Percy Mutseka Lunga

Percy Mutseka Lunga
University of Pretoria | UP · Department of Biochemistry, Genetics and Microbiology

About

2
Publications
113
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
0
Citations
Introduction
Percy Mutseka Lunga currently works at the Department of Genetics, University of Pretoria. Percy does research in Stable isotope probing and single cell genome research of chemolithoautotrophs. His current research is "Disentangling the role of Chemolithoautotrophs in the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide."
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - January 2019
University of Pretoria
Position
  • PhD Student
January 2016 - June 2017
University of Pretoria
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Tutorial teaching and student assistance with MLB111 course
Education
January 2016 - December 2018
University of Pretoria
Field of study
  • Microbiology
August 2011 - September 2014
University of Zimbabwe
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences

Publications

Publications (2)
Article
We present four Lentisphaerae metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) from the South Atlantic Ocean. The medium-quality genomes, affiliated with the family of Lentisphaeraceae, ranged from 4.86 to 5.46 Mbp and harbored the genetic capacity to produce secondary metabolites. This resource provides a basis for investigating the functional attributes of th...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Due to their role as obligate parasites of marine microorganisms, viruses are primary mediators of marine biogeochemical cycles. Recent studies have provided irrevocable evidence showing that viruses augment the metabolisms of bacteria and archaea through expression of auxiliary metabolic genes (AMGs). Several studies have shown that AMG...

Network

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The major aim of this project is to evaluate the role of chemoautotrophic microbial (picoplanktonic) communities in ocean systems to the fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide. This will be done by following the listed objectives of the study: 1. To evaluate the seasonal qualitative and quantitative contribution of heterotrophic and chemoautotrophic carbon dioxide fixation in oceanic systems, particularly in the ‘dark’ (sub-photic zone) ocean. 2. To asses the microbial taxa linked to carbon dioxide uptake. 3. To determine which specific chemoautotrophic taxa are likely to contribute significantly to oceanic carbon dioxide assimilation processes.