Peggy Nelson

Peggy Nelson
University of Minnesota Twin Cities | UMN

About

69
Publications
5,639
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1,100
Citations
Citations since 2017
19 Research Items
474 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080
2017201820192020202120222023020406080

Publications

Publications (69)
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT The University of Minnesota (UMN) has graduate programs that span the areas of Animal Bioacoustics, Psychological and Physiological Acoustics, and Speech Communication. Degrees are offered in Psychology (PhD), Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences (MA in speech-language pathology, AuD, and PhD in speech-language-hearing science...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT One of the most common complaints of patients wearing hearing aids is difficulty hearing speech in noise. Limited information is available on how to program speech in noise programs as fitting formulas are based on quiet environments. In order to understand what settings could optimize programs in background noise, it is i...
Article
Background The COVID-19 pandemic has produced unique challenges for persons with hearing loss. There is a unique concern that adults with hearing loss may be more susceptible to isolation than adults with normal hearing. Purpose This study explored the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the well-being of older adults with and without hearing loss....
Article
Full-text available
Visual and auditory localization abilities are crucial in real-life tasks such as navigation and social interaction. Aging is frequently accompanied by vision and hearing loss, affecting spatial localization. The purpose of the current study is to elucidate the effect of typical aging on spatial localization and to establish a baseline for older in...
Article
Purpose Self-adjustment of hearing aid amplification enables wearers to customize the hearing aid output to match their preferences and could become an important tool for programming direct-to-consumer devices for people with mild-to-moderate hearing loss. One risk is that user-selected settings may provide inadequate audibility. This study assesse...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Social isolation and loneliness are significant risk factors for overall health, especially for older adults with vision or hearing impairment. This study was designed to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions on the social /emotional wellbeing in adults with sensory impairment. Three groups of older a...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Previous efforts to characterize the spectral and temporal properties of calls contained in the vocal repertoires of adult bald and golden eagles, Haliaeetus leucocephalus and Aquila chrysaetos , respectively, led to the generation of a catalog of call types with distinguishing acoustic properties (McGee et al., 2019). Cal...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Recent mandates for social distancing due to the COVID-19 pandemic have had significant effects on the lives of older persons. Social distancing might have unequal effects on the lives of people with hearing impairment and vision impairment, possibly affecting their emotional well-being. We remotely surveyed 55 persons bet...
Article
Full-text available
Collision with wind turbines is a conservation concern for eagles with population abundance implications. The development of acoustic alerting technologies to deter eagles from entering hazardous air spaces is a potentially significant mitigation strategy to diminish associated morbidity and mortality risks. As a prelude to the engineering of deter...
Article
No PDF available ABSTRACT Hearing-related questionnaires can reveal much about the daily experience of hearing aid users. Nonetheless, results may not fully reflect the lived experience for several reasons, including: users’ limited awareness of all communication challenges, limitations of memory, and the subjective nature of reporting. Multiple fa...
Article
Full-text available
Self-adjustment of hearing aid gain can provide valuable information about the gain preferences of individual listeners, but these preferences are not well understood. Listeners with mild-to-moderate hearing loss used self-adjustment to select amplification gain and compression parameters in real time on a portable touch screen device while listeni...
Article
It can be important for clinical researchers to be able to evaluate the performance of sensory aids using both objective and subjective methods. New technology (such as self-fit hearing aids) can be evaluated in a laboratory setting in calibrated listening scenarios that reflect daily listening situations. In the Center for Applied and Translationa...
Article
As part of an initial effort to determine if acoustic signals can be used to discourage eagles from entering wind turbine facility airspaces and thereby reduce morbidity/mortality collision rates, behavioral responses of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) to a battery of both natural and synthetic acoustic stimuli of varying spectral complexiti...
Conference Paper
Hearing-related questionnaires can reveal much about the daily experience of hearing aid users. Nonetheless, results may not fully reflect the lived experience for several reasons, including: users’ limited awareness of all communication challenges, limitations of memory, and the subjective nature of reporting. Multiple factors can influence result...
Article
Full-text available
The current study used the self-fitting algorithm to allow listeners to self-adjust hearing-aid gain or compression parameters to select gain for speech understanding in a variety of quiet and noise conditions. Thirty listeners with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss adjusted gain parameters in quiet and in several types of noise. Outcomes...
Article
Standards are essential for the practice of audiology. Microphones,sound level meters, and all calibration equipment and procedures depend on effective standards. Equipment and methods for assessing hearing function, and for the fitting and evaluation of sensory aids for hearing loss all require the development and refinement of good standards. The...
