Pengfei Yu

Pengfei Yu
Jinan University (Guangzhou, China) · Institute for Environmental and Climate Research

PhD

About

34
Publications
8,553
Reads
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1,198
Citations
Introduction
My research interests and expertise are stratospheric aerosols modeling. I am both a model developer and user. I am convinced that it is necessary to combine modeling and measurements to explore our nature. Detailed research interests are listed below: Stratospheric aerosol (smoke, volcano); Geoengineering; Wildfire smoke; Asian tropopause aerosol layer; Aerosol-cloud-radiation-climate interactions
Additional affiliations
August 2010 - present
University of Colorado Boulder
Position
  • Research Assistant
Education
August 2009 - August 2015
University of Colorado Boulder
Field of study
  • Atmospheric Science

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size-resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particl...
Article
Full-text available
An enhanced aerosol layer near the tropopause over Asia during the June-September period of the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) was recently identified using satellite observations. Its sources and climate impact are presently not well characterized. To improve understanding of this phenomenon, we made in situ aerosol measurements during summer 2015 fro...
Article
Full-text available
In 2017, western Canadian wildfires injected smoke into the stratosphere that was detectable by satellites for more than 8 months. The smoke plume rose from 12 to 23 kilometers within 2 months owing to solar heating of black carbon, extending the lifetime and latitudinal spread. Comparisons of model simulations to the rate of observed lofting indic...
Article
Full-text available
Many climate intervention (CI) methods have been proposed to offset greenhouse gas-induced global warming, but the practicalities regarding implementation have not received sufficient attention. Stratospheric aerosol injection (SAI) involves introducing large amounts of CI material well within the stratosphere to enhance the aerosol loading, thereb...
Article
Full-text available
Australian wildfires burning from December 2019 to January 2020 injected approximately 0.9 Tg of smoke into the stratosphere; this is the largest amount observed in the satellite era. A comparison of numerical simulations to satellite observations of the plume rise suggests that the smoke mass contained 2.5% black carbon. Model calculations project...
Article
Full-text available
Dust aerosols affect the radiative and energy balance at local and global scales by scattering 11 and absorbing sunlight and infrared light. Parameterizations of dust lifting, microphysics, as well as 12 physical and radiative properties of dust in climate models are still subject to large uncertainty. Here 13 we use a sectional aerosol model (CARM...
Preprint
The January 2022 Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai (HTHH) volcanic eruption injected a relatively small amount of SO 2 , but significantly more water into the stratosphere than previously seen in the modern satellite record. Here we show that the large amount of water resulted in large perturbations to stratospheric aerosol evolution. Our Community Earth S...
Article
Full-text available
We present a modification to the Community Aerosol and Radiation model for Atmospheres (CARMA) sectional ice microphysical model where we have added interactive nucleation of sulfates and heterogeneous nucleation onto dust in order to create a more comprehensive representation of ice nucleation within the CARMA sectional ice model. The convective w...
Article
Lightning generates nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the troposphere, an important precursor of tropospheric ozone (O3). The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is considered to be a global atmospheric background location with limited anthropogenic influences. However, the observed summertime surface O3 concentration on the TP is 25% higher than that in highly polluted r...
Article
Full-text available
Airborne mineral dust particles can act as natural seeds for cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere. However, the atmospheric abundance of dust is unconstrained in cirrus-forming regions, hampering our ability to predict these radiatively important clouds. Here we present global-scale measurements of dust aerosol abundance in the upper troposphere...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Large wildfires have been observed to inject smoke into the stratosphere, raising questions about their potential to affect the stratospheric ozone layer that protects life on Earth from biologically damaging ultraviolet radiation. Multiple observations of aerosol and NO 2 concentrations from three independent satellite instruments are...
Article
Glyoxal (Gly) and methylglyoxal (Mgly) are the intermediate products of several volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as well as the precursors of brown carbon and may play key roles in photochemical pollution and regional climate change in the Tibetan Plateau (TP). However, their sources and atmospheric behaviors in the TP remain unclear. During the s...
Article
Full-text available
Biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) accounts for 70-80% of submicron aerosol over the Amazon rainforest. However, uncertainties with regard to the chemical formation pathway, mass budget and radiative impact of BSOA in the region still remain high. To address the issue, we used a regional chemistry transport model (WRF-Chem-MOSAIC) to evaluat...
Article
Full-text available
The size of aerosol particles has fundamental effects on their chemistry and radiative effects. We explore those effects using aerosol size and composition data in the lowermost stratosphere along with calculations of light scattering. In the size range between about 0.1 and 1.0 µm diameter (accumulation mode), there are at least two modes of parti...
Preprint
Full-text available
The size of aerosol particles has fundamental effects on their chemistry and radiative effects. We explore those effects using aerosol size and composition data in the lowermost stratosphere along with calculations of light scattering. In the size range between about 0.1 and 1.0 µm diameter (accumulation mode), there are at least two modes of parti...
Article
Full-text available
Volcanic ash is often neglected in climate simulations because ash particles are assumed to have a short atmospheric lifetime, and to not participate in sulfur chemistry. After the Mt. Kelut eruption in 2014, stratospheric ash-rich aerosols were observed for months. Here we show that the persistence of super-micron ash is consistent with a density...
