Pedro Monterroso

Pedro Monterroso
University of Porto | UP · Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos (CIBIO)

PhD

About

57
Publications
22,608
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1,200
Citations
Citations since 2016
41 Research Items
1050 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250

Publications

Publications (57)
Article
Full-text available
Deserts are typically governed by bottom-up forces and are predicted to be further depleted of their resources, exacerbating extinction risk for local wildlife populations. Additionally, human populations living in these ecosystems are predicted to increase, exposing wildlife to additional human-induced top-down constraints and intensifying human-w...
Chapter
Wildlife trapping and handling entails multi-level consequences on captured individuals. These impacts may be expressed at the physiological and behavioural levels, starting at capture and potentially waning post-release over a variable period. We investigated the impact of trapping and handling on the physiological parameters of 6 species of south...
Article
Full-text available
Genomic tools have greatly enhanced our ability to uncover ancient interspecific gene flow, including cases involving allopatric lineages and/or lineages that have gone extinct. Recently, a genomic analysis revealed the unexpected gene flow between the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) and the dhole (Cuon alpinus). The two species have currently hig...
Article
Hybridisation between domestic and wild taxa can pose severe threats to wildlife conservation, and human induced hybridisation, often linked to species' introductions and habitat degradation, may promote reproductive opportunities between species for which natural interbreeding would be highly unlikely. Using a biome specific approach, we examine t...
Article
Full-text available
The activity level is a fundamental metric of animal behavior, related to the avoidance of predators, food acquisition, and thermoregulation. Animals need to weigh their activity budget to fulfill their energetic, social and reproductive requirements over the energetic costs of these activities. This task becomes further challenging for prey specie...
Article
Full-text available
The conservation of animal populations often requires the estimation of population size. Low density and secretive behaviour usually determine scarce data sources and hampers precise abundance estimations of carnivore populations. However, joint analysis of independent scarce data sources in a common modeling framework allows unbiased and precise e...
Presentation
Wildlife trapping and handling entail multi-level consequences on captured individuals. These impacts may be expressed at the physiological and behavioural levels, starting at capture and potentially waning post-release over a variable period. We investigated the impact of trapping and handling on the physiological parameters of 6 species of southw...
Article
Many rangelands worldwide are threatened by human population growth, so there is an urgent need for understanding how we can preserve functional diversity across these systems. The conservation and restoration of mammalian carnivores (order Carnivora) is critical because they impart important trophic cascading effects. Land use practice on rangelan...
Article
Full-text available
Humans have transformed most landscapes across the globe, forcing other species to adapt in order to persist in increasingly anthropogenic landscapes. Wide-ranging solitary species, such as wild felids, struggle particularly in such landscapes. Conservation planning and management for their long-term persistence critically depends on understanding...
Article
Population density data on depleted and endangered wildlife species are essential to assure their effective management and, ultimately, conservation. The European wildcat is an elusive and threatened species inhabiting the Iberian Peninsula, with fragmented populations and living in low densities. We fitted spatial capture–recapture models on camer...
Article
Full-text available
Knowledge on interference competition between species, particularly for scarce crucial resources, such as water, is a topic of increasing relevance for wildlife management given climate change scenarios. This study focuses on two sympatric canids, the African wolf and the side-striped jackal, to evaluate their group size and spatiotemporal activity...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract The physiological significance of biometric body condition indices (bBCI) is poorly understood. We hypothesized that bBCI are composite metrics of nutritional physiology, physical fitness and health. To test this hypothesis, we first compared the performance of eight bBCI, using 434 Southern European carnivores from six species as a model...
Article
Competition is a widespread interaction among carnivores, ultimately manifested through one or more dimensions of the species' ecological niche. One of the most explicit manifestations of competitive interactions regards spatial displacement. Its interpretation under a theoretical context provides an important tool to deepen our understanding of bi...
Article
Full-text available
Hybridisation between wild taxa and their domestic congeners is a significant conservation issue. Domestic species frequently outnumber their wild relatives in population size and distribution and may therefore genetically swamp the native species. The European wildcat (Felis silvestris) has been shown to hybridise with domestic cats (Felis catus)....
Article
The civil unrest that ravaged Angola for nearly 30 years took a heavy toll on the country's wildlife, and led to a lengthy absence of reliable information for many threatened species, including the cheetah Acinonyx jubatus and African wild dog Lycaon pictus . Using camera trapping we assessed the status of these two species in two areas of southern...
Poster
Full-text available
La distribución de especies se ve afectada en todo el mundo por los cambios inducidos por el hombre a escalas de tiempo reducidas, particularmente asociadas con los cambios en el uso del suelo. A partir de estas consideraciones y con la información obtenida en el I Sondeo Ibérico de Tejoneras, se procedió a identificar los principales usos del suel...
Article
Full-text available
Human-Induced Rapid Environmental Change (HIREC), particularly climate change and habitat conversion, affects species distributions worldwide. Here, we aimed to (i) assess the factors that determine range patterns of European badger (Meles meles) at the southwestern edge of their distribution and (ii) forecast the possible impacts of future climate...
Chapter
Full-text available
Scientific investigations on the mammals of Angola started over 150 years ago, but information remains scarce and scattered, with only one recent published account. Here we provide a synthesis of the mammals of Angola based on a thorough survey of primary and grey literature, as well as recent unpublished records. We present a short history of mamm...
Article
Full-text available
• Accurate analyses of the diets of predators are key to understand trophic interactions and defining conservation strategies. Diets are commonly assessed through analysis of non‐invasively collected scats, and the use of faecal DNA (fDNA) analysis can reduce the species misidentifications that could lead to biased ecological inference. • We review...