Article
This study examined how speech babble noise differentially affected the auditory P3 responses and the associated neural oscillatory activities for consonant and vowel discrimination in relation to segmental- and sentence-level speech perception in noise. The data were collected from 16 normal-hearing participants in a double-oddball paradigm that c...
Article
Signal/masker envelope fluctuations have important effects on detection and discrimination. Narrowband Gaussian noise (GN) forward maskers yield higher masked thresholds for detecting pure tones than do low-fluctuation noise (LFN) forward maskers. The increased residual masking is due to inherent fluctuations in the temporal envelope of GN producin...
Article
Forward-masked thresholds increase as the magnitude of inherent masker envelope fluctuations increase for both normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) adults for a short masker-probe delay (25 ms). The slope of the recovery from forward masking is shallower for HI than for NH listeners due to reduced cochlear nonlinearities. However, effects...
Article
Gaussian noise simultaneous maskers yield higher masked thresholds for pure tones than low-fluctuation noise simultaneous maskers for listeners with normal hearing. This increased masking effectiveness is thought to be due to inherent fluctuations in the temporal envelope of Gaussian noise, but effects of fluctuating forward maskers are unknown. Be...
Article
Full-text available
The current study measured neural responses to investigate auditory stream segregation of noise stimuli with or without clear spectral contrast. Sequences of alternating A and B noise bursts were presented to elicit stream segregation in normal-hearing listeners. The successive B bursts in each sequence maintained an equal amount of temporal separa...
Article
Purpose: This preliminary study explored differences between adults with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI) for speech processing accuracy, processing speed and effort in various conditions of interference. Methods: Ten adults with TBI and six adults without TBI participated. Speech processing was studied using sentence repetition in six l...
Article
Savel and Bacon (2003) measured detection thresholds for a 4000 Hz pure-tone signal in the presence of a narrowband noise (NBN) or a low-noise noise (LNN) simultaneous masker. The authors asserted that fluctuations in the envelope of the NBN were likely responsible for its increased masking effectiveness. Because modulation detection interference (...
Article
This project measured whole-word and phoneme recognition in normally hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) participants listening in steady-state noise. Stimuli were modeled after those used in Olsen et al. [EarHear 1997] including 10-word lists of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) monosyllables containing 10 vowels and 20 consonants. Words were pre...
Article
Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often show less masking release (MR) than normal-hearing listeners when temporal fluctuations are imposed on a steady-state masker, even when accounting for overall audibility differences. This difference may be related to a loss of cochlear compression in HI listeners. Behavioral estimates of compression, using temp...
Article
To examine the risk for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in university marching band members and to provide an overview of a hearing conservation program for a marching band. Sound levels during band rehearsals were recorded and audiometric hearing thresholds and transient otoacoustic emission were measured over a 3-year period. Musician's earplug...
Article
Full-text available
To examine the effects of temporal and spectral interference of masking noise on sentence recognition for listeners with cochlear implants (CI) and normal-hearing persons listening to vocoded signals that simulate signals processed through a CI (NH-Sim). NH-Sim and CI listeners participated in the experiments using speech and noise that were proces...
Article
Full-text available
Broadened auditory filters in listeners with hearing loss may result in listeners' increased reliance on temporal envelope cues for understanding speech. Previous data have shown that background noise may affect hearing-impaired (HI) listeners by negatively affecting the temporal envelope cues in speech. The current study investigates additional HI...
Article
Measures of spectral ripple resolution have become widely used psychophysical tools for assessing spectral resolution in cochlear-implant (CI) listeners. The objective of this study was to compare spectral ripple discrimination and detection in the same group of CI listeners. Ripple detection thresholds were measured over a range of ripple frequenc...
Article
PURPOSE: To examine the risk for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in university marching band students and to provide an overview of a hearing conservation program for a marching band. METHOD: Sound levels during band rehearsals were recorded and audiometric hearing thresholds and TEOAEs were measured over a three-year period. Musician's earplugs...
Article
Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) report significant difficulties when listening to speech in the presence of background noise and are highly variable in their tolerance to such noise. In our studies of speech perception, audibility predicts understanding of speech in quiet for most young listeners with SNHL. In background noise, how...
Article
Research has shown that the amplitude and latency of neural responses to passive mismatch negativity (MMN) tasks are affected by noise (Billings et al., 2010). Further studies have revealed that informational masking noise results in decreased P3 amplitude and increased P3 latency, which correlates with decreased discrimination abilities and reacti...
Article
Widened auditory filters in hearing impaired (HI) listeners may force them to rely more on temporal envelope (TE) cues when listening to speech. We propose that reduced masking release in HI listeners may be partially due to the confusion of the TE's of the masker and target. The current study investigates HI listener's comprehension of low- or hig...
