Peter - Neumann

Peter - Neumann
Universität Bern | UniBe · Vetsuisse Faculty

Prof. Dr. rer. nat.

About

422
Publications
194,929
Reads
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16,401
Citations
Introduction
Peter - Neumann currently works at the Vetsuisse Faculty, Universität Bern. Peter does research in Ecology, Entomology and Evolutionary Biology.
Additional affiliations
February 2016 - March 2016
Zhejiang University
Position
  • Professor
September 2015 - December 2018
Chiang Mai University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
September 2013 - March 2022
COLOSS association
Position
  • President
Description
  • COLOSS (prevention of honey bee COlony LOSSes) is an international, non-profit association that seeks to improve the well-being of bees at a global level (>1500 members from >100 countries, www.coloss.org).
Education
April 2006 - May 2006
Universität Bern
Field of study
  • Evolutionary and Behavioral Ecology
March 2001 - July 2004
May 1994 - August 1998
Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg
Field of study
  • Molecular Ecology

Publications

Publications (422)
Article
Full-text available
Small hive beetles (SHBs) are generalists native to sub-Saharan Africa and reproduce in association with honeybees, bumblebees, stingless bees, fruits and meat. The SHB has recently become an invasive species and introductions have been recorded from America, Australia, Europe and Asia since 1996. While SHBs are usually considered a minor pest in A...
Article
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Co-evolution is a major driving force shaping the outcome of host-parasite interactions over time. After host shifts, the lack of co-evolution can have a drastic impact on novel host populations. Nevertheless, it is known that Western honey bee (Apismellifera) populations can cope with host-shifted ectoparasitic mites (Varroa destructor) by means o...
Article
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To the Editor — Access to pesticide-use data is essential to accurately evaluate the adverse effects of pesticides on human and ecosystem health. In Europe, applicators are usually required to record the location and date of pesticide applications1. A subset of these data is periodically sampled to produce heavily aggregated estimates of pesticide...
Article
Multiple mating by both sexes is common among sexually reproducing animals. Small hive beetles (SHB), Aethina tumida, are parasites of bee nests endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and have become a widespread invasive species. Despite the considerable economic damages they can cause, their basic biology remains poorly understood. Here we show that male...
Article
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There is clear evidence for wild insect declines globally. Habitat loss, climate change, pests, pathogens and environmental pollution have all been shown to cause detrimental effects on insects. However, interactive effects between these stressors may be the key to understanding reported declines. Here, we review the literature on pesticide and pat...
Article
There is clear evidence for global and unsustainable high losses of managed Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, colonies raising major concerns about the sustainability of pollination services and food security. Here, we address a conflicting selection scenario in workers to better understand life-history trade-offs underlying colony losses. Due to...
Article
Full-text available
There is clear evidence for global and unsustainable high losses of managed Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, colonies raising major concerns about the sustainability of pollination services and food security. Here, we address a conflicting selection scenario in workers to better understand life-history trade-offs underlying colony losses. Due to...
Article
Honey stores of Apis mellifera colonies are replaced with sugar water by beekeepers, which may result in malnutrition. Nutritional supplements have been developed, but the importance of bacterial probiotics and vitamins is poorly understood. Given that supplementary feeding with vitamins and probiotics may enhance worker weight and longevity, this...
Article
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Gut microbiota are known to foster pollen digestion in honey bee workers, Apis mellifera, thereby enhancing longevity and body weight gain. However, it is currently not known how longevity and body weight gain are effected when gut microbiota are reduced in bees with or without access to pollen. Here, using a hoarding cage setup with freshly emerge...
Article
Introduction Host shifts of parasites can have devastating effects on novel hosts. One remarkable example is that of the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, which has shifted hosts from Eastern honey bees (Apis cerana) to Western honey bees (Apis mellifera) and posed a major global threat to apiculture and wild honey bees. Objectives and methods...
Article
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Global insect biodiversity declines due to reduced fitness are linked to interactions between environmental stressors. In social insects, inclusive fitness depends on successful mating of reproductives, i.e. males and queens, and efficient collaborative brood care by workers. Therefore, interactive effects between malnutrition and environmental pol...
