Peter Deplazes

Peter Deplazes
University of Zurich | UZH · Institute of Parasitology

MD, EVPC

About

681
Publications
100,945
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24,735
Citations
Citations since 2017
129 Research Items
10422 Citations
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201720182019202020212022202305001,0001,5002,000

Publications

Publications (681)
Article
Full-text available
Both alveolar (AE) and cystic echinococcosis (CE) are lacking pathognomonic clinical signs; consequently imaging technologies and serology remain the main pillars for diagnosis. The present study included 100 confirmed treatment-naïve AE and 64 CE patients that were diagnosed in Switzerland or Kyrgyzstan. Overall, 10 native Echinococcus spp. antige...
Article
Full-text available
The diagnosis of human taeniosis can be achieved through coproscopy, ELISA or PCR. An important limitation of these methods is the high turnaround time for stool sample collection and preparation, indicating the need for a straightforward sampling strategy. Due to the high metabolic activity and reproductive potential of Taenia spp., we hypothesise...
Article
In einem Hochendemiegebiet der alveolären Echinokokkose (AE), einer Zoonose verursacht durch den Fuchsbandwurm Echinococcus multilocularis wurde in Südwestdeutschland ein Feldhase (Lepus europaeus) während der offiziellen Jagd erlegt. Bei der amtlichen Fleischuntersuchung zeigten sich makroskopisch für eine AE suspekte, subkapsulär im Leberparenchy...
Article
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The detection of Echinococcus multilocularis in infected canids and the environment is pivotal for a better understanding of the epidemiology of alveolar echinococcosis in endemic areas. Necropsy/sedimentation and counting technique remain the gold standard for the detection of canid infection. PCR-based detection methods have shown high sensitivit...
Article
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Viable eggs of the canine intestinal tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) infect various intermediate hosts causing cystic echinococcosis (CE). Furthermore, CE represents a serious zoonosis causing a significant global burden of disease. CE is highly endemic in South America, including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, and Peru. For...
Article
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In North America, the only endemic focus for Angiostrongylus vasorum (French heartworm) was historically thought to occur in the southeastern part of the island of Newfoundland. However, reports of A. vasorum infection in wild canids in West Virginia, USA, and Nova Scotia, Canada, suggest the introduction of the parasite to mainland North America....
Article
Background: Regulatory T (Treg) cells are involved in homeostasis of immune regulation and suppression of inflammation and T-cell polarisation. Current knowledge regarding the role of Treg cells in the initiation of allergic disease is limited for both people and dogs. Objectives: To explore the role of circulating Treg cells and their possible...
Article
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The endangered Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) is a keystone species playing an essential role in ecology as well as in the social and spiritual lives of the Himalayan people. The latest estimate of the Bengal tiger population in Bhutan accounts for 103 individuals. Infectious organisms, including zoonotic parasites causing high burden in hum...
Article
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Background Alveolar (AE) and cystic echinococcosis (CE) in humans are caused by the metacestode of the tapeworms Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s . l . ) . Immunohistochemistry with the monoclonal antibodies (mAb) Em2G11, specific for AE, and the mAb EmG3, specific for AE and CE, is an important pillar of the hi...
Article
Domestic cats are the most important definitive hosts for Toxoplasma gondii, the agent of an important global zoonosis. Serial sera from cats orally inoculated either with T. gondii tissue cysts (n=3) or sporulated oocysts (n=3) and from 65 client-owned cats, plus sera from 1,757 client-owned cats presented to veterinarians in Switzerland were anal...
Chapter
Vector-borne diseases are transmitted through arthropods and new associations between them and pathogens are continually being described. In the present study, authors briefly address their research areas, reporting multiple collaboration studies and major findings achieved by the CIISA’s Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases team and its partners ov...
Article
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Red deer (Cervus elaphus) carcasses showing grey-greenish discolouration have been increasingly observed in the canton of Grisons, Switzerland. We investigated whether Sarcocystis infections were associated with this pathology, and whether wild and domestic canids were involved in their transmission. Meat from affected red deer (n = 26), faeces and...
Article
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Susceptibility to Echinococcus multilocularis infection considerably varies among intermediate (mostly rodents) and dead-end host species (e.g., human, pig), in particular regarding intestinal oncosphere invasion and subsequent hepatic metacestode development. Wistar rats are highly resistant to infection and subsequent disease upon oral inoculatio...
Article
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Cystic and alveolar echinococcosis-CE and AE-are parasitic zoonoses caused by tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus and E. multilocularis. Their lifecycle is associated with particular environmental and climatic conditions, which have been identified as risk factors for CE and AE transmission. In this study, we assessed potential environmental and clim...
Article
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Different helminths and protozoa are transmitted to humans by oral uptake of environmentally resistant parasite stages after hand-to-mouth contact or by contaminated food and water. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a method for the simultaneous detection of parasite stages from fresh produce (lettuce) by a one-way isolation test ki...
Article
Spirocerca vulpis is a parasitic nematode of red foxes associated with gastric nodule formation. Since its description in 2018, this species has been reported in red foxes from Spain, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Italy, and Portugal. We present here the analysis of uncharacterized nematodes obtained from gastric nodules of a red fox from Switzerland in...
Article
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Alveolar and cystic echinococcosis (AE, CE) caused by E. multilocularis and E. granulosus s.l., respectively, are considered emerging zoonotic diseases in Kyrgyzstan with some of the world highest regional incidences. Little is known regarding the molecular variability of both species in Kyrgyzstan. In this study we provide molecular data from a to...
Article
Angiostrongylus vasorum, Crenosoma vulpis and Capillaria aerophila are the most common lungworms of domestic and wild canids. We investigated the short- and long-term lungworm prevalence changes in the Swiss fox population with a focus on A. vasorum. Between 2012 and 2017, lungs and hearts of 533 foxes from north-eastern Switzerland were necropsied...
Article
