Perry Labron Carter

Perry Labron Carter
Texas Tech University | TTU · Department of Geography

Phd. Ohio State 1998

About

34
Publications
20,862
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415
Citations
Citations since 2017
14 Research Items
275 Citations
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Introduction
Perry Labron Carter currently works at the Department of Geography, Texas Tech University. Perry does research in Quantitative Social Research and Social Theories of Race.

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
While Mount Vernon, Monticello, Montpelier, and Highland work to recover the lives of people enslaved by Washington, Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe, their institutional missions emphasize the importance of these four men within American history. The resulting impediments to honoring Black lives within these spaces can be best understood using the a...
Book
Full-text available
Remembering Enslavement explores plantation museums as sites for contesting and reforming public interpretations of slavery in the American South. Emerging out of a three-year National Science Foundation grant (2014–17), the book turns a critical eye toward the growing inclusion of the formerly enslaved within these museums, specifically examining...
Article
The Los Angeles River provides residents with much-needed access to nature and recreation opportunities in a city plagued by a lack of parks. Park access and use in Los Angeles varies greatly along racial and class lines, artifacts of the city’s history. Inequalities exist in how and where people can access urban nature and parks. Fishing on the L....
Chapter
In the United States, visitors to heritage sites have been steadily declining, and in the wake of this phenomenon, these sites have often turned to edutainment as a way to diversify methods to earn diminishing revenue in an increasingly competitive heritage tourism market. The term edutainment is a portmanteau (education/entertainment) signifying t...
Article
This paper recounts a “Roots” tour of Ghana that took place in 2014. Roots tours are African tours specifically marketed toward African-American travelers. Tours include stops associated with the trans-Atlantic slave trade as well as sites of a more general cultural interest. The paper focuses on the encounters of tourists with Ghana. Specifically,...
Article
Full-text available
This article, structured as a prompt-and-response work, is authored by members of a research team investigating how slavery is absent and present at tourism plantation museums in the U.S. South. The prompt for the discussion grew out of E. Arnold Modlin’s concern that, even at museums where narratives and landscapes center on enslaved people, the p...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental inequality assumes a near proximity of environmental health hazards, hazardous waste processing and releasing facilities to minority and low-income communities. Research in environmental inequality and environment justice over the past twenty years suggests that hazardous waste facilities are often located near minority and low-income...
Article
Full-text available
Museums and heritage tourism sites are highly curated places of memory work whose function is the assembling and ordering of space and narrative to contour visitors’ experiences of the past. Variations in such experiences within and between sites, however, necessitates a method that: (1) captures how guides, visitors, and exhibits interact within s...
Article
Full-text available
Tourists come to museums with varied expectations and leave appreciating different aspects of their presentations. Thus, tourists/audiences are primed to see, hear, and experience certain representations and narratives when they enter museums. This is particularly so with plantation museums. Most Americans possess at the very least a vague sense of...
Presentation
The City of Los Angeles plans to spend $1.3 billion in Los Angeles River revitalization. The river is a human created landscape; the biota and hydrology of the river depend on, and serve human activity. Currently, the fish assemblages of the river are dominated by exotic fish species such as Common Carps (Cyprinus carpio), Tilapias (Oreochromis spp...
Presentation
The City of Los Angeles is planning a controversial $1.3 billion plan to revitalize the LA River. Despite recent media attention and legalization, fishing on the LA River is still surrounded by a stigma of uncertainty and secrecy. A variety of methods have been employed to assess the behavior of fishermen in past studies, however no such study has...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the responses of 448 tourists to an exit survey at four Louisiana River Road tourist plantations. We investigate and discuss the relationships between the demographics of the tourists and their interests as they relate to tourist plantations. Cluster analysis of the visitors' interests indicates that visitors typically fall in...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines two southern Louisiana plantation museums: Laura and Oak Alley, using a framework that stresses the narrative power and politics of these heritage sites. Located a mile from each other along the Mississippi River, they present two similar yet different narratives of the antebellum American South. Laura places more emphasis on th...
Article
Full-text available
The literatures on urban forestry, environmental justice, and Marxist urban political ecology are considered through empirical attention to the localized racial and ethnic politics which spatially differentiate urban socio-natural landscapes. In the American Southwest, urban landscapes reflect a history in which Anglo Whites were able to distance t...
Chapter
Full-text available