Article
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A key to healthy beekeeping is the Health Status Index (HIS) inspired by EFSA’s Healthy-B toolbox which we will make fully operational, with the active collaboration of beekeepers, by facilitating the coordinated and harmonised flow of data from various sources and by testing and validating each component thoroughly. We envisage a step�by-step expa...
Article
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Viruses are omnipresent, yet the knowledge on drivers of viral prevalence in wild host populations is often limited. Biotic factors, such as sympatric managed host species, as well as abiotic factors, such as climatic variables, are likely to impact viral prevalence. Managed and wild bees, which harbor several multi-host viruses with a mostly fecal...
Article
Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) play key olfactory roles in insect mating, and can therefore be used for pest control. However, the CHC profiles of adult small hive beetles (SHB), Aethina tumida, are currently unknown, even though this widespread invasive species threatens agriculture and wild bee populations. Here we show that CHC profiles can diffe...
Article
The small hive beetle (SHB), Aethina tumida, a parasite of honey bees is endemic to Sub-Saharan Africa and has become a global invasive pest. Adequate surveillance methods based on trapping methods need testing and verification of their efficacy. We tested the efficacy of top frame supplied cardboard traps. The efficacy was extremely low (0.9%) and...
Article
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Invasive species are of major concern globally because they affect human health and food security. To limit their spread and impact, locally and internationally concerted efforts are required. This holds true for invasive pests of pollinators, such as small hive beetles (Aethina tumida, Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), thus prompting the initiation of a C...
Article
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Sexual reproduction is common to almost all multi-cellular organisms and can be compromised by environmental pollution, thereby affecting entire populations. Even though there is consensus that neonicotinoid insecticides can impact non-target animal fertility, their possible impact on male mating success is currently unknown in bees. Here, we show...
Article
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Pressures from multiple, sometimes interacting, stressors can have negative consequences to important ecosystem-service providing species like the western honey bee ( Apis mellifera ). The introduced parasite Varroa destructor and the neonicotinoid class of insecticides each represent important, nearly ubiquitous biotic and abiotic stressors to hon...
Article
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Invasive species are a major driver of ecological and environmental changes that affect human health, food security, and natural biodiversity. The success and impact of biological invasions depend on adaptations to novel abiotic and biotic selective pressures. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptations in invasive parasitic species ar...
Article
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Pesticides and pathogens are known drivers of declines in global entomofauna. However, interactions between pesticides and viruses, which could range from antagonistic, over additive to synergistic, are poorly understood in ants. Here, we show that in ants the impact of single and combined pesticide and virus stressors can vary across castes and at...
Article
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The BEEBOOK project arose from discussions at early COLOSS (Prevention of Honey Bee COlony LOSSes) meetings. The vision was, and still is, to develop a definitive inventory of standard techniques and methods in honey bee research to ensure that studies performed by different laboratories around the world would be directly comparable. The manual, ti...
Article
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In a globalized world, parasites are often brought in contact with new potential hosts. When parasites successfully shift host, severe diseases can emerge at a large cost to society. However, the evolutionary processes leading to successful shifts are rarely understood, hindering risk assessment, prevention, or mitigation of their effects. Here, we...
Article
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A reduction in floral resource abundance and diversity is generally observed in agro-ecosystems, along with widespread exposure to pesticides. Therefore, a better understanding on how the availability and quality of pollen diets can modulate honeybee sensitivity to pesticides is required. For that purpose, we evaluated the toxicity of acute exposur...
Article
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1. Agricultural chemicals such as neonicotinoid insecticides are believed to be one important factor responsible for the recent reduction in health of pollinating insects like the western honeybee (Apis mellifera). However, effects of neonicotinoids on male (drone) honeybee health remain severely understudied. 2. We examined for the first time the...
Article
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Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) cover insects’ bodies and play important roles in chemical communication, including nestmate recognition, for social insects. To enter colonies of a social host species, parasites may acquire host-specific CHCs or covertly maintain their own CHC profile by lowering its quantity. However, the chemical profile of small h...
Preprint
Full-text available
PoshBee is a 5-year funded project (2018-2023) that aims to support healthy bee populations, sustainable beekeeping, and consequently pollination for crops and wildflowers across Europe. To do this we take a range of approaches, from the laboratory to the field, from molecules to ecosystems, and from fundamental science to risk assessment. This doc...
