Peter James Kelly

Peter James Kelly
Deakin University

PhD

About

129
Publications
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2,091
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (129)
Research
Full-text available
My most cited work is the co-edited collection 'A Critical Youth Studies for the 21st Century'. Peter and I are thrilled that this is now available in paperback from Brill. Thirty-five chapters and five essays from leading global youth studies scholars, as detailed on the flyer.
Book
This book explores the complex ways in which belonging, identity and time are entangled in shaping young people engagement with the middle years of school. The authors argue that these ‘entanglements’ need to be understood in ways that move beyond a focus on why individual young people engage with the middle years. Instead, there should be a focus...
Chapter
The chapter engages with the extensive research literature on young people and belonging—in schools, in communities, as members of an ethnic or religious group, as part of a collective somewhere, doing something. Brown, Kelly and Phillips draw on research undertaken in Melbourne, to discuss the ways in which school culture, school networks and idea...
Chapter
In this chapter Brown, Kelly and Phillips argue that identity, a sense of self, is important in shaping young people’s engagement in the middle years of schooling. Drawing on posthuman and feminist theories they suggest that identity is relational, embodied and situated. Referencing research conducted in Melbourne they illustrate how Place, Familie...
Article
This paper contributes to debates that shaped a special issue of Discourse in 2017 by taking the debate about responsibilisation in education into the realm of Foundations Skills in Australia. The difficulties that many Australian adults experience with low levels of language, literacy and numeracy skills (Foundation Skills), have been widely ident...
Article
The early twentieth-century Futurist and Fascist sense of ‘speed’ as an aesthetic ideal and object of desire continues to be a pervasive and powerful influence in contemporary culture. The paper explores aspects of cultural imaginaries and discourses of the body, their relationships to the motor vehicle, and how these imaginaries play out in the he...
Article
The Global Financial Crisis (GFC) of 2007–2008 added significant stress and anxieties to the already precarious lives of many young people. Despite this, there is emerging evidence that young people are able to demonstrate remarkable resilience in the midst of economic uncertainties that render the trajectories of their futures uncertain. The press...
Article
In the ‘Rust Belt’ city of Geelong in Victoria, Australia, discourses of young people’s enterprise and innovation provide a counter-narrative to the prevailing material and symbolic consequences of industrial decline, job losses, and the growing insecurity of employment and income. GT Magazine is a weekly, large circulation magazine in Geelong with...
Chapter
This chapter teases out the ambivalence about the concept of ‘belonging’ and the work that this concept is made to do in education studies and in youth studies more broadly. It draws on the work of various authors and recent debates about a ‘political economy’ of youth. It argues that concerns about ‘belonging’ ought to be part of a broader politic...
Chapter
This chapter takes a generative stance to the challenge of ‘wicked problems’ in the context of childhood and youth studies. As articulated in Rittel and Webber’s classic article from 1973, wicked problems are those problems which resist ready definition, let alone solution. In the globalized context, childhood and youth studies are replete with suc...
Article
The paper seeks to makes a contribution to a recent debate in the Journal about what a political economy of youth might look like. The paper will take up aspects of Sukarieh and Tannock’s [2016. ‘On the political economy of youth: a comment.’ Journal of Youth Studies 19 (9): 1281–1289] response to the initial contributions by Côté [2014. ‘Towards a...
Chapter
In the days, months and years after many of the major institutions of globalised and financialised capitalism near froze, then went into meltdown in the later part of 2007 and the early part of 2008, and began to wreak havoc in spaces that, at first glance, had little direct relation to the worlds of US-based sub-prime mortgages, derivatives, Colla...
Chapter
As we finalise the introduction to what we think is an important, and timely, examination of the relationships between a globalising neo-Liberal capitalism, a post-2008–2009 Global Financial Crisis (GFC) environment of recession and austerity, and the moral economies of young people’s health and well-being, it appears that neo-Liberal, globalised c...
Book
Full-text available
During the so called Year of the Protester (Time 2011) we witnessed many young people around the world - the Spanish Indignados, the global Occupy movement, the young people of the various and different revolutions in the Arab Spring, and those participating in, and caught up by, the riots in many cities in the UK during August 2011 - voice their a...
Article
Full-text available
Recent commentary has extolled the virtues of a so-called Third Industrial Revolution (TIR). The First Industrial Revolution emerged in England at the end of the 18th century and was powered by steam; the Second Industrial Revolution emerged in the US at the start of the 20th century and was powered by electricity (the First and Second revolutions...
Book
Health promotion with young people has largely been framed by theories of behaviour change to target ‘unsafe’, ‘unhealthy’ and/or ‘risky’ behaviours. These theories and models seek to encourage the development in young people of reasoned, rational and risk-aware personal strategies. This book presents an innovative and critical perspective on you...
