Per Davidsson

Per Davidsson
QUT and Jönköping International Business School

PhD; Dr rer. pol. h.c.

About

268
Publications
190,791
Reads
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28,003
Citations
Citations since 2016
68 Research Items
14031 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202205001,0001,5002,000
201620172018201920202021202205001,0001,5002,000
Additional affiliations
October 2004 - June 2022
Queensland University of Technology
Position
  • Professor & Research Director
Description
  • Before requesting full texts, please check whether they are available at eprints.qut.edu.au.
June 1994 - June 2022
Jönköping University
Position
  • Professor
July 1985 - June 1990
Stockholm School of Economics
Position
  • Research Assistant; research fellow

Publications

Publications (268)
Article
Full-text available
I critique M&W's recent AMR article, noting questionable premises and conclusions partly due to underutilization of past progress that is readily available. As to myself, I find further rumination of the objective/subjective or discovered/created status of ill-defined "opportunities' to be quite pointless. As I say in the manuscript: "As history ha...
Article
Full-text available
In their review of venture creation process research, Davidsson and Gruenhagen (2021) identified two distinct types of process research: process as a journey through qualitative changes in content and process as a directional and temporal journey toward a goal. We revisit their findings with more robust methodology and find that these two are indee...
Article
Full-text available
We tested the drivers of spinoffs’ (that is, new firms started by ex-employees of incumbent firms) alliance network size through the lens of imprinting theory, using a large longitudinal sample of 145 newly founded spinoffs and 3,405 strategic alliances from 2001 to 2014 in the alliance-intensive mining industry. Our results revealed that whereas p...
Conference Paper
Building on the External Enabler Framework and prior research on digital entrepreneurship and innovation, we develop new theory of how entrepreneurial ventures can leverage societal crises to realize the extreme scaling potential enabled by digital technologies. Our theory posits a general pattern through which a) digital technologies provide basel...
Chapter
Full-text available
"External enabler" (EE) denotes nontrivial changes to the business environment-such as new technology, regulatory change, demographic and sociocultural trends, macroeconomic swings, and changes to the natural environment-that enable entrepreneurial pursuits. The EE framework was developed to increase knowledge accumulation in entrepreneurship and s...
Article
Although the phenomenon of hybrid entrepreneurs—individuals who work in paid and self-employment simultaneously—is prevalent, the psychological well-being of hybrid entrepreneurs has not been researched systematically to date. This is unlike research on paid employment and (assumed) full-time entrepreneurship, where psychological well-being has bee...
Article
Full-text available
While prior research suggests that entrepreneurial bricolage is often useful as a coping mechanism for resource-constrained new ventures, other accounts document detrimental effects of bricolage. As the conditions for effective bricolage have not been systematically examined in prior research, we develop and test theoretical explanations for some i...
Article
Full-text available
Spinoff firms are a common phenomenon in entrepreneurship where employees leave incumbent parent firms to found their own. Like other types of new firms, such new spinoffs face liabilities of newness and smallness. Previous research has emphasised the role of the initial endowments from their parent firm to overcome such liabilities. In this study,...
Article
For many digital ventures, acquiring financial resources in multiple rounds beyond seed funding to grow has become an important part of their entrepreneurial journey. The success rate of raising equity capital beyond their seed investments is, however, very low. Existing entrepreneurship studies on financial resource acquisition have explored separ...
Article
Full-text available
As a contribution to research and theorizing on the economic role of new firm formation, we undertake the first ever investigation of regional employment effects of the entry of new social firms. Our study is guided by an established model of the employment effects of new firm entry over time and provides a direct comparison to the employment effec...
Article
Full-text available
To address challenges constraining prior research on evaluation of entrepreneurial projects, we develop the concept of Venture Idea Assessment (VIA) and validate an instrument to capture it. VIA concerns the assessment of Venture Ideas (VI) unbundled from assessment of any agents with whom they may be associated. The assessment can be performed by...
