Peter Kyne

Peter Kyne
Charles Darwin University | CDU · Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods

About

159
Publications
40,228
Reads
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4,578
Citations
Citations since 2017
84 Research Items
3459 Citations
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20172018201920202021202220230200400600800
Introduction
Peter Kyne currently works at the Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University. Peter does research in Zoology, Marine Biology and Ecology.

Publications

Publications (159)
Article
Full-text available
Area-based conservation is essential to safeguard declining biodiversity. Several approaches have been developed for identifying networks of globally important areas based on the delineation of sites or seascapes of importance for various elements of biodiversity (e.g., birds, marine mammals). Sharks, rays, and chimaeras are facing a biodiversity c...
Article
Full-text available
The delineation of subspecies is important in the evaluation and protection of biodiversity. Subspecies delineation is hampered by inconsistently applied criteria and a lack of agreement and shifting standards on how a subspecies should be defined. The Australian endemic Yellow Chat (Epthianura crocea) is split into three subspecies (E. c. crocea,...
Article
Chondrichthyan fishes are among the most threatened vertebrates on the planet because many species have slow life histories that are outpaced by intense fishing. The Western Central Atlantic Ocean, which includes the Greater Caribbean, is a hotspot of chondrichthyan biodiversity and abundance, but has been characterized by extensive shark and ray f...
Preprint
Full-text available
The southwest Indian Ocean (SWIO) is a hotspot of endemic and evolutionarily distinct sharks and rays. We summarise the extinction risk of the sharks and rays endemic to coastal, shelf, and slope waters of the SWIO and adjacent waters (Namibia to Kenya, including SWIO islands). Thirteen of 70 species (19%) are threatened: one is Critically Endanger...
Article
Knowledge of where a threatened species occurs in a landscape is crucial for determining its habitat requirements and informing its conservation planning and management. We conducted the first broad-scale survey of the Endangered Alligator Rivers Yellow Chat Epthianura crocea tunneyi across much of its known range on drying coastal floodplains in n...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chondrichthyan fishes are among the most threatened vertebrates on the planet because many species have slow life histories that are outpaced by intense fishing. The Western Central Atlantic Ocean, which includes the greater Caribbean, is a hotspot of chondrichthyan biodiversity and abundance, but is historically characterized by extensive shark an...
Article
Full-text available
Sawfishes are among the most threatened families of marine fishes and are susceptible to incidental capture in net fisheries. Since bycatch reduction devices currently used in trawl fisheries are not effective at reducing sawfish catches, new methods to minimise sawfish bycatch are needed. Ideally, these should affect sawfish behaviour and prevent...
Preprint
Full-text available
The southwest Indian Ocean (SWIO) is a hotspot of endemic and evolutionarily distinct sharks and rays. We summarise the extinction risk of the sharks and rays endemic to coastal, shelf, and slope waters of the SWIO and adjacent waters (Namibia to Kenya, including SWIO islands). Thirteen of 70 species (19%) are threatened: one is Critically Endanger...
Article
Full-text available
The conservation of threatened elasmobranchs in tropical regions is challenging due to high local reliance on aquatic and marine resources. Due primarily to fishing pressure, river sharks (Glyphis) and sawfishes (Pristidae) have experienced large population declines in the Indo-Pacific. Papua New Guinea (PNG) may offer a refuge for these species, a...
Article
Mapping the various anthropogenic threats to species is a key tool to support and guide effective decisions for management of these threats. While there are a range of approaches to mapping threats, the extent to which these provide consistent or differing results has not been investigated. The overall aim of this study was to address this gap by e...
Article
• Sawfish (Pristidae) are considered to be among the most threatened families of elasmobranch (sharks and rays). There is a need to gather information on the status of poorly known sawfish populations to assist in global recovery initiatives. • This study used interviews with local fishers to investigate the presence of sawfish in southern Papua Ne...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Assessment of the conservation status of the Sharpfin Houndshark, Triakis acutipinna
Article
• Pressures on coastal ecosystems are increasing and aquatic species that are restricted to these habitats are facing the threat of extinction. However, the true extent of many threatened and rare aquatic species, especially elasmobranchs, remains unclear due to high levels of data deficiency and poor efficacy of traditional survey methods. Sawfish...
Article
An annotated checklist of chondrichthyan fishes (sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) occurring in South African waters is presented. The checklist is the result of decades of research and on-going systematic revisions of the regional fauna. The chondrichthyan fauna of South Africa is one of the richest in the world with 191 species, comprising 50 famil...
