Pelin Gul

Pelin Gul
University of Groningen | RUG · Campus Fryslân

PhD in Social Psychology

About

36
Publications
21,364
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
360
Citations
Citations since 2016
33 Research Items
354 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Introduction
My primary research interests involve understanding the psychological foundations of gender relations. I seek to explain how motivational forces interact with sociocultural and socioecological factors to shape support for ideologies that are disadvantageous to women such as sexism and female honor norms. I approach my research questions with a combination of perspectives from social, cultural, and evolutionary psychology, using experimental and survey methodology.

Publications

Publications (36)
Article
Full-text available
Benevolent sexism (BS) has detrimental effects on women, yet women prefer men with BS attitudes over those without. The predominant explanation for this paradox is that women respond to the superficially positive appearance of BS without being aware of its subtly harmful effects. We propose an alternative explanation drawn from evolutionary and soc...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that there is higher tolerance of violence against women in cultures with salient gender‐specific honor norms, especially when the violence occurs in intimate relationships and in response to threat to male honor. The present cross‐cultural study (N = 398) extended these findings to sexual aggression (i.e., marital rape)...
Article
Full-text available
Anti-effeminacy bias follows a specific pattern with men showing stronger anti-effeminacy bias against male targets than women. Previous explanations focused on men’s higher tendency to stigmatize feminine men as homosexual and motives to maintain a dominant group status. Here, we suggest that certain expressions of anti-effeminacy bias may rather...
Article
Full-text available
A range of studies have sought to understand why people’s compliance with social distancing varied during the COVID-19 pandemic. Recent theory suggests that pathogen avoidance behavior is based not only on perceived risk but on a trade-off between the perceived costs of pathogen exposure and the perceived benefits of social contact. We hypothesized...
Preprint
Full-text available
Since the seminal publication of Nisbett and Cohen in 1996 linking the higher rates of violence in the Southern U.S. compared to the Northern U.S. to a "culture of honor," researchers have paid increasing attention to conceptualizing honor and identifying its underlying psychological mechanisms and its behavioral outcomes. The concern for reputatio...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, involuntary celibates who identify as “Incels” have received considerable public attention because of their misogynistic online discourse and their tie to a string of violent acts motivated by hatred of women. Yet, surprisingly no prior quantitative research has examined whether unwanted celibacy – a subjective psychological experi...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic caused drastic social changes for many people, including separation from friends and coworkers, enforced close contact with family, and reductions in mobility. Here we assess the extent to which people's evolutionarily-relevant basic motivations and goals—fundamental social motives such as Affiliation and Kin Care—might have b...
Article
Full-text available
How does psychology vary across human societies? The fundamental social motives framework adopts an evolutionary approach to capture the broad range of human social goals within a taxonomy of ancestrally recurring threats and opportunities. These motives—self-protection, disease avoidance, affiliation, status, mate acquisition, mate retention, and...
Preprint
Full-text available
People vary in the extent to which they embrace their society’s traditions, impacting a range of social and political phenomena. People also vary in the degree to which they perceive disparate dangers as salient and necessitating a response. Over evolutionary time, traditions likely regularly offered direct and indirect avenues for addressing hazar...
Preprint
In recent years, the involuntary celibates who identify as “Incels” have received considerable public attention because of their misogynistic online discourse and their tie to a string of violent acts against women. Yet, surprisingly no prior quantitative research has examined whether unwanted celibacy – a subjective psychological experience charac...
Article
Full-text available
Although dating violence poses a serious threat to adolescents’ health and well-being around the globe, little evidence is available for Europe in general and Switzerland in particular. Also, evidence on the role of cognitive predictors related to a more general justification of aggressive behavior and gender-based violence is lacking. Therefore, t...
Article
What role does intergroup contact play in promoting support for social change toward greater social equality? Drawing on the needs-based model of reconciliation, we theorized that when inequality between groups is perceived as illegitimate, disadvantaged group members will experience a need for empowerment and advantaged group members a need for ac...
Preprint
Full-text available
Many studies have sought to understand why people’s compliance with social distancing varied during the Covid-19 pandemic. Recent theory suggests that pathogen avoidance behavior is not based only on perceived risk, but on a trade-off between the perceived costs of pathogen exposure and the perceived benefits of social contact. We hypothesized that...
Preprint
Full-text available
In many cultures, women are expected to cultivate a reputation for pure and chaste behavior such as wearing modest clothes and maintaining virginity before marriage. The dominant explanation for people’s support for female honor norms is that female infidelity and promiscuity threatens her male partner’s reputation and masculinity. Beyond this, the...
Article
Full-text available
This study compares the individual-level and sample-level predictive utility of a measure of the cultural logics of dignity, honor, and face. University students in 29 samples from 24 nations used a simple measure to rate their perceptions of the interpersonal cultural logic characterizing their local culture. The nomological net of these measures...
Article
Since the seminal publication of Nisbett and Cohen in 1996 linking the higher rates of violence in the Southern United States compared with the Northern United States to a "culture of honor," researchers have paid increasing attention to conceptualizing honor and identifying its underlying psychological mechanisms and its behavioral outcomes. The c...
Preprint
Anti-effeminacy bias follows a specific pattern with men showing stronger anti-effeminacy bias against male targets than women. Previous explanations focused on men’s higher tendency to perceive feminine men as homosexuals and motives to maintain a dominant group status. Here, we suggest that certain expressions of anti-effeminacy bias may rather b...
Article
Full-text available