Article
Cochlear hearing loss is often associated with a loss of basilar-membrane (BM) compression, which in turn may contribute to degraded processing of suprathreshold stimuli. Behavioral estimates of compression may therefore be useful as long as they are valid over a wide range of levels and frequencies. Additivity of forward masking (AFM) may provide...
Article
The effect of masking release is still the source of numerous active investigations. However, differences in findings are sometimes noted among studies, especially related to potential gate frequency effects. The present study investigated the effect of masking release on listeners using a variety of speech materials . The main goal of this study w...
Article
Full-text available
Spectral ripple discrimination thresholds were measured in 15 cochlear-implant users with broadband (350-5600 Hz) and octave-band noise stimuli. The results were compared with spatial tuning curve (STC) bandwidths previously obtained from the same subjects. Spatial tuning curve bandwidths did not correlate significantly with broadband spectral ripp...
Article
Non?native?accented speech can be less intelligible than native?accented speech [Lang Learning 49, 285?310]. Furthermore, low?pass filtering can reproduce the reduced audibility of high?frequency hearing loss [JSLHR 21, 5?36]. The current study combines these two lines of inquiry using a sentence?repetition task in which monolingual listeners repea...
Article
Listeners with cochlear hearing loss often obtain less benefit, or masking release (MR), than do normal‐hearing listeners when a steady‐state masker is replaced by a temporally fluctuating one, even when overall audibility differences between the two listener groups are taken into account. One possible explanation for the reduced MR seen in these l...
Article
The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of temporal and spectral interferences on sentence recognition for cochlear (CI)implant listeners. Nie and Nelson (2010) investigated vocoded speech perception in amplitude‐modulated band‐pass noises in order to assess young normal‐hearing (NH) listeners’ speech understanding through cochl...
Article
Listeners with hearing loss (HI) have poorer pure?tone glide detection thresholds than normal?hearing (NH) listeners [Nelson et al., ASA Baltimore (2009)]. Many HI listeners also experience reduced masking release for glide detection in gated noise compared to their performance in steady noise. Pure tones, however, are not good representations of f...
Article
Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss show reduced benefit from fluctuating compared to stationary maskers and experience apparent signal-to-noise-ratio loss when compared to listeners with normal hearing. Previously [Nelson et al. ASA Baltimore (2010)] we tested normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners at similar reduced audibility levels...
Article
Full-text available
Jin & Nelson (2006) found that although amplified speech recognition performance of hearing-impaired (HI) listeners was equal to that of normal-hearing (NH) listeners in quiet and in steady noise, nevertheless HI listeners' performance was significantly poorer in modulated noise. As a follow-up, the current study investigated whether three factors,...
Article
Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often show poorer performance on psychoacoustic tasks than do normal-hearing (NH) listeners. Although some such deficits may reflect changes in suprathreshold sound processing, others may be due to stimulus audibility and the elevated absolute thresholds associated with hearing loss. Masking noise can be used to rais...
Article
We investigated the contribution of amplitude modulation (AM) rate and spectral separation to stream segregation of vocoder bandpass noises. Stimulus sequences were repeated pairs of A and B bursts, where bursts were white noise or vocoder bandpass noise carrying sinusoidal AM (100% modulation depth). Bursts differed either in the center frequency...
Article
Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss show reduced benefit from fluctuating compared to stationary maskers. Our hypothesis is that the representation of the signal in the dips is the most important predictor of performance [Jin and Nelson (2006)]. Because the audibility of the signal is the most critical factor, we tested normal-hearing (NH) an...
Article
One problem reported by listeners with hearing impairment (HI) might be that formant transitions in noise are not as salient as for listeners with normal hearing (NH). We hypothesize that a reduced ability to perceive formant transitions in noise could contribute to reduced masking release seen in HI listeners. In this study, we used pure-tone glid...
Article
Vocoded speech perception was investigated in amplitude-modulated bandpass noise to assess normal-hearing listeners' speech understanding through cochlear implant simulations with temporal and spectral interference. Sixteen vocoder bands were applied to IEEE sentences and white noise [Fu and Nogaki (2004)]. The lower 10 bands were maintained for sp...
Article
Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) do not experience masking release for speech in fluctuating noise, as normal-hearing listeners do. One hypothesis suggests dip listening may be difficult because frequency glides, or speech formant transitions, may be difficult to discriminate at low sensation levels when in the presence of fluctuati...
Article
Previous results have shown that listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) obtain about half of the masking release of their normal-hearing (NH) counterparts. When speech is amplified sufficiently, listeners with SNHL may score like NH listeners in quiet and in steady noise, yet may obtain only half of the expected release from gated noise....