Article
Full-text available
Extinctions on land are often inferred from sparse sightings over time, but this technique is ill-suited for wide-ranging species. We develop a space-for-time approach to track the spatial contraction and drivers of decline of sawfishes. These iconic and endangered shark-like rays were once found in warm, coastal waters of 90 nations and are now pr...
Article
Full-text available
The largetooth sawfish Pristis pristis is a Critically Endangered, once widespread shark-like ray. The species is now extinct or severely depleted in many former parts of its range and is protected in some other range states where populations persist. The likelihood of collecting substantial new biological information is now low. Here, we review al...
Article
Full-text available
Overfishing is the primary cause of marine defaunation, yet declines in and increasing extinction risks of individual species are difficult to measure, particularly for the largest predators found in the high seas. Here we calculate two well-established indicators to track progress towards Aichi Biodiversity Targets and Sustainable Development Goal...
Chapter
Rhino rays comprise 64 species of shark-like rays from five families. Over two-thirds (69%) are threatened with extinction with 41% Critically Endangered (these face an extremely high risk of extinction). All sawfishes and giant guitarfishes, 90% of wedgefishes, 59% of guitarfishes, and 38% of banjo rays are threatened. The major driver of endanger...
Chapter
Due to the ongoing and increasing demand for their products, chondrichthyan populations are often subject to intense exploitation by many small-scale and industrial fisheries worldwide. This situation generates an urgent need for conservation and management of many chondrichthyan species. This includes the Eastern Pacific round rays of the family U...
Article
Ghost sharks (subclass Holocephali) remain a largely data-poor group of cartilaginous fishes. The general paucity of attention may partially be related to identification and unresolved taxonomic issues, occurrence in the deep oceans, and their low value and interest in fisheries (which some notable exceptions). Here, we synthesize and assess the ex...
Article
The shark-like rays of the family Rhinidae (wedgefishes) are globally threatened with extinction. The poorly-known Clown Wedgefish Rhynchobatus cooki has historically been recorded only from fish markets in Singapore and Jakarta, Indonesia. Its natural geographic range has until now gone undocumented. Social media posts revealed the first wild reco...
Article
Full-text available
• Public aquaria globally display numerous threatened fish species captured from wild populations. Potential impacts of harvests are rarely evaluated despite the need for improved management and conservation practices. • Sawfishes (Family Pristiidae) are one of the world's most at‐risk fish families. Most commonly displayed (30+ wild caught individ...
Article
With recent advances in sequencing technology, genomic data are changing how important conservation management decisions are made. Applications such as Close‐Kin Mark‐Recapture demand large amounts of data to estimate population size and structure, and their full potential can only be realised through ongoing improvements in genotyping strategies....
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Tortugas Skate (Dipturus bullisi) is a medium-sized (to 77 cm total length) demersal skate with a widespread but patchy distribution from the Gulf of Mexico to Pará, Brazil in the Western Central Atlantic. This is a poorly-known species occurring on upper continental shelves and slopes at depths of 185–550 m. No information is available on inte...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Rough Pygmy Skate (Cruriraja rugosa) is a small (to 51 cm total length) deepwater ray occurring from Florida (USA) to Brazil, including Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico in the Western Central and South Atlantic. This is a poorly-known species occurring on soft bottoms of continental and insular slopes at depths of 251–1,007 m. No information is ava...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Striped Rabbitfish (Hydrolagus matallanasi) is a small-sized deep-water chimaera (to at least 38 cm precaudal length) endemic to southern Brazil (states of Rio de Janeiro and Santa Catarina) in the Southwest Atlantic. It has been recorded from the upper continental slope at depths of 416–736 m. From the late 1990s, deep-water fisheries operated...
Article
• The process of understanding the rapid global decline of sawfishes (Pristidae) has revealed great concern for their relatives, the wedgefishes (Rhinidae) and giant guitarfishes (Glaucostegidae), not least because all three families are targeted for their high‐value and internationally traded ‘white’ fins. • The objective of this study was to asse...
Article
Full-text available
Zoos and public aquaria globally display numerous wild harvested, threatened species. To validate conservation credentials, displays are often associated with research projects, educational interpretation, or conservation-related activities. However, accompanying conservation benefits are rarely assessed. In this study, an approach to evaluate cons...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Caribbean Skate (Dipturus teevani) is a medium-sized (to 84 cm total length) deepwater ray that occurs in the Western Central and Southwest Atlantic from North Carolina, USA to Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, including the Bahamas, Gulf of Mexico, and Lesser Antilles. This is a poorly-known skate that inhabits upper continental slopes at depths of...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The San Blas Skate (Dipturus garricki) is a medium-sized (to 107 cm total length) demersal ray with a widespread but patchy distribution in the Western Central and Southwest Atlantic in the Gulf of Mexico and from Nicaragua to Piauí, Brazil, and inhabits upper continental slopes at depths of 275–475 m. No information is available on interactions wi...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The Hook Skate (Dactylobatus clarkii) is a medium-sized (to 75 cm total length) demersal skate with a widespread but patchy distribution from South Carolina (USA) to Rio Grande (Brazil) including the Lesser Antilles in the Western Atlantic. This is a poorly-known species that inhabits muddy bottoms on continental and insular slopes at depths of 300...
