Peter E. Keller

Peter E. Keller
Western Sydney University · MARCS Institute

PhD (Psychology)

About

217
Publications
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6,532
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Publications

Publications (217)
Article
Full-text available
Joint music performance requires flexible sensorimotor coordination between self and other. Cognitive and sensory parameters of joint action—such as shared knowledge or temporal (a)synchrony—influence this coordination by shifting the balance between self-other segregation and integration. To investigate the neural bases of these parameters and the...
Article
Full-text available
Human movements are spontaneously attracted to auditory rhythms, triggering an automatic activation of the motor system, a central phenomenon to music perception and production. Cortico-muscular coherence (CMC) in the theta, alpha, beta and gamma frequencies has been used as an index of the synchronisation between cortical motor regions and the mus...
Article
Humans have a natural tendency to move to music, which has been linked to the tight coupling between the auditory and motor system and the active role of the motor system in the perception of musical rhythms. High-groove music is particularly successful at inducing spontaneous movement, due to the engagement of (motor) prediction processes. However...
Preprint
Despite acknowledging that musicality evolved to serve multiple adaptive functions in human evolution, Savage et al. promote social bonding to an overarching super-function. Yet, no unifying neurobiological framework is offered. We propose that oxytocin constitutes a socio-allostatic agent whose modulation of sensing, learning, prediction, and beha...
Article
Full-text available
When people interact with each other, their brains synchronize. However, it remains unclear whether interbrain synchrony (IBS) is functionally relevant for social interaction or stems from exposure of individual brains to identical sensorimotor information. To disentangle these views, the current dual-EEG study investigated amplitude-based IBS in p...
Article
Full-text available
Complex sequential behaviors, such as speaking or playing music, entail flexible rule-based chaining of single acts. However, it remains unclear how the brain translates abstract structural rules into movements. We combined music production with multimodal neuroimaging to dissociate high-level structural and low-level motor planning. Pianists playe...
Article
Humans perceive and spontaneously move to one or several levels of periodic pulses (a meter, for short) when listening to musical rhythm, even when the sensory input does not provide prominent periodic cues to their temporal location. Here, we review a multi-levelled framework to understanding how external rhythmic inputs are mapped onto internally...
Article
Despite acknowledging that musicality evolved to serve multiple adaptive functions in human evolution, Savage et al. promote social bonding to an overarching super-function. Yet, no unifying neurobiological framework is offered. We propose that oxytocin constitutes a socio-allostatic agent whose modulation of sensing, learning, prediction, and beha...
Article
The ability to distinguish between an individual's own actions and those of another person is a requirement for successful joint action, particularly in domains such as group music making where precise interpersonal coordination ensures perceptual overlap in the effects of co-performers' actions. We tested the hypothesis that such coordination bene...
Article
Full-text available
We report an experiment to investigate possible vestibular effects on finger tapping to an auditory anapaest rhythm. In a sample of 10 subjects, index finger acceleration and tapping force were recorded along with extensor/flexor activity and the associated electroencephalographic activity measured at central and cerebellar surface electrodes. In a...
Article
Full-text available
People have a natural and intrinsic ability to coordinate body movements with rhythms surrounding them, known as sensorimotor synchronisation. This can be observed in daily environments, when dancing or singing along with music, or spontaneously walking, talking or applauding in synchrony with one another. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms...
Article
Full-text available
During joint action, the sense of agency enables interaction partners to implement corrective and adaptive behaviour in response to performance errors. When agency becomes ambiguous (e.g., when action similarity encourages perceptual self-other overlap), confusion as to who produced what may disrupt this process. The current experiment investigated...
Article
Interpersonal musical entrainment—temporal synchronization and coordination between individuals in musical contexts—is a ubiquitous phenomenon related to music’s social functions of promoting group bonding and cohesion. Mechanisms other than sensorimotor synchronization are rarely discussed, while little is known about cultural variability or about...
