Per-Olof Grönberg

Per-Olof Grönberg
Luleå University of Technology | LTU · Department of Business Administration, Technology and Social Sciences (ETS)

PhD, History

About

16
Publications
2,000
Reads
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67
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2011 - June 2014
Umeå University
Position
  • Researcher
January 2008 - June 2014
Umeå University
Position
  • First senior research assistant

Publications

Publications (16)
Article
Full-text available
This article connects to the discussion on skills and knowledge during the early industrialisation. It focuses on how two out of four technical secondary schools in Sweden (Malmö and Borås) lived up to their aims communicated by politicians and other stakeholders: to provide emerging industries and crafts in their regions with technicians and to pr...
Article
Full-text available
Differences in adult mortality were studied between natives and domestic and international migrants in three Northwestern European cities during different stages of the epidemiological transition. Event history analysis was conducted for mortality risk at ages 30+ using life course data retrieved from three large historical demographic micro-level...
Article
Sweden’s rapid economic growth after World War II meant that the native labour supply was incapable of meeting the high demand, especially for industrial labourers. Three agreements on organised collective transfers were signed, but a large majority of the labour migrants came on their own initiative. Not all applicants were equally welcomed. In th...
Article
Full-text available
Processes of social inclusion and exclusion among internal migrants in Antwerp, Rotterdam and Stockholm in the period 1850-1930 are studied with the help of data on partner choice and marriage of migrants who moved to these cities as singles. In practice, four outcomes related to meeting and mating are linked in our conceptual model to four accultu...
Article
Full-text available
A longitudinal approach is used to describe and explain processes of social inclusion and exclusion among different groups of migrants in Antwerp and Stockholm (1846– 1926), in terms of access to marriage and reproduction. In this way we want to get a better idea about the factors which facilitated or hampered the social inclusion of migrants upon...
Chapter
The view of preindustrial Sweden as a geographically static society is distorted; migration was a part of everyday life and the most common demographic feature. Early 19th-century Swedes changed residence 10 times on average during their lifetime, which is only twice less than the present day. Distances moved were shorter, however. People moved bet...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
In today’s Swedish debate, the students’ lack of interest in science and technology is pointed out as a major problem; there is a fear that Sweden will be left behind in the technological race. Another problem is the weak interest among young people to train for at career in industry; several VET programs aimed at the industry have been closed down during the recent years and as a consequence firms, for example in the engineering industry, have problems finding qualified workers. As a solution to regional needs among today’s firms, several technical colleges (Teknikcollege) have been established since the turn of the Millennium, and are now present in all parts of Sweden. The situation is in some ways similar to the mid- 1800s when lack of qualified workers for the growing industry proved a severe obstacle for modernisation and further industrial development. The labour force was normally trained on the job, as apprentices or help workers; even foremen and persons at higher positions got most of their training directly at the workplace. The technical institutes in Stockholm and Gothenburg lacked the support of preparatory schools, emphasising mathematics and natural sciences that could prepare students for higher technical education. The scarcity of technical education at medium and lower levels together with poorly prepared students at higher level technical education, constitute the background for the regionally based technical secondary schools (tekniska elementarskolor) that were established from the 1850s. Our project aims at investigating the strategic considerations and forces behind the geographic dispersion of the technical secondary schools and the role of the schools in regional industrial development during the period 1854-1920. Within the first field, some crucial question are to be considered: What kind of discussions preceded the decisions about where to establish the technical secondary schools? What role did regional economic interests play? Who were the stakeholders and how did they argue in favour of their sake? Within the second field, we ask questions like: How did the schools and their teaching develop over time? How big were the catchment areas for students? To what extent did they stay in the region after graduation? To what extent were former students to become entrepreneurs and innovators?