Article
Full-text available
The International Union for Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) Red List is the global standard for quantifying extinction risk but assessing population reduction (criterion A) of wide-ranging, long-lived marine taxa remains difficult and controversial. We show how Bayesian state-space models (BSSM), coupled with expert knowledge at IUCN Red List works...
Article
Conservation science is crucial to global conservation efforts, and often involves projects where foreign scientists visit a host country to conduct research. Science can significantly contribute to conservation efforts in host countries. However, poorly conceived and implemented projects can lead to poor conservation outcomes, cause negative impac...
Article
Full-text available
As the state of non-marine aquatic environments (freshwater and estuarine environments with salinities ≤ 30 ppt) continues to decline globally, there is increasing concern for elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) that use them at critical stages of their life history. Due to a range of impediments including unresolved taxonomy, lack of fisheries data, a...
Article
White et al. (2019) described a new species of whaler shark represented by only three specimens from South-east Asia, all collected prior to 1934. They proposed the nomen Carcharhinus obsolerus with the justification of: “The specific name is Latin for ‘extinct’ (obsolerus) in allusion to the fact that the species has not been recorded in many deca...
Article
• The national extinction risk of 103 New Zealand chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and chimaeras), ~10% of the global chondrichthyan fauna, was evaluated for the first time using the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List of Threatened Species Categories and Criteria. Across 32 families, 103 species were assessed. • New Zealand holds...
Preprint
Full-text available
The process of understanding the rapid global decline of sawfishes (Pristidae) has revealed great concern for their relatives, the wedgefishes (Rhinidae) and giant guitarfishes (Glaucostegidae), not least because all three families are targeted for their high-value and internationally-traded ‘white’ fins. The objective of this study was to assess t...
Research Proposal
The Alligator Rivers yellow chat is a small, bright yellow insectivorous subspecies of bird living on the floodplains of several major rivers in the ‘Top End’ of the Northern Territory including within and nearby Kakadu National Park. Despite its listing as Endangered, little research has been conducted on the bird and its habitat requirements and...
Research Proposal
The Alligator Rivers yellow chat is endangered. It lives on floodplains in and near Kakadu National Park. We don’t know much about why it is so rare or the best ways to look after it. The floodplains where the bird lives are also important to Traditional Owners. This project is about learning more about the bird and the best ways to look after it a...
Article
Full-text available
Carcharhinus obsolerus is described based on three specimens from Borneo, Thailand and Vietnam in the Western Central Pacific. It belongs to the porosus subgroup which is characterised by having the second dorsal-fin insertion opposite the anal-fin midbase. It most closely resembles C. borneensis but differs in tooth morphology and counts and a num...
Data
Vertebral and tooth count summaries for the genus Carcharhinus. Ranges for number of precaudal and total centra, and upper and lower teeth (with number of specimens included in range in parantheses) for members of the genus Carcharhinus. Species groupings follow a combination of information provided in [19] and molecular results in [30]; note these...
Data
Comparison of the tooth and jaw morphology. Key tooth and jaw characters useful for distinguishing between Carcharhinus obsolerus, Carcharhinus cerdale/porosus, Carcharhinus borneensis and Carcharhinus macloti. (DOCX)
Technical Report
The Far Eastern Curlew (FEC) is the largest migratory shorebird in the world. It is listed as Critically Endangered under the Environment Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 in Australia with numbers rapidly declining. Recent research has highlighted the importance of high quality non-breeding habitat to migratory shorebirds, but it is di...
Article
Tropical river and estuarine food webs sustain diverse biodiversity values and are important sources of nutrients and energy for connected aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. High-order predators, such as euryhaline elasmobranchs, play critical roles in these food webs, but a lack of detailed information on food web structure limits our ability to...
Article
Full-text available
The extinction risk of sharks, rays and chimaeras is higher than that for most other vertebrates due to low intrinsic population growth rates of many species and the fishing intensity they face. The Arabian Sea and adjacent waters border some of the most important chondrichthyan fishing and trading nations globally, yet there has been no previous a...