Chapter
Over the last decade, school food has emerged as one of the number of ways in which concerns over children and young people’s health might be addressed. In 2005 Jamie Oliver, TV chef, emerged as a significant voice, championing the capacity of school food to avert a range of potentially detrimental health conditions. This chapter attempts to identi...
Book
This collection examines the relationships between a globalising neoliberal capitalism, a post-GFC environment of recession and austerity, and the moral economies of young people’s health and well-being. Contributors explore how in the second decade of the 21st century, many young people in the OECD/EU economies and in the developing economies of A...
Chapter
This chapter takes a generative stance to the challenge of ‘wicked problems’ in the context of childhood and youth studies. As articulated in Rittel and Webber’s classic article from 1973, wicked problems are those problems which resist ready definition, let alone solution. In the globalized context, childhood and youth studies are replete with suc...
Article
In this paper I argue that in the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis of 2008–2009 young people, certain populations of young people in particular, are being made to bear a heavy burden, carry significant responsibilities for re-imagining their lives as a enterprise – an enterprise in which an investment in education and training and work incr...
Article
In the years following 9/11, we spoke to residents of an Australian city who had witnessed the attacks on television in a research process that we came to describe as holographic. This metaphor emerged as we struggled to represent data generated in these interviews. This struggle over meaning provoked us to ask fundamental questions about the colle...
Article
In this paper we re-visit the work of celebrity chef Jamie Oliver and the social enterprise Fifteen Foundation and their development of a programme designed to train unemployed young people in the hospitality industry. We argue, drawing on the Foucauldian literature on governmentality and technologies of the self, that social enterprise-based trans...
Chapter
Since the 1990s there has been a surge of televisual dramatisations of real-life cooking shows in industrialised countries (Versteegan 2010: 447). Through reality television cooking shows such as, MasterChef, Jamie 's Kitchen, Hell's Kitchen, viewers have encountered celebrity chefs, 'foodies', hospitality trainees, contestants, cooking competition...
Chapter
Over the last decade, school food has emerged as one of the number of ways in which concerns over children and young people’s health might be addressed. In 2005 Jamie Oliver, TV chef, emerged as a significant voice, championing the capacity of school food to avert a range of potentially detrimental health conditions. This chapter attempts to identi...
Book
Full-text available
In A Critical Youth Studies for the 21st Century Peter Kelly and Annelies Kamp present an edited collection that explores the challenges and opportunities faced by young people in an often dangerous 21st century. In an increasingly globalised world these challenges and opportunities include those associated with widening inequalities, precarious la...
Article
This book takes Jamie Oliver's campaign for better school meals as a starting point for thinking about morally charged concerns relating to young people's nutrition, health and well-being, parenting, and public health 'crises' such as obesity. The authors show how these debates are always about the moral project of the self.
Article
Full-text available
Adults are the ones who do the social science that takes young people as its object. In this paper, we draw on empirical research, social theory, our background in Youth Studies and, for one of us, experiential knowledge as a ‘former’ teenage parent to trouble the practice of social science, in general, and Youth Studies, in particular. Using teena...
Article
Full-text available
Chapter
Like much of Foucault’s (1995) work, Discipline and Punish has frequently been debated, and subjected to multiple interpretations in many of the social sciences where it has been inserted into a variety of disciplined spaces. Indeed, a less than generous reading of this debate might suggest that many of the key elements of Discipline and Punish hav...
Chapter
At an early, dramatic and pivotal point in the School Dinners series Jamie Oliver demonstrated the potential influence that these sorts of series can have on public discourse – particularly when joining up matters of (dis)taste, young people’s health and well-being, and apparent indifference by schools, local authorities and national governments. O...
Chapter
In this, admittedly limited, cartography of key dimensions of the moral geographies of young people and food we may have begun, for some, a little obliquely. It may not have been readily apparent what Samvara and his/her interlocutors on the subject of the choices to be made in relation to ‘ready meals’, ‘value burgers’, pay TV subscriptions, mobil...
Chapter
It is almost axiomatic to suggest that a concern with space, its organisation, effects and usage has traditionally been the dominant concern of geographic inquiry. But this interest in space, as we have indicated in our engagement with the concept of moral geographies, has also been the focus of both empirical and theoretical work in other social s...
Chapter
Jamie Oliver is undoubtedly one of the most influential and well-known figures in relation to concerns about eating habits, food production, processing and preparation, health and well-being and the food that we (who live in the UK, the US, Australia/New Zealand) feed our children in school and elsewhere. In 2005 his reality TV show Jamie’s School...
Chapter
Episode Two of Jamie’s School Dinners opens with a recap of what it is that Jamie Oliver is trying to achieve in his campaign to improve the food on offer to young people in many school dining rooms in the UK, and the difficulties that he is apparently facing.