Sex differences in aspects of independent versus interdependent self-construal and depressive symptoms were surveyed among 5,320 students from 24 nations. Men were found to perceive themselves as more self-contained whereas women perceived themselves as more connected to others. No significant sex differences were found on two further dimensions of...
Article
Full-text available
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Honor means having a good reputation (e.g., being known as an honest person) and self-respect (e.g., being proud of one's own competence). In honor cultures (e.g., Turkey, Southern U.S.), people are more sensitive to threats to their moral reputation (e.g., being called a liar) than in dignity cultures (e.g., Northern U.S.), and they respond more s...
Article
Full-text available
Guided by the early findings of social scientists, practitioners have long advocated for greater contact between groups to reduce prejudice and increase social cohesion. Recent work, however, suggests that intergroup contact can undermine support for social change towards greater equality, especially among disadvantaged group members. Using a large...
Preprint
Full-text available
What role does intergroup contact play in promoting support for social change toward greater equality? Drawing on the needs-based model of reconciliation, we theorized that when inequality between groups is perceived as illegitimate, disadvantaged groups members will experience a need for empowerment and advantaged groups members a need for accepta...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research in the Middle East and North Africa has revealed justifying attitudes toward wife beating among adults, but little is known about adolescent attitudes and its predictors. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine theoretically relevant predictors of supportive attitudes toward wife beating among adolescents in Jor...
Article
Full-text available
What motives do people prioritize in their social lives? Historically, social psychologists, especially those adopting an evolutionary perspective, have devoted a great deal of research attention to sexual attraction and romantic-partner choice (mate seeking). Research on long-term familial bonds (mate retention and kin care) has been less thorough...
Preprint
Full-text available
What motives do people prioritize in their social lives? Historically, social psychologists, especially those adopting an evolutionary perspective, have devoted a great deal of research attention to sexual attraction and romantic partner choice (mate-seeking). Research on long-term familial bonds (mate retention and kin care) has been less thorough...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the rising number of men and women in counter-stereotypical roles, it is rare for men to serve as primary caregivers in families with dependent children. In two studies, we examined how British men and women perceive and emotionally react to primary caregiver (vs. breadwinner) fathers, whether their perceptions and reactions are contingent...
Article
What motives do people prioritize in their social lives? Historically, social psychologists, especially those adopting an evolutionary perspective, have devoted a great deal of research attention to sexual attraction and romantic-partner choice (mate-seeking). Research on long-term familial bonds (mate retention and kin care) has been less thorough...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Biologists and social scientists have long tried to understand why some societies have more fluid and open interpersonal relationships—differences in relational mobility—and how those differences influence individual behaviors. We measure relational mobility in 39 societies and find that relationships are more stable and hard to form i...
Article
Full-text available
There is a lack of consensus on the conceptualization of mental health, with models emphasizing negative aspects, positive aspects, or both. The models are mainly theory-based and may not fit in with the population’s opinions. The aim of this ongoing study is to investigate the conceptualizations of mental health in Europe from psychology, science,...
Article
Full-text available
To date, the historiography on women in Canadian psychology has been relatively sparse. This is especially true in relation to the much more extensive literature that documents the history of first and second generation women in American psychology. The aim of this paper is to systematically identify and analyse the personal characteristics, educat...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
Hello RG Community,
I need advice about testing moderation and mediation hypotheses with variables measured at different levels. We have data from 18 countries, and I was curious if I can test the following hypotheses.
Mediation hypothesis: Country-level gender equality leads to higher perpetration of violance against women (measured at individual level) through higher opposition to female sexual freedom (indvidual level).
Moderation hypothesis: Higher opposition to female sexual freedom (measured at the indvidual-level) would relate to higher perpetration of violance against women (indvidual level), especially in higher gender progressive countries (country-level).
I would appreciate your advice on this.
Side note: I don't have any experience with multi-level analysis of large cross-cultural data, but I really would like to learn it. Would you be able to suggest me a good paper/book on this? And is it easier to run it in R or MPlus?
Thank you very much in advance for your time and advice.
Best,
Pelin
Question
Hi Everyone,
I am testing a path model in AMOS, and I created an estimand to get all the specific indirect effects in my model. The model I am testing is actually the same as Model 81 in the PROCESS macro.
The indirect effects I obtained from AMOS and PROCESS don't match. I find some indirect effects to be significant in AMOS, but not in PROCESS. Does anyone know why this may be happening?
I would really appreciate your help. Thanks in advance!
Question
Hello, Is it generally true that effect sizes are lower for ecologically valid field experiments compared with controlled lab experiments?
I'm not sure about this and I'm just trying to understand why the effect sizes in my field experiment was much smaller than my experimental self-report study, on the exact same IVs and DVs of course. Do you know anything about this? Some sources on this would help very much.
Many thanks for your help in advance!

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
It seems that many people think that an act/expression is sexist based on the consequences (e.g. if the act/expression imply that genders may differ on some trait), even if the actor does not intent to be undermining to women. However, much research on moral judgments has shown that intent is an important factor in attribution of (im)morality. This project aims to investigate how lay people conceptualize and define sexism, and whether the role of intent is also relevant to judgments of sexism.
Project
This research project examines novel individual-level explanations for the existance and perpetuation of sexism and misogenistic beliefs in society based on the common motives and characteristics of the online communities that self-describe as Incels (involuntary celibates).