Article
Full-text available
The ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor, is unarguably the leading cause of honeybee (Apis mellifera) mortality worldwide through its role as a vector for lethal viruses, in particular, strains of the Deformed wing virus (DWV) and Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) complexes. Several honeybee populations across Europe have well-documented adaptatio...
Article
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Citizen Science contributes significantly to the conservation of biodiversity, but its application to honey bee research has remained minimal. Even though certain European honey bee (Apis mellifera) populations are known to naturally survive Varroa destructor infestations, it is unclear how widespread or common such populations are. Such colonies a...
Preprint
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This protocol was developed for the COST-Action “Super-B”, whose purpose was to coordinate research, outreach and policy towards sustainable pollination1-3. The protocol addresses the detection of parasites and pathogens across bee species, as one of several possible drivers of bee decline4,5. It consists of four major components: 1. A sample colle...
Article
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The world is facing precipitous declines in abundance and diversity of the global entomofauna (Cardoso & al. 2020). There is consensus that anthropogenic pollution by agrochemicals is one of the most important drivers of recent declines (Sánchez-Bayo & Wyckhuys 2019). Agrochemicals such as fungicides, herbicides, and pesticides are used in vast amo...
Article
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A dynamic continuum exists from free-living environmental microbes to strict host-associated symbionts that are vertically inherited. However, knowledge of the forces that drive transitions in symbiotic lifestyle and transmission mode is lacking. Arsenophonus is a diverse clade of bacterial symbionts, comprising reproductive parasites to coevolving...
Article
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Multiple global change pressures, and their interplay, cause plant-pollinator extinctions and modify species assemblages and interactions. This may alter the risks of pathogen host shifts, intra- or interspecific pathogen spread, and emergence of novel population or community epidemics. Flowers are hubs for pathogen transmission. Consequently, the...
Article
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Insecticides are contributing to global insect declines, thereby creating demand to understand the mechanisms underlying reduced fitness. In the eusocial Hymenoptera, inclusive fitness depends on successful mating of male sexuals (drones) and efficient collaborative brood care by female workers. Therefore, sublethal insecticide effects on sperm and...
Article
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The ongoing loss of global biodiversity is endangering ecosystem functioning and human food security. While environmental pollutants are well known to reduce fertility, the potential effects of common neonicotinoid insecticides on insect fertility remain poorly understood. Here, we show that field-realistic neonicotinoid exposure can drastically im...
Article
Full-text available
In eusocial honey bees, Apis mellifera , diet, gut microbiota and nestmates can all contribute to the health of freshly emerged individual workers, but their relative importance for longevity and body weight is currently unknown. Here, we show that diet is most relevant, followed by gut microbiota and the presence of nestmates. Freshly emerged work...
Article
Full-text available
The ubiquitous use of agrochemicals is one driver for the ongoing loss of insect biomass and diversity. Data show that field-realistic concentrations of neonicoti-noid insecticides can negatively affect both population density and the fitness of solitary bees. However, the underlying mechanisms for these effects remain poorly understood. Here, usin...
Article
PoshBee is a 5-year funded project (2018-2023) that aims to support healthy bee populations, sustainable beekeeping, and consequently pollination for crops and wildflowers across Europe. To do this we take a range of approaches, from the laboratory to the field, from molecules to ecosystems, and from fundamental science to risk assessment. This doc...
Article
Full-text available
Comparative studies of genetic diversity and population structure can shed light on the ecological and evolutionary factors governing host-parasite interactions. Even though invasive parasites are considered of major biological importance, little is known about their adaptative potential when infesting the new hosts. Here, the genetic diversificati...
Article
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Parasite host shifts can impose a high selective pressure on novel hosts. Even though the coevolved systems can reveal fundamental aspects of host-parasite interactions, research often focuses on the new host-parasite relationships. This holds true for two ectoparasitic mite species, Varroa destructor and Varroa jacobsonii, which have shifted hosts...
Article
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The ubiquitous use of pesticides is one major driver for the current loss of biodiversity, and the common practice of simultaneously applying multiple agrochemicals may further contribute. Insect toxicology currently has a strong focus on survival to determine the potential hazards of a chemical routinely used in risk evaluations. However, studies...