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The metacestode of Echinococcus multilocularis is the etiological agent of alveolar echinococcosis. The metacestode stage used for research is maintained in rodents by serial passages. In order to determine whether cryopreservation of E. multilocularis metacestodes would be suitable for long-term maintenance and replace serial passages, isolates of...
Article
Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is a zoonotic disease caused by a complex of species known as Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato. CE is endemic in Argentina, Chile, Peru, Uruguay and the South part of Brazil. In contrast, little is known regarding the presence of CE in Bolivia. In this study, 35 cysts isolated from livestock (mostly from the Department...
Article
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Background: Human cystic and alveolar echinococcosis are among the priority neglected zoonotic diseases for which WHO advocates control. The incidence of both cystic echinococcosis and alveolar echinococcosis has increased substantially in the past 30 years in Kyrgyzstan. Given the scarcity of adequate data on the local geographical variation of th...
Article
Control of cystic echinococcosis (CE) relies on interrupting Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato transmission through interventions in dogs and livestock. However, primary prevention measures aimed at avoiding ingestion of Echinococcus eggs may help reduce the burden of human CE. CE is generally considered, to variable extents, to be foodborne, but...
Article
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Alveolar echinococcosis is a parasitic disease caused by the tapeworm larval stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. This zoonotic disease has not been known to occur in Croatia. We report a confirmed case of human alveolar echinococcosis in a patient in Croatia who had never visited a known E. multilocularis-endemic area.
Article
Toxoplasma gondii-infected pigs play a major role as a source of infection for humans and detection of high-risk herds is essential to implement control measures at the farm level. The aim of this study was to determine whether oral fluid (OF) could be used as a matrix to detect antibodies against T. gondii in infected pigs by immunoblot (IB). For...
Article
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Infection of humans by the larval stage of the tapeworms Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato or Echinococcus multilocularis causes the life-threatening zoonoses cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE). Although cystic liver lesions are a hallmark of both diseases, course, prognosis, and patients’ management decisively differ betw...
Article
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Wild mustelids and canids are definitive hosts of Taenia and Versteria spp. while rodents act as natural intermediate hosts. Rarely, larval stages of these parasites can cause serious zoonoses. In Europe, four cases of Taenia martis cysticercosis have been diagnosed in immunocompetent women, and two cases in zoo primates since 2013. In North Americ...
Article
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Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato comprises a number of recognized species which cause cystic echinococcosis (CE) in humans and intermediate hosts. These species have particular geographic distributions, with E. granulosus sensu stricto (genotypes G1/2/3 and micro variants) being most widely spread. In Lithuania, E. intermedius (G7) is known to be...
Article
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Echinococcus multilocularis is the etiologic agent of alveolar echinococcosis (AE), a severe and potentially fatal larval cestode infection primarily affecting the liver. AE is known to occur in dead-end intermediate hosts, including humans and nonhuman primates. Between 1999 and 2016, AE was diagnosed in seven western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gor...
Article
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Almost any warm-blooded creature can be an intermediate host for Toxoplasma gondii. However, sexual reproduction of T. gondii occurs only in felids, wherein fertilisation of haploid macrogametes by haploid microgametes, results in diploid zygotes, around which a protective wall develops, forming unsporulated oocysts. Unsporulated oocysts are shed i...
Article
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For a long time, wildlife carnivores have been disregarded for their potential in transmitting zoonotic nematodes. However, human activities and politics (e.g., fragmentation of the environment, land use, recycling in urban settings) have consistently favoured the encroachment of urban areas upon wild environments, ultimately causing alteration of...
Poster
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Human echinococcosis is a neglected parasitic zoonosis caused by tapeworms of the genus Echinococcus. Given that human echinococcosis is a serious threat to human health in Kyrgyzstan, we investigated its incidence and geographical distribution to target public health interventions and foster further research on potential associated risk factors in...
Article
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Parasites are important food-borne pathogens. Their complex lifecycles, varied transmission routes, and prolonged periods between infection and symptoms mean that the public health burden and relative importance of different transmission routes are often difficult to assess. Furthermore, there are challenges in detection and diagnostics, and variat...
Article
Over a 2-yr period, four Goeldi's monkeys ( Callimico goeldii) died in a private zoo due to infections with the spirurid nematode Pterygodermatites nycticebi. Therapeutic measures with different anthelmintics were not successful. Due to the severe consequences caused by these infections, different actions were initiated, including sanitation measur...
Article
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Introduction: Diarrhea in calves is one of the most important cattle diseases in Switzerland. The diagnosis and treatment of calf diarrhea represent a major challenge. Single-celled Cryptosporidium parasites are the most prevalent causative agents of calf diarrhea besides rotavirus in the first weeks of life, and are responsible for about 50% of d...
Article
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Purpose of Review Cystic and alveolar echinococcosis, caused by Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato and E. multilocularis, respectively, and Taenia solium cysticercosis are serious but neglected zoonotic diseases, caused by extra-intestinal cestode (tapeworm) infections. Humans are dead-end hosts for Echinococcus spp and acquire the infections by up...
Article
Full-text available
Human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a highly pathogenic zoonotic parasitic disease caused by Echinococcus multilocularis. An ultrasound study in southern Kyrgyzstan during 2012 revealed a prevalence of 4.2% probable or confirmed AE and an additional 2.2% possible AE, representing an emerging situation. The risk for probable or confirmed AE was si...
Article
Background: The "hygiene hypothesis" suggests that a western way of life, including the extended use of anti-infective drugs, a high standard of hygiene and the resulting reduced exposure to microorganisms, could be one of the possible explanations for the increasing prevalence of allergic diseases in humans and animals. Objectives: we wished to...