Chapter
The (melo)drama that made Jamie’s School Dinners such compelling viewing for millions of viewers in the UK and around the world was established early on in the first episode of the series – as it must be if people are to be engaged and continue to tune in and to connect to the characters, the figures, that we encounter, that we care about, that mak...
Chapter
The horsemeat substitution scandal is neither the impetus for, nor the object of, the discussions and analyses that we want to develop in this book. However, this scandal makes clear, if we examine it in a particular way, key dimensions of what we want to identify as the moral geographies of young people and food. And it is these moral geographies...
Article
Full-text available
British Journal of Sociology of Education Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: of Sociology of Education (2013): 'Don't be a smart arse': social enterprise-based transitional labour-market programmes as neo-liberal technologies of the self, British Journal of Sociology of Education, makes every effor...
Article
Full-text available
In this article we inquire into the forms of intellectual work that are possible when non-Muslim, non-Arab, western academics (female PhD candidate, male PhD supervisor) seek to work together to analyse the war-blogs of a small number of Iraqi women. We confront the central challenge of how to understand and account for such things as freedom, choi...
Article
This article suggests that ideas about adolescent brains and their development increasingly function as powerful truths in making sense of young people. In this context, the knowledge practices of the neurosciences and evolutionary and developmental psychology are deemed capable of producing what we have come to understand as the evidence on which...
Article
In 2007 the elite Australian Rules footballer Ben Cousins was suspended by the Australian Football League for 12 months for ‘bringing the game into disrepute’. Cousins was the first, and at the time of writing, the only player to be suspended by the AFL for actions and behaviors that were claimed to be damaging to the reputation of the game and the...
Article
Peter Kelly is interested in the ways in which young people are made knowable, and governable, in relation to a range of problems that emerge in the 21st century. He illustrates where some of these trends are heading in an examination of how discourses of adolescent brain development make a powerful appearance in discussions about young people's se...
Article
Full-text available
Problematic alcohol consumption is a major public health, health education and health promotion issue in Australia and internationally. In an effort to better understand young people's drinking patterns and motivations we investigated the cultural drivers of drinking in 14–24 year-old Australians. We interviewed 60 young people in the state of Vict...
Article
Full-text available
The paper reports on key findings of a research project that examined the roles that communitybased sporting clubs in the Australian state of Victoria play in shaping young people’s understandings and uses of alcohol. Our research imagined clubs as community hubs that are located in complex networks that impact on the ways that clubs understand the...
Article
Full-text available
The ways that we have invented for knowing young people are governmentalised. This governmentalisation produces powerful incentives to conform to the rule-bound and institutionalised knowledge practices that institutions, government departments, corporations, and NGOs understand as being capable of telling truths about young people and about risk....
Article
In this article we discuss the ways in which the professional identity of Australian Football League (AFL) footballers — in a physical, high body contact sport — is shaped by concerns to develop different aspects of the body, mind and soul of the young men who want to become AFL footballers. Drawing on Michel Foucault’s later work on the care of th...
Article
Drawing on interviews about the drinking trajectories of sixty young Victorian drinkers (aged 20-24), this paper outlines patterns of change over time and explores two drinking biographies in depth. For most research participants, drinking alcohol was an enjoyable and integral part of their social lives, but its role changed as they made other tran...
Article
Full-text available
In the aftermath of the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, Iraqi civilians have witnessed their country descend into profound and often deadly chaos. HNK and Aunt Najma are two young voices from post-Saddam, post-invasion Iraq who write www-based diaries (blogs) on life in post-invasion Iraq. Through their voices, and via the voices of many other Ira...
Book
In the UK in 2002 the celebrity chef Jamie Oliver set out to transform a group of unemployed young Londoners into enterprising, passionate workers. Their struggles, and those that train and manage them, to develop a passionate orientation to work highlights many of the challenges we all face in the globalized labour markets of the 21st century.
Article
Full-text available
A passion for food that is understood in certain ways – slow, organic, not industrialised – plays a central role in the drama of the successful and popular Jamie's Kitchen (2002) and Jamie's Kitchen Australia (2006). Large parts of the drama in these shows revolve around an apparent lack of passion that is displayed by the marginalised, unemployed...
Chapter
We confess to having differing, and changing, attachments to Jamie Oliver the celebrity chef — sufficient to provoke us to watch or be aware of his presence on the programming schedules of various TV stations in the city where we live. However, as the LifeofBob blog indicates, this is an attachment that is not shared by everyone — celebrity attachm...
Chapter
In this chapter we will introduce detail about the Fifteen Foundation’s training programme — the development of which is reflective of some of the drama we witness in the original Jamie’s Kitchen TV series. This discussion will centre on the ways in which the Foundation identifies, understands and represents the individuals that it sees as the targ...
