Penelope Margaret Sanderson

Penelope Margaret Sanderson
The University of Queensland | UQ · School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering

PhD

About

323
Publications
37,913
Reads
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5,866
Citations
Citations since 2016
84 Research Items
2113 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
20162017201820192020202120220100200300
Additional affiliations
January 2002 - present
The University of Queensland
Position
  • Professor (Full)
January 1997 - November 2001
Swinburne University of Technology
Position
  • Professor (Full)
January 1989 - December 2007
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (323)
Article
Full-text available
Background We tested principles that could lead to a future cognitive aid that offers an interpretation of the newborn’s physiological state during resuscitation after birth. Using concordance among experts’ interpretations of newborn vital sign patterns as an approximation for an algorithm that could provide an interpretation of the newborn’s stat...
Article
Objective Auditory enhancements to the pulse oximetry tone may help clinicians detect deviations from target ranges for oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and heart rate (HR). Background Clinical guidelines recommend target ranges for SpO 2 and HR during neonatal resuscitation in the first 10 minutes after birth. The pulse oximeter currently maps HR to to...
Article
Objective A study of auditory displays for simulated patient monitoring compared the effectiveness of two sound categories (alarm sounds indicating general risk categories from international alarm standard IEC 60601-1-8 versus event-specific sounds according to the type of nursing unit) and two configurations (single-patient alarms versus multi-pat...
Article
In previous work, an auditory vital sign display of five patients was developed. Sounds denoting the vital signs of each patient were delivered in order, with a special sound for any patient whose vital signs were all normal. Although the display was effective, accuracy decreased as the number of abnormal patients increased. We wondered whether acc...
Article
Objective In two experiments, we examined how quickly different visual alerts on a head-worn display (HWD) would capture participants’ attention to a matrix of patient vital sign values, while multitasking. Background An HWD could help clinicians monitor multiple patients, regardless of where the clinician is located. We sought effective ways for...
Article
Objectives To (1) develop a simulation software environment to conduct prehospital research during the COVID-19 pandemic on paramedics’ teamwork and use of mobile computing devices, and (2) establish its feasibility for use as a research and training tool. Background Simulation-based research and training for prehospital environments has typically...
Article
Manufacturers could improve the pulse tones emitted by pulse oximeters to support more accurate identification of a patient's peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) range. In this article, we outline the strengths and limitations of the variable-pitch tone that represents SpO2 of each detected pulse, and we argue that enhancements to the tone to demar...
Article
Background Neonatal resuscitation teams face unique challenges in the delivery of patient care. Our purpose was (a) to understand team challenges and then (b) to improve the work system. Methods The user-centred design process involved multiple iterations of requirements gathering, prototype design, evaluation, and redesign. Methods included (1) f...
Article
A fieldwork study conducted in six units of a major metropolitan Australian hospital revealed that nurses’ attitudes towards alarms are influenced by each unit’s physical layout and caseload. Additionally, nurses relied heavily on both non-actionable and actionable alarms to maintain their awareness of the status of their patients’ wellbeing, and u...
Article
Modern computerised medical devices emit large numbers of tone-based alerts and alarms. Notifications that comprise auditory icons or natural human speech substantially increase the psychological salience of alerts and alarms and may allow a larger set of notifications to be used, as they do not require memorisation of arbitrary sounds.
Article
Head-Worn Displays (HWD) can potentially support the mobile work of emergency responders, but it remains unclear whether teamwork is affected when emergency responders use HWDs. We reviewed studies that examined HWDs in emergency response contexts to evaluate the impact of HWDs on team performance and on team processes of situation awareness, commu...
Article
Healthcare workers often monitor patients while moving between different locations and tasks, and away from conventional monitoring displays. Vibrotactile displays can provide patient information in vibrotactile patterns that are felt regardless of the worker's location. We examined how effectively participants could identify changes in vibrotactil...
Article
Full-text available
Objective To gain a deeper understanding of the information requirements of clinicians conducting neonatal resuscitation in the first 10 min after birth.Background During the resuscitation of a newborn infant in the first minutes after birth, clinicians must monitor crucial physiological adjustments that are relatively unobservable, unpredictable,...
