Peter Krause

Peter Krause
Boston College, USA | BC · Political Science Department

Doctor of Philosophy, MIT

About

34
Publications
4,931
Reads
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251
Citations
Citations since 2016
26 Research Items
207 Citations
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Introduction
I am an Associate Professor of Political Science at Boston College, a Research Affiliate with the MIT Security Studies Program, and a Fellow at the Crown Center for Middle East Studies. I recently published books on navigating field research, coercion in international politics, and the strategy and success of nationalist rebels in civil war. My research and teaching focus on Middle East politics, political violence, nationalism, rebels and revolution, and peace-building. www.peterjpkrause.com
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - present
Boston College, USA
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
July 2014 - July 2015
Harvard University
Position
  • Research Associate
September 2012 - June 2018
Boston College, USA
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (34)
Presentation
Full-text available
We talk to political scientists about what field research looks like on the ground. In each episode, we bring on expert guests to discuss different ethical and logistical aspects of the field research process, based on the book we co-edited with the same title: Stories From the Field: A Guide to Navigating Fieldwork in Political Science (Columbia U...
Preprint
Full-text available
Drawing on original interviews with ex-insurgents and eyewitnesses of the Second Chechen War (1999-2009), this article develops a theory of “kin killing,” defined as the use of lethal violence against the relatives of insurgents as a deliberate counterinsurgency tactic. Family-based targeting works by coercing insurgents to surrender or defect, det...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although only 23 people on average have been killed per year by terrorist attacks in the United States since 2001, American citizens and politicians consistently rank terrorism as a top security threat, leading to costly wars abroad and the repression of civil liberties at home. To what extent can education about terrorism alter perceptions of the...
Article
Full-text available
Why and how do conflict and violence spread across international borders? This article introduces a new theoretical framework for blowback operations, where a civil war combatant launches terrorist attacks in the home country of a foreign actor to compel this actor to end a military intervention. Using this framework, we explain how military interv...
Article
The majority of states in the world today were created via secession, but a majority of secessionist movements have failed to gain independence. Counter‐secession is not only more successful than secession; it is also more common. There are over 300 nations today that lack sovereign states, as well as untold thousands more groups whose identities n...
Article
Drawing on original interviews with ex-insurgents and eyewitnesses of the Second Chechen War (1999–2009), this article develops a theory of “kin killing,” defined as the use of lethal violence against insurgents’ relatives as a deliberate counterinsurgency tactic. Family-based targeting works by coercing insurgents to surrender or defect, deterring...
Article
Full-text available
Although only 23 people on average have been killed per year by terrorist attacks in the United States since 2001, American citizens and politicians consistently rank terrorism as a top security threat, leading to costly wars abroad and the repression of civil liberties at home. To what extent can education about terrorism alter perceptions of the...
Article
Full-text available
This reflection article presents insights on conducting fieldwork during and after COVID-19 from a diverse collection of political scientists—from department heads to graduate students based at public and private universities in the United States and abroad. Many of them contributed to a newly published volume, Stories from the Field: A Guide to Na...
Book
Full-text available
What do you do if you get stuck in an elevator in Mogadishu? How worried should you be about being followed after an interview with a ring of human traffickers in Lebanon? What happens to your research if you get placed on a government watchlist? And what if you find yourself feeling like you just aren't cut out for fieldwork? Stories from the Fiel...
Article
Full-text available
Given that minority ethno-political organizations are generally weaker than states yet seek to change their policies or remove the ruling regime from power, why would negotiation occur? States prefer to ignore or repress such organizations, which generally have little to offer in return amidst negotiations that can legitimize them while delegitimiz...
Chapter
Full-text available
The U.S. has a number of core interests in the Middle East, including preventing the rise of a regional hegemon, nuclear proliferation, and significant terrorist attacks on the homeland, as well as ensuring access to oil and the security of regional allies. These interests provide a backdrop for one of the most prominent regional threats of recent...
Chapter
Full-text available
When does terrorism work? The debate over terrorism’s effectiveness has narrowly focused on changes in state policy, but that is rarely the attacker’s main objective or the tactic’s most significant impact. This article presents a robust, multi-level framework for analyzing the effectiveness of terrorism that includes all three types of effectivene...