Article
Extending earlier critiques, I suggest that continued use of Shanian discovery and Alvarez-Barnean creation views and their respective standpoints on “opportunities” would constrain future entrepreneurship research. Instead, I suggest venture creation be recognized as the field’s true core, with or without the opportunity concept. Within a big tent...
Article
Full-text available
The enabling influence of environmental changes—be they technological, regulatory, demographic, sociocultural, or otherwise—on emerging ventures receives a growing interest from researchers and practitioners. To support knowledge accumulation in this important area, we systematically review and integrate research that is dispersed across discipline...
Article
Full-text available
For decades, entrepreneurship and strategy research has been dominated by agent-centric and inward-looking theoretical perspectives. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates the limits of this stance, as its influence on business has been both enormous and palpable. For the most part, the effects of the pandemic are no doubt negative. Business re...
Article
Full-text available
This article shows how small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can enhance the level of corporate entrepreneurship through alliance management capabilities. The findings from a sample of 272 suppliers to the mining industry demonstrate that the constituting dimensions of alliance portfolio management capability (that is, partnering proactiveness...
Article
Full-text available
In searching for conceptualizations that offer an alternative perspective to “entrepreneurial opportunities”, the notion of external enablers has recently been suggested for capturing the influence on entrepreneurial action and outcomes exerted by external conditions like new technologies, regulatory or demographic shifts, and changes to the socio-...
Article
We review new venture creation process research in leading journals over the past 30 years, applying a broad view of “process.” While we find a rich and varied literature with significant quantitative and qualitative growth, the review reveals considerable room for future contributions in this important area of entrepreneurship research. In an agen...
Article
This article investigates how two types of proactive environmental strategies (PESs) – proactive green management and green political influence – affect firm performance directly and under varying conditions characterising corporate venturing activities (domestic versus international). The results obtained by analysing a multi-informant dataset rev...
Article
Full-text available
As a contribution to research and theorizing on the economic role of new firm formation, we undertake the first ever investigation of regional employment effects of the entry of new social firms. Our study is guided by an established model of the employment effects of new firm entry over time and provides a direct comparison to the employment effec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Digital platforms that facilitate interactions among users underpin the business models of some of the world's most successful ventures. What makes digital platform business models so successful is their potential for network effects. Existing research on digital platforms and network effects has largely focused on how platform operators can attrac...
Article
Digitization is arguably currently the single most important force in entrepreneurship and innovation. In this special issue editorial, we shed light on the current state of digital entrepreneurship and digital innovation research to take stock of past research and identify opportunities for the future. The 11 papers in this special issue present a...
Chapter
Per Davidsson discusses in the following chapter how he and David met and how they became close friends and collaborators. Using the economic analogy of knowledge spillovers, Davidsson creates a narrative of how David has built friendships across the world while also becoming one of the most prolific scholars in his field. These insights show how w...
Article
Returnee entrepreneurs are argued to be important contributors to innovation and economic development in emerging economies by transferring advanced knowledge and skills to their home countries. To date the literature has predominantly treated returnee entrepreneurs as a homogeneous phenomenon; not accounting for variabilities in types and orientat...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of the breadth and depth of international experience on subsequent new venture internationalisation and to what extent growth aspirations moderate these relationships. Drawing upon previous literature on international new ventures, human capital and growth aspirations, we tested our hypotheses usin...
Article
Digital ventures are formed around ideas that have digital artifacts at their core. We develop theory that explains how the composition of digital artifacts influences venture creation processes. First, we develop propositions that link differences in the embodiment and coupling of digital artifact components to tensions in venture creation process...
Article
Entrepreneurship scholars have actively studied issues pertaining to new venture network development. In this study, we revisit the empirical relationship between new venture’s initial alliance at time of founding and its subsequent network growth by conducting a quasi-replication of Milanov and Fernhaber (2009). Further, we extend their research t...
Article
Full-text available
This study aims to discern the duration of venture creation processes that end in successful venture emergence as well as those ending with abandonment. Discerning duration is essential to understand a process since every process unfolds over time. However, identifying correct venture creation duration is tricky because available panel data sets in...