Preprint
Full-text available
Populations of European honeybee subspecies, Apis mellifera , have the ability to adapt naturally to the ectoparasitic mite, Varroa destructor . It is possible that a tolerance to mite-vectored viruses may contribute to colony survival. If this is the case, surviving populations should show lower virus titers and prevalence compared to susceptible...
Article
Full-text available
The small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray, is an invasive pest that has spread globally. Western honey bees, Apis mellifera Linnaeus (Hymenoptera: Apidae), are considered the most important host and infestations can lead to collapse of colonies. Larvae feed on honey, pollen, and brood inside the hive and leave the hive as postfeeding wandering l...
Article
Small hive beetles (SHB, Aethina tumida Murray, Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) are parasites of social bee colonies endemic to sub-Saharan Africa and have become an invasive species. Even though the global spread of SHB seems inevitable, the origin of novel introductions and their impact on new host populations need to be investigated to foster mitigatio...
Article
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The socio-economic impacts of COVID-19 on society have yet to be truly revealed; there is no doubt that the pandemic has severely affected the daily lives of most of humanity. It is to be expected that the research activities of scientists could be impacted to varying degrees, but no data exist on how COVID-19 has affected research specifically. He...
Preprint
Full-text available
A dynamic continuum exists from free-living environmental microbes to strict host associated symbionts that are vertically inherited. However, knowledge of the forces that drive transitions in the modes by which symbioses form is lacking. Arsenophonus is a diverse clade of bacterial symbionts, comprising reproductive parasites to coevolving obligat...
Article
Full-text available
The global trade of honey bee hive products has raised concern about pathogen transmission. However, the efficacy of hive products as virus vehicles is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the transmission capacity of hive products for Deformed wing virus genotype A (DWV-A) in a fully-crossed hoarding cage experiment and estimated the transmiss...
Article
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Wild and managed bees are essential for global food security and the maintenance of biodiversity. At present, the conservation of wild bees is hampered by a huge shortfall in knowledge about the trends and status of individual species mainly due to their large diversity and variation in life histories. In contrast, the managed Western honey bee Api...
Article
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Starvation resistance, or the ability to survive periods without food, can shed light on selection pressure imposed by food scarcity, including chances to invade new regions as a result of human transport. Surprisingly, little information is known about starvation resistance for invasive insect species. Given that native and invasive populations di...
Article
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Olfaction is key to many insects. Odorant receptors (ORs) stand among the key chemosensory receptors mediating the detection of pheromones and kairomones. Small hive beetles (SHBs), Aethina tumida, are parasites of social bee colonies and olfactory cues are especially important for host finding. However, how interactions with their hosts may have s...
Article
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The widespread prophylactic usage of neonicotinoid insecticides has a clear impact on non-target organisms. However, the possible effects of long-term exposure on soil-dwelling organisms are still poorly understood especially for social insects with long-living queens. Here, we show that effects of chronic exposure to the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam...
Article
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The COLOSS BEEBOOK project arose from discussions at meetings of the COLOSS (Prevention of Honey Bee COlony LOSSes; www.coloss.org) association, which was established in 2008 to explore all possible reasons for honey bee colony losses (Williams et al., 2012). Those unfamiliar with the concept of the COLOSS BEEBOOK are welcome to consult the introdu...
Article
Full-text available
The main biological threat to the western honeybee (Apis mellifera) is the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, largely because it vectors lethal epidemics of honeybee viruses that, in the absence of this mite, are relatively innocuous. The severe pathology is a direct consequence of excessive virus titres caused by this novel transmission route. Howe...
Article
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Emerging infectious diseases are often the products of host shifts, where a pathogen jumps from its original host to a novel species. Viruses in particular cross species barriers frequently. Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV) and deformed wing virus (DWV) are viruses described in honey bees (Apis mellifera) with broad host ranges. Ants scavenging on...
Article
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Interactions between stressors are involved in the decline of wild species and losses of managed ones. Those interactions are often assumed to be synergistic, and per se of the same nature, even though susceptibility can vary within a single species. However, empirical measures of interaction effects across levels of susceptibility remain scarce. H...
Article
Insect wing deformities can be caused by viruses, mites and other environmental stressors during development. Here, we conducted differential diagnostics of deformed wings in small hive beetles, Aethina tumida (SHB). Adults with and without deformed wings from individual and mass rearing were evaluated for mites, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, and for d...