Article
Full-text available
Humans spontaneously synchronize their movements with external auditory rhythms such as a metronome or music. Although such synchronization preferentially occurs toward a simple 1:1 movement–sound frequency ratio, the parameters facilitating spontaneous synchronization to more complex frequency ratios remain largely unclear. The present study inves...
Preprint
Full-text available
Complex sequential behaviours, such as speaking or playing music, often entail the flexible, rule-based chaining of single acts. However, it remains unclear how the brain translates abstract structural rules into concrete series of movements. Here we demonstrate a multi-level contribution of anatomically distinct cognitive and motor networks to the...
Preprint
When listening to music, humans spontaneously perceive and synchronize movement to periodic pulses of meter. A growing body of evidence suggests that this widespread ability is related to neural processes that selectively enhance meter periodicities. However, to what extent these neural processes are affected by the attentional state of the listene...
Article
Full-text available
Because work songs are ubiquitous around the world, singing while working and performing a task with a coactor is presumably beneficial for both joint action and individual task performance. The present study investigated the impact of interpersonal rhythmic vocal interaction on interpersonal phase relations and on individual motor timing performan...
Article
Full-text available
Human movements often spontaneously fall into synchrony with auditory and visual environmental rhythms. Related behavioral studies have shown that motor responses are automatically and unintentionally coupled with external rhythmic stimuli. However, the neurophysiological processes underlying such motor entrainment remain largely unknown. Here we i...
Article
Interpersonal coordination is exemplified in ensemble musicians, who coordinate their actions deliberately in order to achieve temporal synchronisation in their performances. However, musicians also move parts of their bodies unintentionally or spontaneously, sometimes in ways that do not directly produce sound from their instruments. Musicians' mo...
Article
Full-text available
When listening to music, people often perceive and move along with a periodic meter. However, the dynamics of mapping between meter perception and the acoustic cues to meter periodicities in the sensory input remain largely unknown. To capture these dynamics, we recorded the EEG while non-musician and musician participants listened to nonrepeating...
Article
Human rhythmic movements spontaneously synchronize with auditory rhythms at various frequency ratios. The emergence of more complex relationships, for instance, frequency ratios of 1:2 and 1:3, is enhanced by adding a congruent accentuation pattern (binary for 1:2 and ternary for 1:3), resulting in a 1:1 movement–accentuation relationship. However,...
Article
Full-text available
Human movements spontaneously entrain to auditory rhythms, which can help to stabilise movements in time and space. The properties of auditory rhythms supporting the occurrence of this phenomenon, however, remain largely unclear. Here, we investigate in two experiments the effects of pitch and tempo on spontaneous movement entrainment and stabilisa...
Article
Full-text available
Research has demonstrated that the human cognitive system allocates attention most efficiently to a stimulus that occurs in synchrony with an established rhythmic background. However, our environment is dynamic and constantly changing. What happens when rhythms to which our cognitive system adapted disappear? We addressed this question using a visu...
Article
Full-text available
Motor simulation has been implicated in how musicians anticipate the rhythm of another musician’s action to achieve interpersonal synchronization. Here, we investigated whether similar mechanisms govern a related form of rhythmic action: dance. We examined (1) whether synchronization with visual dance stimuli was influenced by movement agency, (2)...
Article
Sensorimotor synchronization is a general skill that musicians have developed to the highest levels of performance, including synchronization in timing and articulation. This study investigated neurocognitive processes that enable such high levels of performance, specifically testing the relevance of 1) motor resonance and sharing high levels of mo...
Article
Full-text available
People commonly move along with auditory rhythms in the environment. Although the processes underlying such sensorimotor synchronisation have been extensively investigated in the previous research, the properties of auditory rhythms that facilitate the synchronisation remain largely unclear. This study explored the possible benefits of a continuity...
Article
Humans coordinate their movements with one another in a range of everyday activities and skill domains. Optimal joint performance requires the continuous anticipation of and adaptation to each other's movements, especially when actions are spontaneous rather than pre-planned. Here we employ dual-EEG and frequency-tagging techniques to investigate h...