Article
Full-text available
We develop theory about how and when digital technologies enable new venture creation processes. We identify two fundamental properties of digital technologies—specificity and relationality—and develop propositions that link these properties to six enabling mechanisms: compression, conservation, expansion, substitution, combination, and generation....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
It is widely acknowledged that phenomena like new technologies, regulatory or demographic shifts, and changes to the socio-cultural, political or natural environment are important “external enablers” of entrepreneurial action and success. There is also increasing agreement that on the level of the (emerging) venture, entrepreneurship is most fruitf...
Chapter
This chapter offers some “business school researcher” observations and speculations about current and possible future developments in the field of entrepreneurship research. Particular topics include the delineation of the “entrepreneurship research” field and community; data and data sources; the quest for increased theoretical precision, and dema...
Article
Highlights - Wood's (2007) claim that any replacement constructs are subject to the same problems as “entrepreneurial opportunity” is false. - External circumstances, imagined future ventures, and individuals’ favorability assessments are ontologically very different entities which also pertain to different levels of analysis. - Further, these el...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Musings on the prospects of entrepreneurial ethnography. In Proceedings of the Princeton Kauffman Conference 2017. Princeton University, United States of America, pp. 1-12.
Article
Purpose The majority of emerging and young firms work under resource constraints. This has made researchers highlight the importance of resourcefulness. Perhaps the most important theoretical development in this context is the emerging, behavioral theory of entrepreneurial bricolage. However, although academic interest is increasing, research on en...
Book
Full-text available
Regrettably, the publisher’s copy editing process introduced numerous errors into the manuscript without providing author inquiries about the erroneous changes, which is why they remain in the published product. The publisher is correcting the electronic original and will pulp remaining copies of the print edition containing the errors. However the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Whether or not nascent entrepreneurs should spend time developing a business plan is still an issue of debate for both scholars and practitioners. This chapter contributes to a better understanding on the uses and expectations of planning among business start-ups by taking a deeper and more granular approach than previous research. The chapter exam...
Article
In this short essay I offer some "business researcher" advice on how to leverage a strong background in psychology when attempting to contribute to the maturing field of "entrepreneurship research". Psychologists can benefit from within-discipline research, e.g. on emergence, small groups, fit, and expertise as well as method strengths in, e.g. exp...
Chapter
This chapter discusses significant developments in the field of entrepreneurship research. These include, but are not limited to: (a) considerable growth in volume, quality, and theory-drivenness; (b) a drift of the main emphasis from small scale and independent ownership towards newness and novelty realized through a multitude of organizational so...
Article
Ramoglou & Tsang's (R&T) article “A realist perspective of entrepreneurship: Opportunities as propensities” is a recent, potentially influential addition to the literature on “entrepreneurial opportunities”. This short communication argues that R&T's intellectual exercise largely fails to move matters forward on the two most central problems with p...
Chapter
What is it we are really trying to do, when doing “research”? This chapter aims to set a sound foundation for more detailed discussions of methods issues. This also aims to organize familiar research vocabulary (e.g., sample, inference, validity, model specification, boundary conditions, causality) within a holistic framework. Further, the chapter...
Chapter
How do we find out what our data really are saying? Once all the evidence is collected, the researcher still has many choices to make in the analysis of the data, and these choices affect conclusions. This short chapter discusses some challenges that are particularly pronounced in entrepreneurship research. These are the process- and multilevel nat...
Chapter
What is it that we are trying to explain? Nothing could be more important in research than clarity about the explanandum, the “dependent variable.” This chapter discusses explananda at different stages of the entrepreneurial process and at different levels of analysis. The spectrum stretches from an individual’s intention to engage in entrepreneurs...
Chapter
What drives the progress and success of start-up processes? The “entrepreneurship nexus” perspective holds that entrepreneurial processes and their outcomes are shaped by the interplay of individuals and the “opportunities” they pursue. This chapter argues that progress within this perspective has been hampered by inescapable complexities inherent...