Article
International territorial expansion faces three significant constraints: norms of “border fixity” that aim to preserve the status quo, norms of self-determination that seek to reverse foreign conquest, and the high costs of compelling territorial change. State-led attempts to expand their territory run directly into each of these constraints, which...
Book
Full-text available
From the rising significance of non-state actors to the increasing influence of regional powers, the nature and conduct of international politics has arguably changed dramatically since the height of the Cold War. Yet much of the literature on deterrence and compellence continues to draw (whether implicitly or explicitly) upon assumptions and prece...
Chapter
This chapter conducts a comparative analysis across all the movements, groups, and campaigns; assesses and demonstrate synergies with competing arguments; scrutinizes the incorrect predictions of the Movement Structure Theory; identifies remaining questions for future research; and presents key policy implications for those whose goal is either to...
Chapter
This chapter on the Palestinian national movement examines the impact of hierarchy on group behavior. It uses a variety of tight within-case comparisons, in which the shifting of variables at different times allows for powerful assessments of why groups such as Fatah, the PFLP, and the Jordanian Communist Party used or restrained violence at differ...
Chapter
This chapter analyzes the history of the Algerian national movement. It demonstrates the virtues of hegemony and the relative insignificance of unity and total movement strength. Like the Palestinian national movement, the Algerian national movement was strategically successful during hegemony (1958–1962) but largely unsuccessful during periods of...
Book
Full-text available
Many of the world's states—from Algeria to Ireland to the United States—are the result of robust national movements that achieved independence. Many other national movements have failed in their attempts to achieve statehood, including the Basques, the Kurds, and the Palestinians. In Rebel Power, Peter Krause offers a powerful new theory to explain...
Article
Full-text available
Hatred of terrorists is an obstacle to the implementation of effective counterterrorism policies—it invites indiscriminate retaliation, whereas many of the greatest successes in counterterrorism have come from understanding terrorists’ personal and political motivations. Drawing from psychological research, traditional prejudice reduction strategie...
Article
Full-text available
In the early morning of July 31, 2015, masked attackers threw firebombs into two Palestinian homes in the West Bank village of Duma, south of Nablus, killing three Palestinian civilians. Contrary to claims by Israeli and Palestinian politicians, this attack was neither an isolated anomaly nor just another incident of settler violence. Instead, it w...
Article
Full-text available
¿Cuándo es eficaz el terrorismo? El debate sobre la eficacia del terrorismo se ha centrado casi exclusivamente en los cambios que este fenómeno produce en la política estatal; no obstante, ello rara vez es el principal objetivo o el impacto más significativo de esta táctica. Este artículo presenta un marco analítico multinivel para examinar la efi...
Article
Full-text available
The most striking aspect of the current scholarly debate over the political effectiveness of non-state violence is that, upon careful examination, there is not much of a debate to be found. Despite seemingly irreconcilable positions claiming that terrorism and insurgency “work” or “do not work,” varying case selection and thresholds for success lie...
Article
Full-text available
When and why do national movements succeed? What explains variation in the use and effectiveness of political violence employed by nationalist groups? Groups pursue common strategic goals against external enemies, such as the founding of a new state, while engaging in zero-sum competition for organizational dominance with internal rivals in their n...
Article
Full-text available
In recent months, news of Palestinian internal politics has been dominated by the Fatah-Hamas unity deal and the possibilities for its success or failure. In this Brief, I assesses both the unity deal and also a number of other options available to the Palestinian movement. I argue that given that no one group is likely to dominate the movement in...
Article
Full-text available
The United States cannot defeat al-Qaeda by strength of arms alone. It must also change the terms of debate in the Arab/Muslim world, especially in its radical wing. How can this best be accomplished? What strategy should the United States adopt for what is often called the “war of ideas” against radical Islam?
Article
Full-text available
The inability of the United States to capture or kill Osama bin Laden and many of his top deputies at Tora Bora is widely recognized as one of the most significant missed opportunities of America's struggle with al Qaeda. However, the debate over U.S. actions at Tora Bora during Operation Enduring Freedom lacks in-depth analysis, especially concern...
Article
Full-text available
Troop levels in stability operations have been one of the most hotly contested issues in American foreign policy. The Bush administration has faced significant criticism for ignoring the conventional wisdom regarding the number of soldiers required to secure Iraq, and subsequent attempts to change course in this area were seen by some as too little...

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