Chapter
Food — its meanings, its production, its preparation, its transformation, its presentation and, finally, its consumption — is central to the stories, the drama and the appeal of Jamie’s Kitchen. Food, understood in the way it is in Jamie’s Kitchen, promises to provide the means to provoke passion in the young people targeted by the Fifteen Foundati...
Chapter
Earlier in this book one of us admitted to a passion for food: for reading about, for watching TV shows on, and for working with, different ingredients and different ways of preparing and presenting food. Being passionate about food is something that we have no trouble understanding or identifying with. Both of us, in different contexts, would also...
Chapter
As we have illustrated throughout this book, much of Jamie Oliver’s appeal as a celebrity chef and social entrepreneur can be attributed to his laddishness — contrived, manufactured, authentic or otherwise. This laddishness is, by definition, gendered. He’s a lad! His apparent (to some) boyish charms, his appeal, his brand is gendered. The trainees...
Chapter
Zygmunt Bauman, the influential sociologist of liquid modernity, argues that at the start of the twenty-first century large numbers of people around the globe — hundreds of millions, in fact — are surplus to requirements, are, indeed, redundant. In Wasted Lives: Modernity and its Outcasts, Bauman (2004, pp. 5–6) argues that this redundancy is a con...
Chapter
In Chapter 2 of this book we spent a significant amount of space examining, analysing and problematizing the ways in which young people are made known within a variety of spaces (policy, academic, community); in relation to a variety of purposes and ends (education, training, work); by a variety of individuals, organizations, agencies (Jamie Oliver...
Chapter
In Chapter 2 we introduced a number of ideas/concepts from Ulrich Beck’s Brave New World of Work. A principal concern at that point was Beck’s contention that the labour markets of the overdeveloped West are being transformed in the movement from what he identifies as the work society to the risk society. In the work society the promise of salvatio...
Book
"In the UK in 2002, the celebrity chef Jamie Oliver set out to transform a group of unemployed young Londoners into enterprising, passionate workers. Their struggles, and those that train and manage them, to develop a passionate orientation to work, highlight many of the challenges we all face in the globalized labour markets of the 21st century"--...
Article
In an era when games at the elite level are sports entertainment businesses many of the elite performers in different industries have evolved into celebrities: they exist as images, icons and brands whose every thought, action, change of style or partner is commodified and consumed. This article reports on one aspect of a research project that was...
Article
Full-text available
In the commercialised and professionalised world of elite sport, issues associated with career pathways and post sporting career options have a particular resonance. In various football codes, an unexpected knock, twist, bend or break can profoundly impact a player's career. In this high risk and high consequence environment, a number of sports ent...
Book
"The book discusses the profound, often troubling, always complex struggles for the body, mind and soul of elite performers in contemporary sports entertainment environments. This struggle is shaped by two powerful processes. On the one hand we witness the translation and application of a range of rationalities and knowledges from fields such as ps...
Article
Drawing on Michel Foucault’s later genealogies of the Self the paper will illustrate particular dimensions of the increasingly powerful individualizing and normalizing processes shaping the lifeworlds of worker-citizens in a globalizing risk society. Processes that require those who wish to be positively identified as professional, entrepreneurial,...
Article
An apparent crisis of youth at‐risk is a key marker in contemporary debates about young people among a range of intellectuals, social commentators and experts in various domains and centres of expertise. Drawing on aspects of the reflexive modernization, governmentality and feminist literatures, this paper explores how risk discourses emerge as a m...
Article
This paper reports a case study of a workplace health programme in an international information technology company. Discourse analysis was used to identify how specific forms of knowledge create understandings of health and influence power relations between employee and organization. These forms of knowledge are shown to make employee health both v...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Archived project
This Final Evaluation Report sets out the findings of an evaluation of the Pitch Tank Initiative - a strategic initiative aimed at growing RMIT’s reputation and supporting growth of VE through investing in innovative VE projects. The evaluation report examines the outcomes of Pitch Tank projects up to their completion in mid-December 2018. It also examines the impact of the Pitch Tank Initiative on advancing RMIT’s standing in fulfilling its Sustainable Development Goals commitments as a global university, and in developing an applied research agenda with local and global reach.
Archived project
In July 2011, the Deakin research team began an Australian Research Council Linkage funded project in partnership with Mission Australia, focused on Mission Australia’s social enterprise restaurant, Charcoal Lane. The research project, titled ‘Capacity Building and Social Enterprise: Individual and Organisational Transformation in a Transitional Labour Market Program’, consisted of two related studies. The first, the Action Learning Project, gathered data, which was then fed back to key stakeholders at regular intervals intervening in the organisational practices of the enterprise with the aim of facilitating the program’s sustainability. The second part identified factors that influence young people’s experiences and outcomes in this program. This research aimed to provide significant insights into the ways in which social enterprises can support marginalised young people’s transitions into increasingly precarious labour markets.