Article
Full-text available
Coordinated behavior promotes collaboration among humans. To shed light upon this relationship, we investigated whether and how interpersonal coordination is promoted by empathic perspective taking (EPT). In a joint music-making task, pairs of participants rotated electronic music-boxes, producing two streams of musical sounds that were meant to be...
Article
Full-text available
Interpersonal coordination of movements often involves precise synchronization of action timing, particularly in expert domains such as ensemble music performance. According to the adaptation and anticipation model (ADAM) of sensorimo-tor synchronization, precise yet flexible interpersonal coordination is supported by reactive error correction mech...
Preprint
When listening to musical rhythm, people tend to spontaneously perceive and move along with a periodic pulse-like meter. Moreover, perception and entrainment to the meter show remarkable stability in the face of dynamically changing rhythmic structure of music, even when acoustic cues to meter frequencies are degraded in the rhythmic input. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
When people engage in rhythmic joint actions, from simple clapping games to elaborate joint music making, they tend to increase their tempo unconsciously. Despite the rich literature on rhythmic performance in humans, the mechanisms underlying joint rushing are still unknown. We propose that joint rushing arises from the concurrent activity of two...
Preprint
Full-text available
For precise interpersonal coordination, some degree of merging a sense of self with other is required. In group music making, one may want to be in “sync” with one's ensemble and, if playing a similar instrument, one can assume a degree of temporal and acoustic overlap. However, to what extent is self-other merging optimal? An incorrect balance of...
Article
Humans spontaneously synchronize their movements with external auditory rhythms such as a metronome or music. Although such synchronization preferentially occurs toward simple 1:1 movement-stimulus frequency ratio, the extent to which spontaneous synchronization can also occur toward more complex frequency ratios remains largely unclear. The presen...
Article
Full-text available
Rhythmic movements produced by humans become spontaneously entrained to auditory rhythms in the environment. Evidence suggests that synchronisation to external auditory rhythms can contribute to the stabilisation of movements in time and space, opening new perspectives for motor training and rehabilitation. Here we compared the effects of single (1...
Article
Full-text available
Audio-motor coordination is a fundamental requirement in the learning and execution of sequential actions such as music performance. Predictive motor control mechanisms determine the sequential content and timing of upcoming tones and thereby facilitate accurate performance. To study the role of auditory-motor predictions at early stages of acquiri...
Article
Music presents a complex case of movement timing, as one to several dozen musicians coordinate their actions at short time-scales. This process is often directed by a conductor who provides a visual beat and guides the ensemble through tempo changes. The current experiment tested the ways in which audio-motor coordination is influenced by visual cu...
Article
Interpersonal sensorimotor synchronisation requires individuals to anticipate and adapt to their partner's movement timing. Research has demonstrated that the intentionality of a co-actor affects joint action planning, however, less is known about whether co-actor intentionality affects sensorimotor synchronisation. Explicit and implicit knowledge...
Article
Full-text available
Music makes us move, and using bass instruments to build the rhythmic foundations of music is especially effective at inducing people to dance to periodic pulse-like beats. Here, we show that this culturally widespread practice may exploit a neurophysiological mechanism whereby low-frequency sounds shape the neural representations of rhythmic input...
Article
Perceptual coupling between people can lead to the spontaneous synchronisation of their rhythmic movements. In the current study, we hypothesised that the sight of a co-actor generates anchoring (local stabilisation around specific spatiotemporal points within movement cycles), and that such anchoring supports the occurrence and stability of sponta...
Article
Full-text available
The tendency for groove-based music to induce body movements has been linked to multiple acoustical factors. However, it is unclear how or whether tempo affects groove, although tempo significantly affects other aspects of music perception. To address this issue, the present study investigated effects of tempo, specific rhythmic organizations of pa...