Chapter
Who and what should we study in entrepreneurship research? What type of entities, how many, and which particular ones should we study in order to effectively answer our entrepreneurship-related research questions? Starting from the axiom that social science is not like opinion polling, this chapter provides a somewhat unorthodox view on sampling an...
Chapter
How can we measure things like “entrepreneurial self-efficacy” or “start-up success” so that we can test whether our theories hold up? This chapter starts with an extended discussion of standard issues pertaining to operationalization of theoretical constructs (levels of measurement, measurement validity, and measurement error) in an integrated and...
Chapter
How and why can theory help us understand entrepreneurial phenomena? The contemplative nature of theory may seem antithetical to the bold action associated with entrepreneurship. Theory is important in research because it is the abstracted and reflected sensemaking of theory that makes empirical observations meaningful. However, an exaggerated focu...
Chapter
How can we develop more solid knowledge about entrepreneurship? Like in other fields of research, the truth is that we never know the truth, but that we can arrive at increasingly accurate approximation of it. In this collective quest of knowledge development, statistical significance testing is a sadly overused tool, while replication of prior res...
Chapter
What is entrepreneurship? To do research on entrepreneurship, we first need to decide what we mean by that term. A challenge here is that entrepreneurship has many definitions and connotations. As a societal phenomenon, this chapter proposes that entrepreneurship be defined as the competitive behaviors that drive the market process, alternatively p...
Article
Full-text available
We hypothesize that a major macroeconomic crisis triggers four alternative responses among nascent entrepreneurs: disengagement, delay, compensation, and adaptation. We also suggest that commitment and ambition (or “high potential”) moderate these responses. Our most important finding is the relative absence of behavioral crisis responses. However,...
Book
Full-text available
In this book, one of the most highly recognized entrepreneurship scholars shares in a personal and readable way his rich experience and ideas on how entrepreneurship can be researched. Entrepreneurship is a phenomenon of tremendous societal importance. It is also an elusive phenomenon, which makes researching it fun, fascinating―and frustrating at...
Book
In this book, one of the most highly recognized entrepreneurship scholars shares in a personal and readable way his rich experience and ideas on how entrepreneurship can be researched. Entrepreneurship is a phenomenon of tremendous societal importance. It is also an elusive phenomenon, which makes researching it fun, fascinating—and frustrating at...
Article
Honig and Samuelsson (2014) and Delmar (2015) recently had an exchange in this journal related to a replication-and-extension attempt of two papers which originally arrived at different conclusions based on the same data set. This commentary provides further clarification on the issues and links the debate to broader issues scholarly culture and pr...
Article
A long-held assumption in entrepreneurship research is that normal (i.e., Gaussian) distributions characterize variables of interest for both theory and practice. We challenge this assumption by examining more than 12,000 nascent, young, and hyper-growth firms. Results reveal that variables which play central roles in resource-, cognition-, action-...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Our study aims to explain the possible roles of social network structures (Dodd & Patra, 2002) and informal investors (Bygrave et al., 2003) in determining countries' new firm formation rates. It is difficult to capture informal investment activities (Mason & Harrison, 2008), and even more difficult to figure out their social network structure (Hoa...
Article
Full-text available
The literature on “entrepreneurial opportunities” has grown rapidly since the publication of Shane and Venkataraman (2000). By directing attention to the earliest stages of development of new economic activities and organizations, this marks sound redirection of entrepreneurship research. However, our review shows that theoretical and empirical pro...
Chapter
On the macro-level, “Entrepreneurial Growth” can be understood as economic growth generated by entrepreneurial activities. This article focuses on the micro level, where “Entrepreneurial Growth” can have either of three meanings: a) the growth of owner-managed firms; b) the early growth that make start-ups become “real organizations” rather than ju...
Article
Many firms initially face significant resource constraints during attempts to develop and grow (Shepherd et al., 2000). One promising theory that explicitly links to ways entrepreneurial firms respond to resource constraints is bricolage (Lévi-Strauss, 1966). Bricolage is defined as “making do by applying combinations of the resources at hand to ne...
