Peter Pearce

Peter Pearce
Metanoia Institute · Faculty of Applied Social and Organisational Science

Doctor of Psychotherapy

About

16
Publications
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60
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2003 - September 2015
Metanoia Institute
Position
  • Faculty Head

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
Background About one in seven adolescents have a mental health disorder in England, UK. School counselling is one of the most common means of trying to address such a problem. We aimed to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of school-based humanistic counselling (SBHC) for the treatment of psychological distress in young people in En...
Article
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Effectiveness evidence supporting school-based counselling is increasing, yet little is known about its cost-effectiveness. Within an effectiveness trial we tested whether a cost-effectiveness evaluation was feasible and aimed to provide early indications of support and associated costs for students with emotional problems. A service use questionna...
Article
Full-text available
Background: One in ten children in Britain have been identified as experiencing a diagnosable mental health disorder. School-based humanistic counselling (SBHC) may help young people identify, address, and overcome psychological distress. Data from four pilot trials suggest that SBHC may be clinically effective. However, a fully powered randomised...
Article
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Effectiveness of school-based humanistic counselling for psychological distress in young people: Pilot randomised controlled trial with follow-up in an ethnically diverse sample Objectives. The aim of this study was to pilot a test of the effectiveness of school-based humanistic counselling (SBHC) in an ethnically diverse group of young people (age...
Article
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Objectives: The aim of this study was to pilot a test of the effectiveness of school-based humanistic counselling (SBHC) in an ethnically diverse group of young people (aged 11-18 years old), with follow-up assessments at 6 and 9 months. Design: Pilot randomized controlled trial, using linear-mixed effect modelling and intention-to-treat analysi...
Article
Background There is a growing body of data to show that participation in school-based counselling is associated with significant reductions in psychological distress. However, this cannot be taken as evidence that school-based counselling is effective, as improvements may have happened without the intervention.AimsThe purpose of this study was to d...
Article
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Drawing on many years’ experience of counselling in secondary schools, Peter Pearce and Ros Sewell propose a new theory to capture the sometimes fleeting nature of the counsellor’s relationship with young people
Article
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In beginning to contemplate what I might write for this invitation to follow Carl Rogers, 40 years on, I initially felt flattered to be asked and daunted to follow such a pioneer and towering figure within psychology as Rogers. In beginning to contemplate what I had to say, I began to feel that the invitation to ‘speak to the profession’ also felt...
Article
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Research As reported in February's Therapy Today, 1 BACP has, with partners in the higher education sector, developed a continuing professional development (CPD) training programme in Counselling for Depression (CfD), for counsellors working in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. The training is currently being rolled out a...
Article
Full-text available
Training CfD is recommended in the NICE depression guideline for the treatment of people with persistent sub-threshold depressive symptoms or mild to moderate depression. Between six and 10 treatment sessions are recommended, over a period of eight to 12 weeks. Other IAPT therapies are typically offered in contracts of 15–20 sessions. To create par...
Article
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The title of this book makes a bold assertion: 'Person-Centered and Experiential therapies work.' Eighteen authors, all leading experts in their fields, review the available evidence to support this assertion across a range of sectors and person-centered and experiential (PCE) research tools and methods.

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Evidence-based psychological interventions are available for young people, but these are primarily targeted at specific psychological ‘disorders’, such as depression and generalised anxiety. By contrast, many young people in schools are experiencing life difficulties such as family problems, bullying, and bereavement that do not fit into specific diagnostic categories; but which have the potential to develop into more severe psychological problems if they are not addressed at an early stage. School-based counselling is an approach implemented in approximately two-thirds of secondary schools in the UK to address these broad-ranging difficulties. In contrast to diagnosis-based interventions, school-based counselling aims to provide young people with a non-judgmental, empathic and confidential opportunity to talk through their problems and to find personal solutions. A distilled and standardised form of school-based counselling -- school-based humanistic counselling (SBHC) -- has now been established, and four pilot studies indicate that it has short-term effectiveness. a fully-powered trial is needed to provide a more definitive evaluation of its outcomes. There is also a need to see whether it is effective in the long-term, whether it is cost-effective, and the aspects of this intervention that are experienced as helpful and unhelpful. The findings of this study will be able to feed directly into Department for Education and Department of Health policy decisions regarding the implementation of school-based counselling services across England. This is something that is currently being considered, but decision-making is impeded by the lack of evidence. Method We will conduct the study by establishing a counselling service in 18 English secondary schools that do not currently have an established counselling provision. We will be aiming to recruit approximately 325 young people across these schools, aged 13-16, who are assessed as experiencing symptoms of emotional distress. We will provide some of these young people with up to 10 weeks of school-based humanistic counselling, while others will receive their school’s usual pastoral care services. Decisions about who gets what treatment will be made on a random basis, as this gives us the best chance of working out if the treatment really works. After six weeks, three and six months, we will look at whether those young people who received counselling are experiencing less psychological distress than those who did not. We will also look at whether the benefits of providing a counselling service justify the costs. The safety of the young people involved will be a major concern throughout the trial. We will not include any young person who is at risk of harm to self or other, but refer them to specialist support. We will assess young people in the study and arrange for appropriate support for them if we become concerned about them. We will also ensure the highest levels of anonymity and confidentiality for participants. Participating Schools 18 English secondary schools that do not currently have an established counselling provision are being recruited to participate in the study. Eligible schools will receive a high quality professional, counselling service at no cost to the school for two years in return for participation. Counselling sessions will need to be recorded for audit purposes. This material will be anonymised and held securely, in line with information governance good practice. The participating young people will additionally be invited to meet with a researcher for short interviews at the outset, after 6 and 12 weeks and then at 6 months follow up. Funding The project is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. Research team The project is being led by Prof. Mick Cooper at the University of Roehampton. Co-investigators are Peter Pearce (Metanoia Institute), Prof. Michael Barkham (University of Sheffield), Prof. Peter Bower (University of Manchester), Ms Karen Cromarty Prof. Jenni Beachem (London School of Economics), Dr Andy Fugard (University College London), Ms Charlie Jackson (BACP), Dr Cathy Street (National Children’s Bureau), and Manchester Academic Health Science Centre Trials Co-ordination Unit.