Technical Report
The Far Eastern Curlew (FEC) is the largest migratory shorebird in the world. It is listed as Critically Endangered in Australia with numbers rapidly declining. Recent research has highlighted the importance of high quality non-breeding habitat to migratory shorebirds, but it is difficult to provide strategic guidance to developers and decision-mak...
Article
Full-text available
The complete mitogenome of the Critically Endangered Largetooth Sawfish Pristis pristis (Rhinopristiformes, Pristidae) is presented in this study. The genome is 16,912 bp in length with a nucleotide base composition of 32.0% A, 26.5% C, 13.2% G, and 28.3% T, containing 37 genes typical of vertebrates. Two start (GTG and ATG) and two stop (TAG and T...
Article
Full-text available
The Critically Endangered (International Union for Conservation of Nature) largetooth sawfish, Pristispristis , was historically distributed in the tropical Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Today, ‘viable’ populations are largely limited to northern Australia. Populations that have suffered from drastic declines in abundance, such as those expe...
Article
The first record of the Ganges shark Glyphis gangeticus from anywhere in its range in over a decade is reported from the Arabian Sea. One female specimen was recorded at Sassoon Docks in Mumbai, India in February 2016, measuring 266 cm total length. In light of the Critically Endangered status of this species and its rarity, urgent management actio...
Article
The first record of the Ganges shark Glyphis gangeticus from anywhere in its range in over a decade is reported from the Arabian Sea. One female specimen was recorded at Sassoon Docks in Mumbai, India in February 2016, measuring 266 cm total length. In light of the Critically Endangered status of this species and its rarity, urgent management actio...
Technical Report
The objective of this trip to Broome, Western Australia was to join the Australasian Wader Studies Group (AWSG) Annual Wader and Tern Expedition (the expedition) to catch and tag five far eastern curlew to tag with GPS devices. The tagging will allow us to compare local Broome movements with movements of curlew in Darwin Harbour. Two Larrakia Range...
Article
Full-text available
Zoos and public aquaria exhibit numerous threatened species globally, and in the modern context of these institutions as conservation hubs, it is crucial that displays are ecologically sustainable. Elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) are of particular conservation concern and a higher proportion of threatened species are exhibited than any other assess...
Technical Report
The far eastern curlew is the largest migratory shorebird in the world. It is listed as Critically Endangered in Australia with numbers rapidly declining. Recent research has highlighted the importance of high quality non-breeding habitat to migratory shorebirds, but it is difficult to provide strategic guidance to developers and decision-makers be...
Technical Report
The Far Eastern Curlew is the largest migratory shorebird in the world. It is listed as Critically Endangered in Australia with numbers rapidly declining. Recent research has highlighted the importance of high quality non-breeding habitat to migratory shorebirds, but it is difficult to provide strategic guidance to developers and decision-makers be...
Book
Full-text available
This report provides an overview of the con- servation status of chondrichthyans (sharks, rays, and chimaeras) in the Arabian Seas Region (ASR) and describes the results of a regional Red List workshop held in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, in February 2017. It identies those species that are threatened with extinction at the regional level, so t...
Article
Full-text available
The Adelaide River in Australia's Northern Territory is a popular recreational fishing area, as well as habitat for threatened and protected river sharks (Glyphis species). Both the Critically Endangered Speartooth Shark (Glyphis glyphis) and Endangered Northern River Shark (Glyphis garricki) are identified here in illegal catches from recreational...
Article
Descriptions of the egg cases of Dentiraja polyommata (n = 16) and Asymbolus pallidus (n = 44) are provided from egg cases collected from a commercial trawl fishery off Swain Reefs, central Queensland, Australia. Egg cases of D. polyommata are rectangular, convex and golden-tan in colour and those of A. pallidus elongate, vase-shaped and golden. To...
Article
The Little Egret Egretta garzetta is widespread across Eurasia, Africa and Australasia. Global subspecific taxonomy has been problematic and remains somewhat unresolved. Marchant and Higgins recognised two subspecies: the nominate E. g. garzetta (widespread in Eurasia east to Japan, and Africa) and E. g. nigripes (range encompassing parts of Indone...
Article
The status of sawfishes (family Pristidae), and indeed most sharks and rays, in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is largely unknown due to the paucity of detailed catch and observational records available, both historic and contemporary. This paper provides the first comprehensive review of the published and unpublished literature on sawfish records in PNG....
Article
Full-text available
Tropical elasmobranchs could play significant roles in connecting coastal and river ecosystems, yet few studies have explored the trophic ecology of elasmobranch species that may link these biomes. We investigated the trophic niches of 7 such species in northern Australia during the tropical monsoonal wet and dry seasons, using stable carbon (δ13C)...