Article
Many physiological aspects of the neonatal transition after birth are unobservable because relevant sensors do not yet exist, compromising clinicians’ understanding of a neonate’s physiological status. Given that a neonate’s true physiological state is currently unavailable, we explored the feasibility of using clinicians’ degree of concordance as...
Chapter
When testing medical interventions in a simulator, establishing an environment that allows findings to generalize to clinical settings; designing scenarios that are representative of clinical situations and that can be delivered consistently; and ensuring correct operation of simulator systems to ensure efficient data collection, can be challenging...
Article
Head-worn displays (HWDs) have been studied extensively in healthcare and industrial contexts over the past years. In this survey paper, we analyse the use of HWDs that do not occlude the view of the environment in those two domains. In addition, we explore researchers' approaches to the design of HWD applications. Across four databases we found 35...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Continuous monitoring of patient vital signs may improve patient outcomes. Head-worn displays can provide hands-free access to continuous patient vital sign information in critical and acute care contexts and thus may reduce instances of unrecognised patient deterioration. OBJECTIVE To conduct a systematic review of the literature to ev...
Article
Full-text available
Background Continuous monitoring of patient vital signs may improve patient outcomes. Head-worn displays (HWDs) can provide hands-free access to continuous vital sign information of patients in critical and acute care contexts and thus may reduce instances of unrecognized patient deterioration. Objective The purpose of the study is to conduct a sy...
Article
Head-worn displays (HWDs) have shown promise for supporting workers in a range of contexts due to their ability to provide live ‘heads up and hands free’ information. However, in many work environments co-located workers may need to collaborate and communicate about the tasks that they are engaged with, and this may be difficult when information is...
Article
Head Worn Displays (HWDs) are increasingly used to support mobile workers across diverse domains. However, little is known about how HWDs affect teamwork in safety-critical contexts. We conducted a narrative review examining the effects of HWDs on teamwork performance and team processes of situation awareness, communication, and coordination for em...
Article
Auditory alarms in hospitals are ambiguous and do not provide enough information to support doctors and nurses' awareness of patient events. A potential alternative is the use of short segments of time-compressed speech, or spearcons. However, sometimes it might be desirable for patients to understand spearcons and sometimes not. We used reverse hi...
Article
Background We compared anaesthetists' ability to identify haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels using two auditory displays: one based on a standard pulse oximeter display (varying pitch plus alarm) and the other enhanced with additional sound properties (varying pitch plus tremolo and acoustic brightness) to differentiate SpO2 ranges. Metho...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Supervising anesthesiologists overseeing several operating rooms must be aware of the status of multiple patients, so they can consult with the anesthetist in single operating rooms or respond quickly to critical events. However, maintaining good situation awareness can be challenging when away from patient bedsides or a central monitoring...
Article
In this paper we describe the risks of complex applied research, especially in work domains where professional practitioners are scarce. For such research, careful preparation and piloting is needed, especially when estimating sample size is required for a full study. However, such pilot work may reduce the potential sample size for the full study....
Conference Paper
Much of the focus related to alarm fatigue has been directed towards reducing the number of alarms associated with vital sign monitoring. However, recent fieldwork conducted in four high dependency and critical care units of an Australian hospital suggests that the most problematic alarms were often unassociated with vital signs, such as IV pumps a...
Article
Full-text available
This session looks to serve the purpose of recalling and recounting the life and contributions of Professor John Senders. The contributors to this session include his direct colleagues, his students, his co-authors, those whom he inspired, and even members of his family. These designations are not exclusive! Senders made so many contributions acros...
Conference Paper
Spearcons (time-compressed speech) may be a viable display for patient monitoring, but the impact of concurrent linguistic tasks on spearcons has not been examined. We tested whether different concurrent linguistic tasks worsen participants’ identification of spearcons. Experiment 1 tested participants’ identification of spearcons representing 2 vi...
Article
Clinicians are not always at their patients’ bedsides and may therefore need ways of remotely monitoring the well-being of multiple patients under their care. We outline the main findings of a research program investigating whether the intermittent presentation of short phrases of time-compressed speech (spearcons) is an effective way of giving mob...