Article
For the past ten years, the ASA has been very influential in the improvement of classroom acoustics, especially with the adoption of ANSI S12.60-2002. In fact, we have been a part of a worldwide effort to improve the learning environments for children, thanks in large part to the efforts of Nixon. Even after the adoption of the standard, we must st...
Article
Fluctuating background noise is a significant problem for listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Data indicate that fluctuating noise significantly affects both speech understanding and satisfaction with hearing aids. Listeners with SNHL do not take advantage of momentary dips in the noise and thus to not experience release from masking...
Article
Preschool children must learn in noisy environments (Picard and Bradley, 2001), but young children are more negatively affected by background noise than are adults (Elliott, 1979). Young second‐language learners are more negatively affected by noise than are monolingual children (Crandell et al., 1996; Nelson et al., 2005). Background noise may be...
Article
Previous investigations have suggested that hearing-impaired (HI) listeners have reduced masking release (MR) compared to normal hearing listeners (NH) when they listen in modulated noise. The current study examined the following questions that have not been clearly answered: First, when HI listeners are amplified so that their performance is equal...
Article
This study examined the effect of noise on the identification of four synthetic speech continua (/ra/-/la/, /wa/-/ja/, /i/-/u/, and say-stay) by adults with cochlea implants (CIs) and adults with normal-hearing (NH) sensitivity in quiet and noise. Significant group-by-SNR interactions were found for endpoint identification accuracy for all continua...
Article
Full-text available
Two studies were conducted to investigate the effects of classroom noise on attention and speech perception in native Spanish-speaking second graders learning English as their second language (L2) as compared to English-only-speaking (EO) peers. Study 1 measured children's on-task behavior during instructional activities with and without soundfield...
Article
The presence of background noise affects children more negatively than adults. Understanding speech in noise is a skill that continues to develop well into a child's adolescent years. Childrens' experience with a specific language also may affect their ability to make sense of incoming speech. Research suggests that even for adults the presence of...
Article
Full-text available
Previous work [Nelson, Jin, Carney, and Nelson (2003), J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 113, 961-968] suggested that cochlear implant users do not benefit from masking release when listening in modulated noise. The previous findings indicated that implant users experience little to no release from masking when identifying sentences in speech-shaped noise, regar...
Article
The current investigation examined differences between hearing impaired (HI) listeners and normal‐hearing listeners (NH) in the amount of masking release (MR) for sentence recognition and syllable identification tasks when they listened in modulated noise. HI and NH listeners’ performance was compared when the performance levels of the two groups w...
Article
Recent research has demonstrated that the ability of adults with cochlear implants (CI) to perceive speech in noise is highly variable. There are many potential reasons why this may be so, including poor signal/noise segregation, and poor perception of phonetic features in noise. We examined the CI listeners' perception of four synthetic speech con...
Article
Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often report difficulty understanding speech in the presence of background noise, even in the presence of mild degrees of hearing loss. In addition, HI listeners show significantly less benefit from fluctuations in noise than do normal hearing (NH) listeners. Furthermore, HI listeners often show less accuracy of proc...
Article
Full-text available
Many competing noises in real environments are modulated or fluctuating in level. Listeners with normal hearing are able to take advantage of temporal gaps in fluctuating maskers. Listeners with sensorineural hearing loss show less benefit from modulated maskers. Cochlear implant users may be more adversely affected by modulated maskers because of...
Article
Our previous data [Nelson et al., ASA (2001)] indicated that users of cochlear implants experience little release from masking when listening to speech in modulated maskers. Although normal-hearing listeners take advantage of temporal dips in modulated maskers, cochlear implant users do not. The current study investigated listeners with normal hear...
Article
Listeners with normal hearing sensitivity are able to take advantage of temporal dips in fluctuating noise. Their word identification in gated noise is better than identification in continuous noise. The limits of this ability are not well understood. Young adult listeners with normal hearing sensitivity were tested for their understanding of speec...
Article
Previous research [Munson and Nelson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2360 (2003)] found that adults with cochlear implants (CIs) perceive synthetic /ra/-/la/, /wa/-/ja/, and say-stay continua less accurately and less categorically than listeners with normal-hearing sensitivity (NH) in noise. Considerable variability was found among the CI listeners: some...
Article
Full-text available
Amplitude compression processing is used to reduce amplitude‐level variations of speech to fit reduced dynamic ranges of hard‐of‐hearing (HoH) listeners. However, compression processing results in spectral smearing due in part to reduced peak‐to‐valley ratios. HoH listeners have difficulty detecting important spectral peaks in speech [Nelson and Re...

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