Article
Full-text available
The spatial distribution and properties of submicron organic aerosol (OA) are among the key sources of uncertainty in our understanding of aerosol effects on climate. Uncertainties are particularly large over remote regions of the free troposphere and Southern Ocean, where very few data have been available and where OA predictions from AeroCom Phas...
Article
Full-text available
Specified dynamics (SD) schemes relax the circulation in climate models toward a reference meteorology to simulate historical variability. These simulations are widely used to isolate the dynamical contributions to variability and trends in trace gas species. However, it is not clear if trends in the stratospheric overturning circulation are proper...
Article
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The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) of tropical zonal wind is one of the most important modes of interannual variability in the stratosphere. It is well established that the QBO influences the distribution of trace gases throughout the global stratosphere. What has not been clearly shown thus far is whether the stratospheric QBO has a consistent a...
Article
Full-text available
Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) can affect cloud properties and therefore Earth’s radiative balance1,2,3. New particle formation (NPF) from condensable vapours in the free troposphere has been suggested to contribute to CCN, especially in remote, pristine atmospheric regions⁴, but direct evidence is sparse, and the magnitude of this contribution is...
Article
Full-text available
The spatial distribution and properties of submicron organic aerosols (OA) are among the key sources of uncertainty in our understanding of aerosol effects on climate. Uncertainties are particularly large over remote regions of the free troposphere and Southern Ocean, where very little data has been available, and where OA predictions from AeroCom...
Article
Full-text available
We present the first data on the concentration of sea-salt aerosol throughout most of the depth of the troposphere and over a wide range of latitudes, which were obtained during the Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) mission. Sea-salt concentrations in the upper troposphere are very small, usually less than 10 ng per standard m³ (about 10 parts per tril...
Article
Full-text available
Plain Language Summary Convective systems dominate the vertical transport of aerosols and trace gases. The most recent global aerosol measurements show that the concentrations of primary aerosols including sea salt and black carbon drop by a factor of 10–10,000 from the surface to the upper troposphere. In this study, we show that a climate model o...
Article
Full-text available
The Montreal Protocol was designed to protect the stratospheric ozone layer by enabling reductions in the abundance of ozone-depleting substances such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the atmosphere. The reduction in the atmospheric concentration of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) has made the second-largest contribution to the decline in the total...
Article
Full-text available
Ozone forms in the Earth's atmosphere from the photodissociation of molecular oxygen, primarily in the tropical stratosphere. It is then transported to the extratropics by the Brewer–Dobson circulation (BDC), forming a protective ozone layer around the globe. Human emissions of halogen-containing ozone-depleting substances (hODSs) led to a decline...
Article
Full-text available
Stratospheric aerosols (SAs) are a variable component of the Earth's albedo that may be intentionally enhanced in the future to offset greenhouse gases (geoengineering). The role of tropospheric-sourced sulfur dioxide (SO2) in maintaining background SAs has been debated for decades without in-situ measurements of SO2 at the tropical tropopause to i...
Article
Understanding the formation of tropospheric ozone (O3) and secondary particulates is essential for controlling secondary pollution in megacities. Intensive observations were conducted to investigate the evolution of O3, nitrate, sulfate and oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, a proxy for secondary organic aerosols) and the interactions between O3, NOx...
Article
Full-text available
Stratospheric aerosols cool the Earth by scattering sunlight. Although sulfuric acid dominates the stratospheric aerosol, this study finds that organic material in the lowermost stratosphere contributes 30-40% of the non-volcanic stratospheric aerosol optical depth (sAOD). Simulations indicate that non-volcanic sAOD has increased 77% since 1850. St...
Article
Full-text available
The Rim Fire of 2013, the third largest area burned by fire recorded in California history, is simulated by a climate model coupled with a size-resolved aerosol model. Modeled aerosol mass, number and particle size distribution are within variability of data obtained from multiple airborne in-situ measurements. Simulations suggest Rim Fire smoke ma...
Article
Full-text available
Globally, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is mostly formed from emissions of bio- genic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by vegetation, but can be modified by human activities as demonstrated in recent research. Specifically, nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) have been shown to play a critical role in the chemical formation of low volatility compou...
Thesis
Full-text available
A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties and interactions with clouds are simulated. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particle...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies revealed layers of enhanced aerosol scattering in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over Asia (Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL)) and North America (North American Tropospheric Aerosol Layer (NATAL)). We use a sectional aerosol model (Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA)) coupled with the Commu...
Article
Full-text available
Recent observations reveal a seasonally occurring layer of aerosol located from 0° to 100°E, 20° to 45°N and extending vertically from about 13 km to 18 km; this has been termed the Asian tropopause aerosol layer (ATAL), and its existence is closely associated with the Asian summer monsoon circulation. Observational studies argue that the ATAL is a...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Stratospheric composition (aerosol, ozone, water vapor) Tibetan Atmospheric chemistry