This study examines members of the African-American African Diaspora's search for belonging and identity. The study's route into this world is via YouTube videos of tours of slave castle. The videos are of African American visitors to Cape Coast slave castle off the coast of Ghana. Cape Coast, built in 1653 by the Swedes, functioned as a holding de...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents the results of a content analysis and a thematic analysis of undergraduate students’ essays on the Middle East, specifically on the nation of Iran. The students were all members of a world regional geography class taught at a public west Texas university during the Fall of 2002. These students’ writings provide a particular re...
Presentation
Lubbock has a long history of segregation and environmental inequality. Recent literature shows significant inequalities whereby Lubbock’s African American community is located closer to environmental health hazards than other demographic groups. Currently, the African American community in Lubbock remains spatially restricted and it was not until...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the characteristics and opinions of tourists visiting Laura Plantation Museum in southern Louisiana, paying close attention to their interest in slavery relative to other narrative themes presented at the site. Laura is noted for its “big house” as well as its remaining slave quarters, but museums are built as much around narr...
Presentation
Environmental inequality is the notion that the spatial distribution of environmental health hazards, hazardous waste processing and releasing facilities is unequally distributed across space, with ethnic and racial minority communities being disproportionally impacted. Prior research has found that hazardous waste facilities are more often located...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is a response to Bonnett' s call to examine Whiteness in its spatial diversity. Representations of women' s bodies in advertisements and the underlying White nationalist discourse they reflect is this study' s point of entry. Ostensibly, this is an examination of billboards in Central America, but it is also an exegesis of Whiteness and...
Article
Full-text available
The past two decades have witnessed momentous changes on the American South's heritage landscape. First, and most dramatically, ascendant civil rights museums have established themselves as bona fide heritage attractions. Second, and more subtly, a nascent movement on the part of plantation house museums is afoot to engage with the lives and labour...
Article
Full-text available
Plantation museums would appear to be natural sites in which to learn about the lives of enslaved Africans and African-Americans in the US. Marx describes a commodity fetish as occurring when the link between labor and the product of labor has been broken when human wrought objects appear to come from nowhere. Plantation museums are a peculiar type...
Article
Full-text available
This article reviews how race, quantification, and raced quantification have been used and written about in geography. Its two primary arguments are that race should be more central in the discipline and that a reluctance to address ontological and epistemological issues has left quantitative geography methodologically impoverished. These two issue...
Article
Full-text available
This paper deals with race, space and leisure travel. It enquires into the differences between African-American and White travel behaviour while challenging existing theoretical explanations for these differences. This work aims to extend previous research on racialized leisure through utilizing a multi-method, multiple data sources approach to ill...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the responses of over 1000 tourists to an exit survey at Laura Plantation, a tourist museum site located outside of New Orleans, Louisiana. Using Critical Race Theory, we evaluate visitor interest in slavery at the plantation compared to other, more dominant narratives commonly associated with promoting plantation history thro...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores women's travel behaviors during their commutes from home to work. The type of women's work being examined in this study is the rapidly developing customer information services industry - call centers. As in most of the industry, the call centers in this study employ a largely female workforce. The underlying assumption of this a...
Article
Full-text available
Nella Larsen's 1929 novel, Passing, is a psychological drama centering around two fair-skinned women. One, Clare Kendry, passes as the White wife of a financially successful racist; the other, Irene Redfield, is a ‘race woman’ living in upper Manhattan during the era of the Renaissance Harlem. Clare and Irene are undecidables, neither White nor Bla...
Article
Social science research on the struggles of early and contemporary independent African-American travel agents represents a void in the literature. These agents experienced serious obstacles to survival during the past half-century, not only during times of racial segregation, but more recently with airlines and government regulations, expensive tec...
Article
Full-text available
Social science research on the struggles of early and contemporary independent African-American travel agents represents a void in the literature. These agents experienced serious obstacles to survival during the past half-century, not only during times of racial segregation, but more recently with airlines and government regulations, expensive tec...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--Ohio State University, 1998. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 143-152). Advisor: Morton E. O'Kelly, Dept. of Geography.

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