Article
Context. Camera trapping is commonly employed for studying carnivores because it provides better data than do other methods, and with lower costs. Increasing the probability of detecting the target species can reduce parameter uncertainty and survey effort required to estimate density and occurrence. Different methods, including attractants and bai...
Article
Full-text available
European badgers (Meles meles) are considered central-place foragers, whose spatial ecology is predominantly determined by sett location. Many studies have assessed the factors determining sett site selection throughout this species’ range, but these have often been geographically limited and have primarily identified locally dependent factors. To...
Article
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The interactions between animals and their environment vary across species, regions , but also with gender. Sex-specific relations between individuals and the ecosystem may entail different behavioral choices and be expressed through different patterns of habitat use. Regardless, only rarely sex-specific traits are addressed in ecological modeling...
Article
As the detection of the first outbreak of a novel aetiological agent of rabbit haemorrhagic disease commonly called RHDV2 or RHDVb (Lagovirus europaeus/GI.2, henceforth GI.2) in France in 2010, the virus rapidly spread throughout continental Europe and nearby islands such as Great Britain, Sardinia, Sicily, the Azores and the Canary Islands among o...
Article
Rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) is a viral disease that affects the European rabbit. RHD was detected in 1984 in China and rapidly disseminated worldwide causing a severe decline in wild rabbit populations. The aetiological agent, rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), is an RNA virus of the family Caliciviridae, genus Lagovirus. Pathogenic (G...
Conference Paper
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Las interacciones entre los animales y su ambiente varían según las especies y regiones, pero también con el sexo. Las diferencias sexuales en estas relaciones pueden afectar a numerosos parámetros poblacionales y expresarse a través de los patrones de uso del hábitat. A pesar de ello, estas diferencias sexuales raramente se abordan en los enfoques...
Article
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Lagoviruses belong to the Caliciviridae family. They were first recognized as highly pathogenic viruses of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and European brown hare (Lepus europaeus) that emerged in the 1970-1980s, namely, rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) and European brown hare syndrome virus (EBHSV), according to the host specie...
Article
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Emergent diseases may alter the structure and functioning of ecosystems by creating new biotic interactions and modifying existing ones, producing cascading processes along trophic webs. Recently, a new variant of the rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV2 or RHDVb) arguably caused widespread declines in a keystone prey in Mediterranean ecosystem...
Chapter
Full-text available
Las comunidades de carnívoros de la Península Ibérica están habitualmente constituidas por especies de tamaño medio (“mesocarnívoros”), que tienen generalmente requerimientos ecológicos próximos. La finalidad del estudio fue evaluar los factores ecológicos (segregación trófica, espacial y temporal) que permiten la coexistencia de estas especies en...
Article
Carnivores are elusive, nocturnal and scarce, hence, their detection is difficult. Camera trapping has become a powerful non-invasive technique for collecting information on such elusive species. Some of its major applications are species inventories and community monitoring. Some efforts have been recently devoted to standardize protocols for moni...
Article
The structure of mesopredators’ communities is complex and results from a multidimensional web of interactions such as top-down and bottom-up regulation or intraguild interactions. However, these interactions may change geographically along species’ distribution ranges. The pine marten (Martes martes) and stone marten (Martes foina) are 2 similar-s...
Article
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This article is a comprehensive summary of the PhD presented by Pedro Monterroso at the University of Oporto, Portugal, on december 17th, 2013, under the supervision of Dr. Paulo C. Alves and Dr. Pablo Ferreras. The thesis was awarded by the Spanish Society of Mammalogist (SECEM) in 2014, as the best thesis about iberian mammals. DOI: 10.7325/Galem...
Article
Full-text available
Limiting similarity theory predicts that competing species must segregate along one or more dimensions of their ecological niche in order to coexist. In predator communities, interspecific interactions are influenced by a diversity of factors; therefore, the behavioural patterns of composing species will differ due to locally adapted interactions....
Article
Full-text available
Mammalian carnivore communities affect entire ecosystem functioning and structure. However, their large spatial requirements, preferred habitats, low densities, and elusive behavior deem them difficult to study. In recent years, noninvasive techniques have become much more common as they can be used to monitor multiple carnivore species across larg...
Article
The activity patterns exhibited by animals are shaped by evolution, but additionally fine‐tuned by flexible responses to the environment. Predation risk and resource availability are environmental cues which influence the behavioural decisions that make both predators and prey engage in activity bursts, and depending on their local importance, can...
Article
Full-text available
Most studies dealing with home ranges consider the study areas as if they were totally flat, working only in two dimensions, when in reality they are irregular surfaces displayed in three dimensions. By disregarding the third dimension (i.e., topography), the size of home ranges underestimates the surface actually occupied by the animal, potentiall...
Article
Research on terrestrial carnivore ecology frequently relies on scat identification and analysis. However, species assignment is commonly based on scat morphology. Potential errors in scat identification are rarely accounted for and might contribute to substantial bias of the final results. Using molecular methods, we evaluate the accuracy of specie...
Article
Full-text available
Context: The estimation of population parameters for mammalian carnivore species is a challenging task because of their low densities and large home ranges, which make detection probabilities very low. Several factors, such as the species abundance, habitat structure or the use of an attractant affect carnivore detection probabilities; however, att...
Article
Despite some populations of European wildcat Felis silvestris in central Europe are stable or increasing, the Iberian subpopulation is in decline and is listed as ‘vulnerable’. In Portugal, little is known about wildcat populations, making conservation policies extremely difficult to define. Furthermore, the secretive behaviour of these mammals, al...
Article
Full-text available
A survey of the Iberian lynx was conducted in Portugal between January 2002 and November 2003 in order to define lynx status and distribution baselines. