Peter M Narins

Peter M Narins
University of California, Los Angeles | UCLA · Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology and the Center for Tropical Research

B.S.E.E., M.E.E., PhD Cornell University

About

242
Publications
48,766
Reads
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7,878
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2005 - present
November 1993 - December 1993
University of Cape Town
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Carried out collaborative research with Professor Jennifer Jarvis in Gobabeb, Namibia
August 1988 - present
Universidad de la República de Uruguay
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Guided graduate students, provided support and equipment, consulted, etc.

Publications

Publications (242)
Article
Full-text available
Sound communication plays a vital role in frog reproduction, in which vocal advertisement is generally the domain of males. Females are typically silent, but in a few anuran species they can produce a feeble reciprocal call or rapping sounds during courtship. Males of concave-eared torrent frogs (Odorrana tormota) have demonstrated ultrasonic commu...
Article
Full-text available
Several groups of mammals such as bats, dolphins and whales are known to produce ultrasonic signals which are used for navigation and hunting by means of echolocation, as well as for communication. In contrast, frogs and birds produce sounds during night- and day-time hours that are audible to humans; their sounds are so pervasive that together wit...
Chapter
Anurans are highly vocal species that rely on acoustic communication for social behaviors. The advertisement (mating) calls of many anurans contain considerable energy within the predominant spectral range of traffic and other anthropogenic-noise sources. Whether and how these noise sources affect reproductive success and species viability is uncle...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory signals are often used by forest species to attract mates, define and defend territories, and locate prey, and thus these signals may be monitored and used to estimate species presence, richness and acoustic complexity of a patch of habitat. We analyzed recordings from a biodiversity hotspot in the rainforests of Batang Ai National Park in...
Article
Anthropogenic noise is widespread in nature and has been shown to produce a plethora of impacts on wildlife. Sounds play a fundamental role in the lives of amphibians, with species relying on acoustic communication for social and reproductive behaviour, and thus noise can potentially interfere with these activities. Here, we provide a literature re...
Article
The Reflections series takes a look back on historical articles from The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America that have had a significant impact on the science and practice of acoustics.
Article
Full-text available
Effective communication requires a match among signal characteristics, environmental conditions, and receptor tuning and decoding. The degree of matching, however, can vary, among others due to different selective pressures affecting the communication components. For evolutionary novelties, strong selective pressures are likely to act upon the sign...
Article
The Silver Medal is presented to individuals, without age limitation, for contributions to the advancement of science, engineering, or human welfare through the application of acoustic principles, or through research accomplishment in acoustics.
Article
Full-text available
The principle of acoustic allometry—the larger the animal, the lower its calls' fundamental frequency—is generally observed across terrestrial mammals. Moreover, according to the Acoustic Adaptation Hypothesis, open habitats favor the propagation of high-frequency calls compared to habitats with complex vegetational structures. We carried out playb...
Article
Despite the predominance of low-frequency hearing in anuran amphibians, a few frog species have evolved high-frequency communication within certain environmental contexts. Huia cavitympanum is the most remarkable anuran with regard to upper frequency limits; it is the first frog species known to emit exclusively ultrasonic signals. Characteristics...
Article
The vocal repertoire of males of Cornufer vitianus from the lowland mangrove forests of Viwa Island, off the coast of Viti Levu, Fiji is described. All calls were placed into two categories: those with a high fundamental frequency, and those with a low fundamental frequency. Within each category, there is relatively high call variation. Individual...
Article
Anurans (frogs and toads) are the most vocal amphibians. In most species, only males produce advertisement calls for defending territories and attracting mates. Female vocalizations are the exceptions among frogs, however in the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) both males and females produce distinct vocalizations. The matched filter hypothesis...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic disturbance is a major cause of the biodiversity crisis. Nevertheless, the role of anthropogenic substrate vibrations in disrupting animal behavior is poorly understood. Amphibians comprise the terrestrial vertebrates most sensitive to vibrations, and since communication is crucial to their survival and reproduction, they are a suitab...
Chapter
Amphibians have been defined as quadrupedal vertebrates having two occipital condyles on the skull and no more than one sacral vertebra. Although this morphologically based definition continues to be valid and accurate, we now know that, in addition, all amphibians studied to date exhibit extreme sensitivity to substrate-borne vibrations. In this c...
Chapter
In the past 5 years since the publication of the forerunner of the present volume, we have witnessed a dramatic increase in research, published and ongoing, in the field of vibrational communication—the range of taxa studied and of methods used is expanding rapidly, the questions asked are multiplying and are more sharply delineated. This internati...
Book
Full-text available
This volume is a self-contained companion piece to Studying Vibrational Communication, published in 2014 within the same series. The field has expanded considerably since then, and has even acquired a name of its own: biotremology. In this context, the book reports on new concepts in this fascinating discipline, and features chapters on state-of-th...
Book
Full-text available
This volume is a self-contained companion piece to Studying Vibrational Communication, published in 2014 within the same series. The field has expanded considerably since then, and has even acquired a name of its own: biotremology. In this context, the book reports on new concepts in this fascinating discipline, and features chapters on state-of-t...
Article
Full-text available
The agricultural pest, Homalodisca vitripennis, relies on vibrational communication through plants for species identification, location, and courtship. Their vibrational signal exhibits a dominant frequency between 80 and 120 Hz, with higher frequency, lower intensity harmonics occurring approximately every 100 Hz. However, previous research reveal...
Article
Full-text available
Anuran amphibians are common model organisms in bioacoustics and neurobiology. To date, however, most available methods for studying auditory processing in frogs are highly invasive and thus do not allow for longitudinal study designs, nor do they provide a global view of the brain, which substantially limits the questions that can be addressed. Th...
Article
Terrestrial frogs and toads produce conspicuous vocalizations that may be accompanied by substrate-borne vibrations [1]. Unlike airborne sound, these substrate-borne components are relatively understudied in animal communication. Some anurans exploit the forest floor as a relatively noiseless communication channel in which to propagate call-derived...
Article
ABSTRACT: Adult males of the African treefrog species Leptopelis flavomaculatus occur in either brown or green color morphs. In this study, we investigated whether the two color morphs of breeding males of L. flavomaculatus differ in traits other than color. We examined call differences (dominant frequencies and call durations), call-site selection...
Presentation
Full-text available
Anthropogenic disturbance has been pointed out as one of the major causes of the world biodiversity crisis. In particular, noise pollution is a potentially underestimated threat, expected to increase with urban expansion. Anthropic activity also produces substrate vibrations, but their possible impact on animal communication has not been considered...
Presentation
Full-text available
Acoustic communication is a key feature in the life-history of anuran amphibians. The advertisement call of males serves to attract female mates and to repel male competitors. Anuran amphibians have long been recognized as excellent model organisms in bioacoustics and neurobiology, thanks to their relatively simple brain organization and stereotypi...
Presentation
Full-text available
Amphibian bioacoustics may be thought to have originated with the first published acoustic playback experiments with frogs 60 years ago. Martof and Thompson (1958, Behavior 13:243-58) and Littlejohn and Michaud (1959, Tex. Jour. Sci.11:86-92) showed that male calls of Pseudacris nigrita in Georgia are effective in attracting conspecific females, an...
Presentation
Amphibian bioacoustics may be thought to have originated with the first published acoustic playback experiments with frogs 60 years ago. Martof and Thompson (1958, Behavior 13:243–258) and Littlejohn and Michaud (1959, Tex. Jour. Sci.11:86–92) showed that male calls of Pseudacris nigrita in Georgia are effective in attracting conspecific females, a...
Article
The agricultural pest, glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca vitripennis, relies primarily on successful vibrational communication across its home plant. Males and females engage in a vibrational duet to identify correct species, attractiveness of mate, and location on the plant. The signal produced by these animals has a dominant frequenc...
Article
Full-text available
Many animals use sounds produced by conspecifics for mate identification. Female insects and anuran amphibians, for instance, use acoustic cues to localize, orient toward and approach conspecific males prior to mating. Here we present a novel technique that utilizes multiple, distributed sound-indication devices and a miniature LED backpack to visu...
Article
Males of the coqui treefrog, Eleutherodactylus coqui, produce a distinct two-note 'co-qui' advertisement call from sunset to midnight throughout most of the year. Previous work established that both the spectrotemporal aspects of the call and the frequency of highest inner-ear sensitivity change with altitude above sea level. These variations are s...
Article
Toads occupy underground refugia during periods of daily or seasonal inactivity, emerging only during rainfall [1 • Pinder A.W. • Storey K.B. • Ultsch G.R. Hibernation and aestivation.in: Feder M.E. Burggren W.W. Environmental Physiology of the Amphibians. University of Chicago Press, Chicago1992: 250-274 • Google Scholar ]. We test the hypothesi...
Article
Full-text available
Frogs and toads are capable of producing calls at potentially damaging levels that exceed 110 dB SPL at 50 cm. Most frog species have internally coupled ears (ICE) in which the tympanic membranes (TyMs) communicate directly via the large, permanently open Eustachian tubes, resulting in an inherently directional asymmetrical pressure-difference rece...
Article
Full-text available
ICE stands for internally coupled ears. More than half of the terrestrial vertebrates, such as frogs, lizards, and birds, as well as many insects, are equipped with ICE that utilize an air-filled cavity connecting the two eardrums. Its effect is pronounced and twofold. On the basis of a solid experimental and mathematical foundation, it is known th...
Presentation
Full-text available
Animal communication occurs when a signal generated by one individual is transmitted through an appropriate channel and results in a behavioral change in a second individual. We have explored specific morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations in a wide variety of taxa that appear to have evolved specifically to tailor and sculpt intr...
Chapter
Infrasonic and seismic communication in terrestrial vertebrates is generally poorly known. Moreover, studies of these communication modalities have been restricted to relatively few vertebrate groups. In this chapter we begin with the non-Afrotherian vertebrates and review what is known about their infrasonic (including birds and mammals) and seism...
Chapter
This chapter consists of two parts. In the first part, a compact tutorial exposition of the principles of matched filtering for the biological scientist is introduced. The concept of matched filtering for detecting desired signals buried in noisy measurement signals is presented. It is shown that the matched filter is another name for the correlati...
Conference Paper
Several studies have demonstrated that delays associated with evoked otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) largely originate from filter delays of resonant elements in the inner ear. However, one vertebrate group is an exception: Anuran (frogs and toads) amphibian OAEs exhibit relatively long delays (several milliseconds), yet relatively broad tuning. These...
Article
In his Ph.D. thesis, Albert described his elegant behavioral study demonstrating that two ears are necessary for frogs to localize sound. Next, he elucidated a series of mechanisms in the frog CNS that is responsible for encoding sound source direction. Inspired by this work, we examined some of the peripheral mechanisms involved in sound processin...
Article
Full-text available
Animal acoustic communication often takes the form of complex sequences, made up of multiple distinct acoustic units. Apart from the well-known example of birdsong, other animals such as insects, amphibians, and mammals (including bats, rodents, primates, and cetaceans) also generate complex acoustic sequences. Occasionally, such as with birdsong,...
Article
Temperature affects nearly all biological processes, including acoustic signal production and reception. Here, we report on advertisement calls of the Puerto Rican coqui frog (Eleutherodactylus coqui) that were recorded along an altitudinal gradient and compared these with similar recordings along the same altitudinal gradient obtained 23 years ear...
Chapter
Full-text available
The frequency range of hearing in fishes and frogs historically has been thought to be confined to relatively low frequencies in comparison to that of mammals. However, within the last 20 years, the audiograms of several fish and frog species have been shown to encompass ultrasonic (US) frequencies. Moreover, these animals have been shown to respon...
Article
Full-text available
Many species of animals, including man, face the formidable task of communicating in noisy environments. In this paper, I shall discuss the effects of biotic, synthetic and anthropogenic noise on the calling behavior of anuran amphibians. Moreover, the role of spectral, temporal and spatial separation in minimizing masking by background noise will...
Article
Many species of animals, including man, face the formidable task of communicating in noisy environments. In this talk, I shall discuss the effects of anthropogenic (man-made) noise on the calling behavior of anuran amphibians. Moreover, the role of spectral, temporal, and spatial separation in minimizing masking by background noise will be examined...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory hair cells in the amphibian papilla (APHCs) of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens pipiens, have a significantly higher permeability to water than that observed in mammalian hair cells. The insensitivity of water permeability in frog hair cells to extracellular mercury suggests that an amphibian homologue of the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4)...
Article
Georg von Békésy was one of the first comparative auditory researchers. He not only studied basilar membrane (BM) movements in a range of mammals of widely different sizes, he also worked on the chicken basilar papilla and the frog middle ear. We show that, in mammals, at least, his data do not differ from those that could be collected using modern...
Article
Full-text available
Three species of anuran amphibians (Odorrana tormota, O. livida and Huia cavitympanum) have recently been found to detect ultrasounds. We compared morphological data collected from the ultrasound detecting species with data from Rana pipiens, a frog with a typical anuran upper cut-off frequency of ca. 3 kHz. In addition, we examined the ears of two...
Chapter
Golden moles are nocturnal, surface-foraging mammals with rudimentary vision. Several species possess massively hypertrophied mallei that presumably confer low-frequency, substrate-vibration sensitivity through inertial bone conduction. When foraging, the Namib Desert golden mole, Eremitalpa granti namibensis, typically moves between sand mounds to...
Article
Full-text available
During female mate choice, both the male's phenotype and resources (e.g. his nest) contribute to the chooser's fitness. Animals other than humans are not known to advertise resource characteristics to potential mates through vocal communication; although in some species of anurans and birds, females do evaluate male qualities through vocal communic...
Article
Full-text available
Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we measured changes in membrane capacitance (ΔC m) in two subsets of hair cells from the leopard frog amphibian papilla (AP): the low-frequency (100–500 Hz), rostral hair cells and the high-frequency (500–1200 Hz), caudal hair cells, in order to investigate tonotopic differences in exocytosis. Depolarization...
Article
Three species of anuran amphibians (Odorrana tormota, Odorrana livida and Huia cavitympanum) have recently been found to detect ultrasounds. We employed immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy to examine several morphometrics of the inner ear of these ultrasonically sensitive species. We compared morphological data collected from the ultrasoun...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Environmental influences on acoustic communication in frogs.
