Perin Westerhof Nyman

Perin Westerhof Nyman
University of St Andrews · School of Computer Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

5
Publications
19
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Introduction
I research Scottish court culture (late medieval/early modern), and the history of dress and textiles, and I am particularly interested in material culture as a means of building and displaying personal and relational identities (e.g., livery, mourning). I have extensive experience in designing and constructing historical garments for museums and education. I currently work with Open Virtual Worlds, making virtual reconstructions of historic sites and objects to preserve and transmit heritage.
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - May 2021
Dalhousie University
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Lecturer on THEA 4407 & THEA 4408 (Aesthetics of Historical Dress) in Costume Studies, Fountain School of Performing Arts
January 2018 - May 2021
University of St Andrews
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • ME1006: Scotland and the English Empire 1070-1500
Education
September 2016 - December 2020
University of St Andrews
Field of study
  • Mediaeval History
September 2015 - August 2016
University of Glasgow
Field of study
  • MLitt Art History: Dress and Textile Histories
September 2010 - May 2015
Dalhousie University
Field of study
  • Combined Honours in Costume Studies & History

Publications

Publications (5)
Article
While the Scottish royal household participated in the wider development of mourning traditions in the late fifteenth century and employed mourning dress as a political tool from at least the turn of the sixteenth century, surviving evidence is extremely limited. Records for the funerals of Queens Madeleine de Valois ( d. 1537) and Margaret Tudor (...
Thesis
This thesis examines the use of meaningful and symbolic dress at the late medieval Scottish royal court, arguing that group displays of colour-coded clothing, exemplified by livery and mourning dress, played key political roles both in the day-to-day functioning of the court and royal household and at large-scale ceremonial events. The discussion t...

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