Peter Zahler

Peter Zahler
Woodland Park Zoo Seattle | ZOO

About

64
Publications
13,323
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
639
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
368 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060

Publications

Publications (64)
Article
Full-text available
Human conflict with large carnivores continues to be a great conservation challenge, and conflict with snow leopards (Panthera uncia) has been studied to understand causes and propose mitigation schemes. While the nature of snow leopard-human conflict is similar in most cases, reported studies have been case-and area-specific with mitigation strate...
Article
We surveyed the urial Ovis vignei and Siberian ibex Capra sibirica in the Hindu Kush mountain range of Wakhan National Park in northeastern Afghanistan to determine their population status and identify potential drivers of population change. We conducted two double-observer ground surveys, in April-May  and , in  areas (total =  km )....
Article
Full-text available
In Asia, markhor Capra falconeri and Siberian ibex Capra sibirica occur in six and eleven countries respectively, and both species have been reported in Afghanistan. However, few wildlife studies in Afghanistan have been made in recent years and the current distribution of markhor and ibex is largely unknown. We conducted field surveys in northern...
Article
Full-text available
This study was carried out to investigate the status of the flare-horned markhor (Capra falconeri falconeri) in Jutial Conservancy, District Gilgit, Gilgit-Baltistan. Field surveys were conducted during the winter (rut season) of 2014 when markhor population gathered in large herds at lower slopes. Habitat degradation due to removal of natural vege...
Article
Because of its diverse geological formations, climates, and soils, Iran is home to outstanding biodiversity. National conservation started in Iran over fifty years ago and today nearly 10 percent of the country is protected. However, biodiversity in Iran is threatened, with about 100 species of vertebrate fauna vulnerable or endangered. Increased p...
Chapter
All species, but particularly broadly distributed ones like the snow leopard (. Panthera uncia), require a strategy for successful conservation, because conservation requires cooperation, and cooperation requires strategic agreement. Good strategies articulate a vision of success, set time-bound goals, and describe why, where, and what conservation...
Chapter
Snow leopards share their remote mountains with poor, isolated communities that face increasing challenges, dwindling resources, and threats that range from encroaching commercial interests to climate change. These communities are often marginalized, receiving little or no support from government at local or national level. Innovative approaches ha...
Chapter
Snow leopards are known to cross international boundaries. Such boundaries can create barriers to the effective understanding and conservation of the species. Transboundary cooperation facilitates scientific research and monitoring of populations. Joint research programs can eliminate duplication, enlarge perspectives and pool skills, standardize r...
Chapter
The snow leopard's high mountain landscape is changing. Local human communities are growing in size, as are their populations of livestock and thus their grazing pressure. Competition with and disturbance of wild ungulates (snow leopard prey) is increasing, and hunting pressure - greatly amplified by radical improvements and increasing availability...
Chapter
Paleontological records provide little evidence regarding snow leopard evolution or historic range. A reasonably accurate range map was published in 1972, and maps using GIS modeling to predict potential snow leopard habitat followed in 1997. Today we know snow leopards occur in 12 countries coinciding with the prominent mountain ranges of central...
Article
Nuristan province, in north-east Afghanistan, holds a significant portion of the country's remaining forests, but because of the inaccessible terrain and the recent history of poor security little is known about the wildlife inhabiting these forests. We conducted transect surveys in central Nuristan and confirmed the presence of musk deer Moschus c...
Technical Report
Full-text available
A number of activities have taken place to reduce the negative impacts arising from the rapid growth of linear infrastructure such as fences, roads and railroads in Central Asia. Activities included the production of studies and reports, the organization of workshops as well as the development of guidelines. The Conference of the Parties is invited...
Article
Accurate field identification of illegally traded wildlife and wildlife products is critically important in the detection and suppression of wildlife crimes. Yet many law enforcement officers and concerned citizens lack access to resources for identifying species and products; this is particularly true for those with no formal expertise in biology,...
Chapter
Mammals constitute only approximately 12% of all vertebrates and only 0.3% of all known species of organisms, yet endangered mammals (mammals facing an imminent threat of extinction) have received a disproportionate amount of attention and conservation efforts. To a large extent, this is the result of the higher visibility and appeal of mammals com...
Article
Factors affecting juvenile survival are poorly known in the world's most northern antelope, the endangered saiga (Saiga tatarica), yet these factors are fundamental for understanding what drives population change. We monitored Mongolia saiga (S. tatarica mongolica) calves in Sharga Nature Reserve, western Mongolia, during 2008–2010. Our results sho...
Article
