coprates Chasma. Using available HiRISE and CTX Digital Elevation Models, we determine the basic morphometric characteristics of the cones and estimate from ballistic modelling the physical parameters of volcanic eruptions...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Volcanoes differ in sizes, as does the amount of magma which ascends to a planetary surface. On Earth, the size of volcanoes is anti-correlated with their frequency, i.e. small volcanoes are much more numerous than large ones. The most common terrestrial volcanoes are scoria cones (<few km in diameter) followed by tuff cones and tuff rings. As Mars...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We present observations of a field of >100 pitted cones and mounds situated on the floor of Coprates Chasma (part of Valles Marineris (VM); Fig. 1), which display similarities to terrestrial and martian scoria cones. If these cones are indeed volcanic in origin, they will significantly expand our knowledge about the morphometry of pyroclastic cones...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction: The existence of scoria cones was suggested for several regions on Mars [1-4]; and at least in three cases they form volcanic fields: Ulysses Colles (UC) [4], Hydraotes Colles (HC) [3] and un-named field in Coprates Chasma (CC) [5,6]. Although the interpretation of these edifices as scoria cones was mainly based on their morphological...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Introduction: Volcanism was globally widespread on Mars in the early history of the planet, but became focused with ongoing evolution on two main volcanic provinces in the Tharsis and Elysium regions [e.g., 1-4]. Except for the widespread Hesperian ridged plains [5], and some isolated centrers (e.g., Tyrrhenus and Hadriacus Montes [4,6], evidence f...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We present observations of a field of more than 100 pitted cones and mounds situated insight Coprates Chasma (part of Valles Marineris; Fig. 1), which bear many morphological and morphometrical similarities to terrestrial and martian scoria cones. If these cones are indeed volcanic in origin, they will significantly expand our knowledge about the m...
Article
Young martian highland volcanism: Observation of small-scale volcanic landforms with outgoing lava flows as evidences for highly viscous lavas?
Chapter
DefinitionSmall truncated cone-shaped volcanic hill (Macdonald 1972) composed of unpaved cinder (scoria) and other pyroclastic deposits accumulated around an approximately circular vent or fissure vent that produces an elongated cone.SynonymsScoria cone, Tephra coneNoteEarth science literature today prefers the term scoria cone, whereas in planetar...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Volcanism on Mars was globally widespread in the early history, but was localized to a few main volcanic provinces [1]. Evidence for post-Noachian volcanism in the Martian highlands is rare outside these main provinces (e.g., Tyrrhena and Hadriaca Montes) and, to our knowledge; no such edifices have been reported so far. Here we report on our obser...
Article
Morphometric observations of Martian cinder cones [1] show that their shapes do not correspond to values previously predicted on theoretical grounds. Our study addresses this inconsistency by numerical modeling of tephra particle ejection and dispersal around the vent under Martian environmental conditions, and comparing the results with real morph...
Article
Full-text available
Left phreatomagmatic explosive eruptions some visible evidences on martian surface as tuff rings or tuff cones? Insight from Amenthes region.
Article
We present observations of two fields of small pitted and mostly breached cones; one located along the dichotomy boundary in the Amenthes region (southern Utopia); the second located in an unnamed impact crater in the Xanthe Terra region. The aim of our study is to test the hypothesis of a (hydro)volcanic origin of these cones, which would be an al...
Article
Full-text available
Aim of the study is a field of pitted cones located along the dichotomy boundary in the Amenthes region. We tested the hypothesis of a hydrovolcanic origin of the cones because the regional context displays lines of evidence for subsurface water ice.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study is focused on an unique unnamed volcanic field in Tharsis, where we observed several atypical small conical edifices. Our investigation suggests that these cones are monogenetic volcanoes. Their morphometric properties and a comparison to terrestrial analogues suggest that they are Martian equivalents of terrestrial cinder cones,.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigates older heavily fractured crust in the Tharsis region on Mars, which represents windows to Martian evolution. We observe small positive landforms associated with fractured crust. These edifices seem to be similar to pyroclastic cones that form an unique volcanic field in the southern Ulysses Fossae. We conclude that the edific...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We describe the morphology and morphometry of a unique volcanic field in Tharsis, Mars. The landforms are interpreted as well-preserved cinder cones and associated lava flows. We infer that they were formed by Hawaiian eruptions.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The morphology and topography of volcanic landforms provides critical information to the investigation of their tectonic setting and the physical characteristics (e.g., rheology) of their eruption products. Their investigation is also an important prerequisite for studies of comparative planetology, e.g., the comparison between surface features of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Plain-style volcanism [1] is widespread in the Tharsis and Elysium volcanic provinces on Mars, [2,3]. Detailed images and topographic data reveal the morphology and topography of clusters of low shields and associated lava flows. The landforms of plains volcanism on Mars have all well-known terrestrial analogues in basaltic volcanic regions, such a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Ages of plains volcanism in Tharsis, Mars, range from
Article
Full-text available
The morphology and topography of volcanic landforms provides critical information to the investigation of their tectonic setting and the physical characteristics (e.g., rheology) of their eruption products. Their investigation is also an important prerequisite for studies of comparative planetology, e.g., the comparison between surface features of...

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Project (1)
Archived project
The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare the morphometries of terrestrial mud volcanoes and putative Martian scoria cones and possible mud volcano cones in ambiguous and sedimentary contexts on Mars. The first objective is to extend and build on the work done by Brož et al. (2015) and investigate several additional fields where the putative mud volcanoes have been described (e.g., Komatsu et al., 2016; Okubo, 2016) and compare shapes of these cones within those new fields with previous results and to find if they are some variations in their morphometries