Article
Many species of animals, including man, face the formidable task of communicating in naturally noisy environments. The effects of noise on both the calling behavior of frogs and the temporal, and spectral filtering ability of the amphibian auditory pathway are discussed. Moreover, the role of spectral, temporal, and spatial separation in minimizing...
Article
Full-text available
We present the first data on the vocalizations of large odorous frogs (Odorrana graminea, previously Odorrana livida), from southern China. The males produce diverse broadband signals most of which contain ultrasonic harmonics. Six basic call-types were identified based on the number of call notes, fundamental frequency, call/note duration, frequen...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Golden moles are nocturnal, surface-foraging mammals with rudimentary vision. Several species possess massively hypertrophied mallei that presumably confer substrate-vibration sensitivity through inertial bone conduction. When foraging, Eremitalpa granti namibensis moves between sand mounds topped with dune grass that contain most of the living bio...
Article
Full-text available
The structure of the environment surrounding signal emission produces different patterns of degradation and attenuation. The expected adjustment of calls to ensure signal transmission in an environment was formalized in the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Within this framework, most studies considered anuran calls as fixed attributes determined by...
Conference Paper
Golden moles are nocturnal, surface-foraging mammals with rudimentary vision, several of which possess massively hypertrophied mallei that presumably confer low-frequency, substrate-vibration sensitivity through inertial bone conduction. Based on middle ear anatomy, the ossicular mass distribution and the anchorage points, we have hypothesized that...
Article
Full-text available
The concave-eared torrent frog, Odorrana tormota, has evolved the extraordinary ability to communicate ultrasonically (i.e., using frequencies > 20 kHz), and electrophysiological experiments have demonstrated that neurons in the frog's midbrain (torus semicircularis) respond to frequencies up to 34 kHz. However, at this time, it is unclear which re...
Article
Full-text available
The structure of the environment determines patterns of signal degradation and attenuation, potentially affecting communication. The expected adjustment in call structure improving signal transmission in an environment was formalized in the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Within this framework, most studies considered anuran calls as fixed attribut...
Article
When amphibian papillar hair cells (APHCs) of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens pipiens, are osmotically challenged, they exhibit a characteristically asymmetric (rectifying) response: small decreases (5%, or less) in the extracellular solution's osmolarity do not significantly affect the cells' volume; larger decreases produce a relatively slow volum...
Article
Full-text available
The frog inner ear contains three regions that are sensitive to airborne sound and which are functionally distinct. (1) The responses of nerve fibres innervating the low-frequency, rostral part of the amphibian papilla (AP) are complex. Electrical tuning of hair cells presumably contributes to the frequency selectivity of these responses. (2) The c...
Article
Seismic signal production and detection are well documented in many species of fish, reptiles, amphibians, a few small mammals, and most recently, the elephant. Seismic signals are produced either as a result of locomotion or percussion or by the coupling of acoustic vocalizations with the ground. These signals may subserve a variety of important b...
Article
All five classes of vertebrates have hearing mechanisms based on hair cells. These mechanisms vary at several levels. Categorical differences in anatomy and function are found among classes of vertebrates. The same applies within classes, but more variation has been found among fishes, for example, than among birds. Such variation is reflected in h...
Article
Full-text available
Vertebrates inhabit and communicate acoustically in most natural environments. We review the influence of environmental factors on the hearing sensitivity of terrestrial vertebrates, and on the anatomy and mechanics of the middle ears. Evidence suggests that both biotic and abiotic environmental factors affect the evolution of bandwidth and frequen...
Article
Full-text available
Acoustic communication involves both the generation and the detection of a signal. In the coqui frog (Eleutherodactylus coqui), it is known that the spectral contents of its calls systematically change with altitude above sea level. Here, distortion product otoacoustic emissions are used to assess the frequency range over which the inner ear is sen...
Article
Full-text available
Sound stimulates the tympanic membrane (TM) of anuran amphibians through multiple, poorly understood pathways. It is conceivable that interactions between the internal and external inputs to the TM contribute to the nonlinear effects that noise is known to produce at higher levels of the auditory pathway. To explore this issue, we conducted measure...
Article
Full-text available
Huia cavitympanum, an endemic Bornean frog, is the first amphibian species known to emit exclusively ultrasonic (i.e., >20 kHz) vocal signals. To test the hypothesis that these frogs use purely ultrasonic vocalizations for intraspecific communication, we performed playback experiments with male frogs in their natural calling sites. We found that th...
Article
Full-text available
The majority of anuran amphibians (frogs and toads) use acoustic communication to mediate sexual behavior and reproduction. Generally, females find and select their mates using acoustic cues provided by males in the form of conspicuous advertisement calls. In these species, vocal signal production and reception are intimately tied to successful rep...