Article
Head-worn displays (HWDs) can help clinicians monitor multiple patients by displaying multiple patients’ vital signs. We conducted four experiments exploring design features that affect how a HWD can quickly and reliably cue attention to patient deterioration. In a series of lab-based experiments, we found that a HWD could quickly and reliably cue...
Article
Objective We address the problem of how researchers investigate the actual or potential causal connection between interruptions and medical errors, and whether interventions might reduce the potential for harm. Background It is widely assumed that interruptions lead to errors and patient harm. However, many reviewers and authors have commented tha...
Article
Spearcons (time-compressed speech) may be a viable auditory display for patient monitoring; however, the impact of concurrent linguistic tasks remains unexamined. We tested whether different concurrent linguistic tasks worsen participants' identification of spearcons. Experiment 1 tested non-clinician participants' identification of multiple-patien...
Article
Currently, the majority of medical devices are designed for adults; some are then miniaturized for use in neonates. This process neglects population-specific testing that would ensure that the medical devices used for neonates are actually safe and effective for that group. Incorporating human-centered design principles and utilizing methods to eva...
Article
We performed a randomised controlled trial comparing two kinds of earcons that could provide intermittent pulse oximetry information about a patient's oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR). Timbre-earcons represented SpO2 levels with different levels of timbre, and pitch-earcons with different levels of pitch. Both kinds of earcons represent...
Article
Background: When engaged in visually demanding tasks, anesthesiologists depend on the auditory display of the pulse oximeter (PO) to provide information about patients' oxygen saturation (SpO2). Current auditory displays are not always effective at providing SpO2 information. In this laboratory study, clinician and nonclinician participants identi...
Article
Background: The pulse oximeter (PO) provides anesthesiologists with continuous visual and auditory information about a patient's oxygen saturation (SpO2). However, anesthesiologists' attention is often diverted from visual displays, and clinicians may inaccurately judge SpO2 values when relying on conventional PO auditory tones. We tested whether...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
During surgery the pulse oximeter device provides information about a patient’s oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate via visual and auditory displays. An audible tone is emitted after every detected pulse (indicating heart rate), and the pitch of the tone is mapped to SpO2. However, clinicians cannot reliably judge SpO2 using only the current au...
Article
Spearcons-time-compressed speech phrases-may be an effective way of communicating vital signs to clinicians without disturbing patients and their families. Four experiments tested the effectiveness of spearcons for conveying oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and heart rate (HR) of one or more patients. Experiment 1 demonstrated that spearcons were more ef...
Article
In hospitals, clinicians often need to monitor several patients while performing other tasks. However, visual displays that show patients' vital signs are in fixed locations and auditory alarms intended to alert clinicians may be missed. Information such as spearcons (time-compressed speech earcons) that ‘travels’ with the clinician and is delivere...
Article
Objective:: To investigate whether head-worn displays (HWDs) help mobile participants make better alarm management decisions and achieve better situation awareness than alarms alone. Background:: Patient alarms occur frequently in hospitals but often do not require clinical intervention. Clinicians may become desensitized to alarms and fail to r...
Article
Objective: To compare people's ability to detect peripherally presented stimuli on a monocular head-worn display (HWD) versus a conventional screen. Background: Visual attention capture has been systematically investigated, but not with respect to HWDs. How stimulus properties affect attention capture is likely to be different on an HWD when com...
Article
Objective: We tested whether enhanced sonifications would improve participants' ability to judge the oxygen saturation levels (SpO2) of simulated neonates in the first 10 min after birth. Background: During the resuscitation of a newborn infant, clinicians must keep the neonate's SpO2 levels within the target range, however the boundaries for th...
Article
Objective: The aim was to compare the effectiveness of two auditory displays, implemented with spearcons (time-compressed speech), for monitoring multiple patients. Background: Sequences of sounds can convey information about patients' vital signs, such as oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR). We tested whether participants could monitor...
Article
Objectives: Interruptions occur frequently in the intensive care unit (ICU) and are associated with errors. To date, no causal connection has been established between interruptions and errors in healthcare. It is important to know whether interruptions directly cause errors before implementing interventions designed to reduce interruptions in ICUs...
