Pernille Hansen

Pernille Hansen
Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences · Department of Humanities

PhD

About

15
Publications
4,105
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Citations
Introduction
I am interested in lexical processing and in children's early lexical development. My research has a cross-linguistic and multilingual perspective, and is in part motivated by the need for improvements in language assessment for clinical In my PhD project, I asked how linguistic factors may account for the composition of monolingual and bilingual children’s lexicons. My postdoc concerned lexical access in multilinguals with dementia.

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Social sciences researchers emphasize that new technologies can overcome the limitations of small and homogenous samples. In research on early language development, which often uses parental reports, taking the testing online might be particularly compelling. Due to logistical limitations, previous studies on bilingual children have explored the la...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we investigate a prosodic-phonetic feature in child-directed speech within a dynamic, complex, interactive theoretical framework. We focus on vocalic intrusions, commonly occurring in Norwegian word initial consonant clusters. We analysed child-directed speech from nine Norwegian-speaking mothers to their children, aged 2;6, 4, and 6...
Article
This publication provides an overview of research on a large range of topics relating to language processing and language use from a life-span perspective. It is unique in covering and combining psycholinguistic and sociolinguistic approaches, discussing questions such as: Is it beneficial to speak more than one language when growing old? How are l...
Article
Full-text available
Young children simplify word initial consonant clusters by omitting or substituting one (or both) of the elements. Vocalic insertion, coalescence and metathesis are said to be used more seldom (McLeod, van Doorn & Reed, 2001). Data from Norwegian children, however, have shown vocalic insertion to be more frequently used (Simonsen, 1990; Simonsen, G...
Article
Full-text available
The study investigates code-switching by multilingual persons with dementia in two different speech contexts, picture naming tests and spontaneous conversation. It combines a psycholinguistic perspective on cognitive and linguistic skills with a qualitative conversation analytic approach to understanding the functions and appropriateness of code-sw...
Article
Full-text available
The mental lexicon is dynamic and changes throughout the lifespan, but how does it begin? Previous research has established that children's first words depend on their communicative needs, but also on their phonetic repertoire and phonological preferences. In this paper, we focus on the phonological characteristics of children's first words, primar...
Poster
Full-text available
Patterns in word associations may shed light on how the mental lexicon is organised. Taking a usage-based view, we expect associations based on perceived similarities in form or meaning, as well as associations based in patterns of use. Five different participant groups performed a free word association test in Norwegian; young adult L1 speakers of...
Article
Purpose As a contribution to the endeavour of developing appropriate tools for bilingual language assessment, this paper investigates the concurrence between two new tools from the recent COST Action IS0804 (Bi-SLI), and the differences between children across two different migrant communities. Approach Two new tools from the battery Language Impa...
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates the cross-linguistic comparability of the newly developed lexical assessment tool Cross-linguistic Lexical Tasks (LITMUS-CLT). LITMUS-CLT is a part the Language Impairment Testing in Multilingual Settings (LITMUS) battery (Armon-Lotem, de Jong & Meir, 2015). Here we analyse results on receptive and expressive word knowledg...
Article
The novel assessment tool Cross-Linguistic Lexical Tasks (LITMUS-CLT) aims for comparable cross-linguistic assessment of multilingual children’s lexical skills by basing each language version on two language-specific variables: age of acquisition (AoA) and complexity index (CI), a novel measure related to phonology, morphology, exposure and etymolo...
Article
This article analyses how a set of psycholinguistic factors may account for children’s lexical development. Age of acquisition is compared to a measure of lexical development based on vocabulary size rather than age, and robust regression models are used to assess the individual and joint effects of word class, frequency, imageability and phonologi...
Article
Abstract All words have properties linked to form, meaning and usage patterns which influence how easily they are accessed from the mental lexicon in language production, perception and comprehension. Examples of such properties are imageability, phonological and morphological complexity, word class, argument structure, frequency of use and age of...
Article
In this article, we present a study of imageability ratings for a set of 1599 Norwegian words (896 nouns, 483 verbs and 220 adjectives) from a web-based survey. To a large extent, the results are in accordance with previous studies of other languages: high imageability scores in general, higher imageability scores for nouns than for verbs, and an i...

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The PolkaNorski project investigates the development of language skills and world knowledge in Polish-Norwegian multilingual children and their monolingual peers in Poland and Norway. The project will investigate the relationship between children’s language skills, world knowledge and the linguistic, cultural and educational environment in which they grow up. We follow multilingual Polish-Norwegian children and majority speaking Norwegian and Polish children aged 2-6 years through four work packages.
Project
The aim of MultiLing Dementia is to study the linguistic, cognitive and social effects of dementia in multilingual speakers on the individual level, in interaction, and in the way that society deals with these issues.