Article
This study draws on attribution theory (Weiner, 1985, 1986) and experiential learning theory (Argyris, 1976; Kolb, 1984) to explain the interdependencies among attributions, learning, and motivation to start a new firm after experiencing failure. The hypotheses are tested using a unique sample of 122 Swedish entrepreneurs who had recently experienc...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
While the importance of inter-organisational relationships in stimulating corporate entrepreneurship is well argued in the literature, little attention has been paid to how corporate capabilities for formation, development and integration of partnering relationships affect entrepreneurial activities in companies. From the analysis of a sample of 33...
Article
Firms face opposing incentives regarding when to make strategic decisions about their exploration ventures. On the one hand, postponing a decision can reduce uncertainty, while on the other hand, moving quickly allows one to capitalize on favorable market conditions. Drawing on theories of entrepreneurship, real options reasoning, and decision spee...
Article
In line with repeated recent calls for research on specific forms of growth rather than on an undifferentiated notion of “total growth,” our study contributes to the understanding of entrepreneurial growth. By this we mean growth through expansion into new geographic markets and/or via the introduction of new products or services. Building on Penro...
Article
Evidence suggests that both nascent and young firms (henceforth: “new firms”)—despite typically being small and resource-constrained—are sometimes able to innovate effectively. Such firms are seldom able to invest in lengthy and expensive development processes, which suggests that they may frequently rely instead on other pathways to generate innov...
Article
Despite increasing attention devoted to international entrepreneurship, little is known about firm-level entrepreneurship carried out by established small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in international markets. We apply the opportunity-based conceptualization of “Entrepreneurial Management” by Howard Stevenson to international corporate entre...
Article
Evidence-based practice in entrepreneurship requires effective communication of research findings. We focus on how research synopses can “promote” research to entrepreneurs. Drawing on marketing communications literature, we examine how message characteristics of research synopses affect their appeal. We demonstrate the utility of conjoint analysis...
Article
Full-text available
We support Shane and Venkataraman’s (2000) basic idea of an “entrepreneurship nexus” where characteristics of the actor as well as those of the “opportunity” they work on influence action and outcomes in the creation of new economic activities. However, a review of the literature reveals that very little progress has been made on the core issues pe...
Article
Full-text available
Applying Lazear's jack-of-all-trades theory, we investigate the formation of entrepreneurial skills in two data sets on innovative new firms. Our results suggest that traditional human capital indicators individually have little or no influence on entrepreneurial skills. However, consistent with Lazear's theory, those entrepreneurs who exhibit a va...
Article
Extending recent research on the importance of specific resources and skills for the internationalization of start-ups, this article tests a negative binomial model on a sample of 520 recently created high technology firms from the UK and Germany. The results show that previous international experience of entrepreneurs facilitates the rapid penetra...
Book
Full-text available
‘This collection of articles by an internationally recognized team of authors is a welcome addition to the literature on firm growth. The authors, singly and together, have previously made important contributions with regard to frameworks for understanding growth, as well as cutting-edge empirical research on the actual growth process. In this volu...
Article
Full-text available
Reflecting on real and perceived differences between European and North American research cultures, I challenge views that ‘European’ research is under appreciated or discriminated against, and caution against isolationist European positions. Instead, I argue that although no distinctive and coherent European tradition or culture really exists, the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We support Shane and Venkataraman’s (2000) basic idea of an “entrepreneurship nexus” where characteristics of the actor as well as those of the “opportunity” they work on influence action and outcomes in the creation of new economic activities. However, a review of the literature reveals that minimal progress has been made on the core issues pertai...
Article
Full-text available
Applying Lazear's jack-of-all-trades theory we investigate the formation of entrepreneurial skills in two datasets on innovative new firms. Our results suggest that traditional human capital indicators individually have little or no influence on entrepreneurial skills. However, consistent with Lazaer's theory those entrepreneurs who exhibit a varie...