Article
Full-text available
The combination of frequency-tagging with electroencephalography (EEG) has recently proved fruitful for understanding the perception of beat and meter in musical rhythm, a common behavior shared by humans of all cultures. EEG frequency-tagging allows the objective measurement of input–output transforms to investigate beat perception, its modulation...
Article
Full-text available
Human interaction involves the exchange of temporally coordinated, multimodal cues. Our work focused on interaction in the visual domain, using music performance as a case for analysis due to its temporally diverse and hierarchical structures. We made use of two improvising duo datasets—(i) performances of a jazz standard with a regular pulse and (...
Article
Full-text available
The spontaneous ability to entrain to meter periodicities is central to music perception and production across cultures. There is increasing evidence that this ability involves selective neural responses to meter-related frequencies. This phenomenon has been observed in the human auditory cortex, yet it could be the product of evolutionarily older...
Preprint
Note: This is a pre-print of an article published in the journal "Psychological Research". The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-018-0987-6.A full-text view-only version of the published paper can be freely accessed at: http://rdcu.be/FOZeAbstract:Motor simulation has been implicated in how musicians...
Chapter
In this chapter, the relationship between music and action is examined from two perspectives: one where individuals learn to play an instrument, and another where music induces movement in a listener. For both perspectives, we review experimental research, mostly consisting of neuroscientific studies, as well as select behavioral investigations. We...
Article
It is well established that musical training induces sensorimotor plasticity. However, there are remarkable differences in how musicians train for proficient stage performance. The present EEG study outlines for the first time clear-cut neurobiological differences between classical and jazz musicians at high and low levels of action planning, revea...
Article
Full-text available
The current study investigated whether visual coupling between two people producing dance-related movements (requiring whole-body auditory-motor coordination) results in interpersonal entrainment and modulates individual auditory-motor coordination dynamics. Paired participants performed two kinds of coordination tasks – either knee flexion or exte...
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Article
Full-text available
Human interaction through music is a vital part of social life across cultures. Influential accounts of the evolutionary origins of music favor cooperative functions related to social cohesion or competitive functions linked to sexual selection. However, work on non-human “chorusing” displays, as produced by congregations of male insects and frogs...
Article
Full-text available
Sensorimotor synchronization (SMS) is prevalent and readily studied in musical settings, as most people are able to perceive and synchronize with a beat (e.g. by finger tapping). We took an individual differences approach to understanding SMS to real music characterized by expressive timing (i.e. fluctuating beat regularity). Given the dynamic natu...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Spontaneous synchronization is defined as the entrainment of human movement to a rhythmic stimulus without any instruction to do so (Repp & Su, 2013). Studies have shown that listening to an auditory rhythm can modulate the tempo of our own periodic movements, such as tapping, or rocking in a rocking chair (Demos et al. 2012; Hattori et al., 2015)....
Article
Full-text available
Successful joint action requires negotiation, especially in the event of goal incongruence. This paper addresses goal incongruence in joint musical performance by manipulating the congruence of score instructions (congruent/incongruent) regarding tempo (speed) and dynamics (sound intensity) given to piano duos. The aim is to investigate how co-perf...
Article
Spontaneous modulations of corticospinal excitability during action observation have been interpreted as evidence for the activation of internal motor representations equivalent to the observed action. Alternatively or complementary to this perspective, growing evidence shows that motor activity during observation of rhythmic movements can be modul...
Article
Spontaneous modulations of corticospinal excitability during action observation have been interpreted as evidence for the activation of internal motor representations equivalent to the observed action. Alternatively or complementary to this perspective, growing evidence shows that motor activity during observation of rhythmic movements can be modul...
Article
Human rhythmic movements spontaneously entrain to external rhythmic stimuli. Such sensory-motor entrainment can attract movements to different tempi and enhance their efficiency, with potential clinical applications for motor rehabilitation. Here we investigate whether entrainment of self-paced rhythmic movements can be induced via transcranial alt...