Peter Guest

Peter Guest
Vianova Archaeology & Heritage Services

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
5,716
Reads
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102
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in many apsects of Roman society and culture, but my research tends to focus on the archaeology of Roman Britain and Roman numismatics. The Roman Empire also offers the opportunity to examine other imperial episodes in history, and I am drawn to the many fascinating (and sometimes disturbing) parallels with the world that we live in today too. I am a freelance archaeologist, numismatist and heritage consultant - see https://vianovaarchaeology.com/ for more info on what we do.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
Vianova Archaeology & Heritage Services
Position
  • Consultant
Description
  • Archaeologist and numismatist with over 30 years’ experience as a finds specialist, excavator, researcher, teacher, curator and project manager. Peter specialises in the Roman period and is particularly interested in Britannia and the northwestern provinces, the Roman army and frontiers, as well as Roman coinage and the economy. The excavations at Caerleon were highly successful research, training and engagement projects, that are bringing cutting-edge research to the widest audiences.
September 2000 - August 2019
Cardiff University
Position
  • Reader
September 1997 - November 1998
British Museum
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
September 1990 - May 1994
University College London - Institute of Archaeology
Field of study
  • Archaeology
September 1986 - July 1989
University College London - Institute of Archaeology
Field of study
  • Archaeology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Full-text available
Provisioning large concentrations of professional soldiers in Britain after the invasion in AD 43 was a major challenge for the Roman imperial administration. In a distant frontier province such as Britannia, it is generally believed that locally produced agricultural resources must have been vital in feeding and maintaining the occupying army, but...
Chapter
Full-text available
Although the deposition of caches of valuable objects was a longstanding practice in Britain, extending far back into prehistory, more hoards of gold and silver have been recovered from the end of the Roman period than any other in British archaeology. Some of these are among the most significant collections of precious metal objects from the entir...
Book
Full-text available
Six trenches were excavated in August and September 2021 to evaluate the condition of the archaeological remains of the late Roman ‘villa’ at Hinton St Mary in Dorset. This was the first time since 1965 that invasive archaeological fieldwork had been undertaken at the site, when the famous mosaic was lifted and taken to the British Museum. Grey lit...
Chapter
Full-text available
Report on the 93 excavated coins from the Romano-British farmstead at Houghton Regis in Bedfordshire. Includes stratigraphic discussion of coin loss as the settlement developed during the Roman period, and highlights the possible deliberate deposition of coins with legends and images associated with divinity, health and wellbeing in water-pits. Com...
Article
Full-text available
Lying at the heart of the city of Venta Silurum, the forum-basilica at Caerwent tells the public, municipal, story of the Civitas Silurum in south Wales. The re-excavation of this complex between 1987 and 1995 revealed a wealth of new information that has a great deal to tell us about the history of the city and the fortunes of its inhabitants. Con...
Article
Full-text available
Discovered during archaeological investigations in the southern suburbs of Bristol, the Hengrove hoard is an unusual cache of coins from the mid-fourth century. It contains 309 bronze and silvered bronze small change denominations, most of which were produced in a short seven to ten year period after 348. These include a significant number of coins...
Book
Full-text available
Eleven trenches were excavated in July 2019 within the ‘small town’ at Durobrivae (Water Newton), to evaluate the condition of the underlying archaeological remains and to provide information in advance of a possible larger-scale research project. This was the first time since the 1820s that archaeological fieldwork has been undertaken within the w...
Chapter
Full-text available
The six seasons of Anglo-Bulgarian excavations at Dichin produced at least 406 coins classified as site-finds, as well as two hoards of 12 and 5 coins . This assemblage is from one of the most extensively investigated late antique sites on the lower Danube, and the Dichin coins are a new and important source of information for the supply and use of...
Chapter
Full-text available
Why have so many hoards of late Roman gold, silver and bronze objects been recovered from the British Isles, and what do these finds tell us about the ‘End’ of Roman Britain? This article explores these important questions and, reassessing the numismatic, archaeological and historical evidence, suggests that this highly unusual episode occurred in...
Book
Full-text available
The excavations at Caerleon in the summer of 2011 were focused on the complex of monumental buildings outside the fortress of Isca. This impressive suburb extended over about 5 hectares, including some of the largest Roman buildings in Britain, and this report presents the results of the nine trenches opened across the full extent of the complex. T...
Chapter
Full-text available
A discussion of the siliquae from the Traprain Law Treasure in light of the major concentrations of the these late Roman coins from southern Britain. Includes ideas on why silver coins were clipped, and the significance of similar finds in southern Scandinavia. In: F. Hunter and K. Painter (eds), 'Late Roman silver and the end of Empire: the Trapra...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the results of extensive magnetometer and resistivity surveys undertaken at Caerleon between 2006 and 2008. The western side of Isca remains largely free of modern buildings and, consequently, little archaeological work has been undertaken in this part of the fortress. Therefore, almost nothing was known about the layout of th...
Article
Full-text available
Over 52,000 Roman coins have been recorded and published from Wales. Using this comprehensive numismatic sample, this article investigates how coins of different metals and denominations were used and lost in western Britain during the later Iron Age and early Roman periods. The analysis of coins from hoards, excavated sites and single finds produc...
Article
Full-text available
The Roman legionary fortress at Caerleon in south Wales, has been subject to archaeological investigation for more than 150 years, including the well-known amphitheatre excavations conducted by Mortimer and Tessa Wheeler in the 1920s. This retrospective link with the Institute of Archaeology has now been reinforced by a new project, organized joint...
Chapter
Full-text available
“When he [Attila] saw a painting of the Roman Emperors sitting upon golden thrones and Scythians lying dead before their feet, he sought a painter and ordered him to paint Attila upon a throne and the Roman Emperors heaving sacks upon their shoulders and pouring out gold before his feet.” This account of Attila’s reaction to seeing the decorative f...
Book
Full-text available
IARCW is a research project whose purpose is the study of the supply, circulation and use of ancient coins within modern Wales. The intention is to better understand the production of coins and the impact of coinage on the diverse population of this part of western Britain from the first century BC to the fifth century AD. The book is a corpus of m...
Book
Full-text available
Discovered in 1992, the Hoxne Treasure is perhaps the richest cache of gold and silver coins, jewellery and tableware from the entire Roman world. The core of this volume is the catalogue of the 15,000 late 4th- and early 5th-century gold and silver coins, together with an in-depth discussion of the production and supply of late Roman coinage. Hoxn...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The overarching aim is to address how the Roman army was supplied in three key frontier regions of Britannia - Hadrian's Wall, the Antonine Wall, and around the fortress of Caerleon in southeast Wales. The project’s objectives comprise: • Identifying the supply networks to forts and fortresses in the three study regions by establishing the origins of cattle, sheep/goats and pigs through multi-isotope analysis; • Reconstructing animal and landscape management - manuring, foddering regimes and diet - to explore patterns of economic intensification to meet the needs of the Roman army, by carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis, integrated with existing faunal demographic (age/sex) data; • Exploring chronological variation in supply patterns to establish whether approaches to provisioning changed when the frontiers and their forts had become established in the landscape. Find out more about the project at: https://vianovaarchaeology.com/feeding-the-roman-army-in-britain/
Project
Headquarters of the Second Augustan Legion, Isca is uniquely important for the study of the conquest, pacification and colonisation of the native British tribes by the Roman army. Find out more at: https://vianovaarchaeology.com/roman-caerleon/