Over the 50+ years that {WCS} has been implementing biodiversity conservation programs across the world we have learned that supporting and promoting transparent and equitable local resource governance systems is not only the most efficient and sustainable approach to conserving wildlife and wild places, it is a critically important pathway towards...
Article
Military personnel and affiliates have significant buying power that can influence demand for wildlife products. Purchase and transport of certain wildlife products violates United States laws, military regulations, and national country laws where the items were purchased. We surveyed military bazaars (n = 4) in Kabul, Afghanistan from June 2007 to...
Article
Afghanistan’s position in latitude, geography and at the intersection of three biogeographic realms has resulted in a surprising biodiversity. Its wildlife includes species such as the snow leopard, Asiatic black bear, Marco Polo sheep, markhor and greater flamingo. Principal threats include high levels of deforestation, land encroachment and hunti...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Afghanistan lies at the juncture of the Paleoarctic, IndoMalayan, and African biotic realms, and therefore has a rich biodiversity. For example, there are at least 9 species of cat extant in Afghanistan now, with two others only recently extirpated from the country. It is home to such iconic species as snow leopards (Unc...
Article
Land bridges once assured transcontinental connectivity, but climate-induced habitat loss resulted in the extinction of numerous North American large mammals. Using GPS technology on the formerly widespread but now endangered saiga in Mongolia, we identified a fine-scaled 5-km wide critical corridor, whose protection is critical for maintaining mig...
Article
Full-text available
Human–nature interactions shape biodiversity and natural resources. Planning conservation and engaging stakeholders in dialogues about conservation require an understanding of indirect threats arising from socioeconomic and political conditions, plus participatory methods to build consensus for action. We present a method for spatial assessment of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Silent Steppe is the product of the Environment and Social Development unit in the East Asia and Pacific region of the World Bank in a series of activities by the Bank and our development partners to understand the driving forces of wildlife trade, its scale and operation, and to identify successful solutions to address illegal trade. A previous pu...
Article
Full-text available
Recent reports and studies document dramatic declines in a wide variety of wildlife species in Mongolia. The prime driver in these declines appears to be illegal and unsustainable hunting, both for local trade and consumption and for the international market. While data on these declines are sparse, comparisons of survey reports since the 1980s pre...
Article
Numrug Strictly Protected Area (SPA) is aunique part of Mongolia’s protected areas system.Located in Dornod Aimag at the easternmost edgeof Mongolia, bordering China, it is considered tobe part of the Eastern Steppe region. However,Nomrog SPA is quite different from the rest of theEastern Steppe in topography, soils, vegetation, andwildlife. Nomrog...
Article
Information was collected on roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) distribution on the Eastern Steppe ofMongolia from 2000 to 2003. During this period, 65 roe deer were observed. Roe Deer were distributedthroughout the Eastern Steppe region, but all sightings occurred in or adjacent to small woodland patchesor riparian woodland. These woodland patches and...
Article
Full-text available
An international workshop on gazelle harvesting and management was held in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, in October, 2003. The major output from this workshop was the general agreement that no commercial hunt can be recommended at this time. This is because of the high level of poaching that is appearing to be having a negative impact on gazelle numbers....
Article
Full-text available
The woolly flying squirrel (Eupetaurus cinereus) is an extremely aberrant sciurid. It is the longest squirrel in the world and the only sciurid with hypsodont dentition. Most of the information on this species comes from a few study skins collected from the western Himalayas over a century ago. The unusual tooth structure of the squirrel led to sup...
Article
The woolly flying squirrelEupetaurus cinereus! Thomas, 1888 is the longest sciurid and most massive mammalian glider in the world. Because of this, there has been some question about the squirrel’s gliding ability. I document three glide events performed by this species. These glide events, coupled with comparisons of glide ratios, ponderal ratios,...
Article
Full-text available
The woolly flying squirrel (Eupetaurus cinereus) is a rare, unusual, and poorly-known sciurid. Most information concerning this species comes from a few study skins collected over a century ago. In 1994, a live specimen was captured in northern Pakistan, and new physical and behavioral information gathered. Remains of other specimens were found, an...
Article
Full-text available
A survey of small mammals and birds in the Carabaya region of the southern Peruvian Andes resulted in the discovery that the Lake Sibinacocha watershed has an extremely high biodiversity, both in terms of species richness and abundance. Recent anthropogenic changes in the Carabaya region, especially related to the completion of the Transoceanic Hig...
Article
Full-text available
The Tropical Andes is the most amphibian diverse region of the planet. Despite this diversity the region has experienced human related disturbances for thousands of years. But now a new disturbance, the construction of the transoceanic highway, threatens to increase commercial scale resource extraction in the region. To document what might be lost,...

Network

Cited By