Article
Background: Anaesthetists monitor auditory information about a patient's vital signs in an environment that can be noisy and while performing other cognitively demanding tasks. It can be difficult to identify oxygen saturation (SpO2) values using existing pulse oximeter auditory displays (sonifications). Methods: In a laboratory setting, we comp...
Article
Examinations of interruptions in healthcare often focus on a single clinical discipline, and solutions are targeted accordingly. This approach does not take into account the inter-disciplinary dependencies and other sociotechnical aspects that make up the healthcare work system, and suggested solutions may not meet the needs of all stakeholders. In...
Article
Objective We compared the effectiveness of single-tone earcons versus spearcons in conveying information about two commonly monitored vital signs: oxygen saturation and heart rate. Background The uninformative nature of many medical alarms-and clinicians' lack of response to alarms-is a widespread problem that can compromise patient safety. Auditor...
Article
Visual cues relating to an interrupted task can help people recover from workplace interruptions. However, it is unclear whether visual cues relating to their next steps in a primary task may help people manage interruptions. In a previous intensive care unit simulation study, Grundgeiger et al. (2013) found that nurses performing equipment checks...
Article
Interruptions are widely considered a problem in healthcare. Results from observation and experimental studies have guided extensive mitigation efforts, but the effectiveness of interventions remains mixed. We have built on current theories and methods for studying interruptions to develop a novel observational approach – the Dual Perspectives Meth...
Article
Objective: The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) provides recommendations on neonatal resuscitation training and practice, which includes a template for a decision-making algorithm. We evaluated the design properties of the ILCOR algorithm and four adaptations by member resuscitation organizations using the validated Cogniti...
Article
Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether a sequence of earcons can effectively convey the status of multiple processes, such as the status of multiple patients in a clinical setting. Background: Clinicians often monitor multiple patients. An auditory display that intermittently conveys the status of multiple patients may help....
Article
Background: Researchers from diverse theoretical backgrounds have studied workplace interruptions in healthcare, leading to a complex and conflicting body of literature. Understanding pre-existing viewpoints may advance the field more effectively than attempts to remove bias from investigations. Objective: To identify research traditions that ha...
Article
In this special issue, many of the papers focus on Rasmussen's analytic contributions to the understanding of work in complex sociotechnical systems. Work is analysed for the purpose of developing new designs that can improve the nature of that work. The evaluation of such designs was a key part of Rasmussen's program, yet he was often sceptical of...
Article
Recent guidelines recommend oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels of 90%-95% for preterm neonates on supplemental oxygen but it is difficult to discern such levels with current pulse oximetry sonifications. We tested (1) whether adding levels of tremolo to a conventional log-linear pulse oximetry sonification would improve identification of SpO2 ranges,...
Article
Patient alarms occur frequently in hospitals, but they often do not require clinical intervention. As a result, clinicians can become desensitized to alarms and may fail to respond to them, including to alarms that are clinically relevant. Clinicians and researchers have investigated ways to make alarms more informative by adding delays (Gorges, Ma...
Article
In the operating theatre, anesthesiologists monitor an anesthetized patient’s oxygen saturation (SpO2) with a visual display but also with an auditory tone, or sonification. However, if the anesthesiologist must divide their attention across tasks, they may be less effective at recognising their patient’s SpO2 level. Previous research indicates tha...
Article
Field-based simulation research can be delayed or prevented due to restricted resources and other practical challenges. Although laboratory work is a feasible alternative, it is often criticized for a lack of generalizability. We faced this issue when investigating the impact of workplace interruptions on nurses’ work performance in the Intensive C...
Article
Clinicians often monitor the status of multiple patients who are out of the clinician’s field of view. An auditory display that intermittently conveys the vital signs of these patients through an earpiece may help clinicians detect problems with one or more patients. The auditory display could convey the status of multiple patients by representing...
Article
To improve safety, work systems need to be designed that help humans successfully manage expected and unexpected situations. A resilience-based human factors method called strategies analysis for enhancing resilience (SAfER) has been developed to help practitioners identify ways to create systems that let humans more effectively control the range o...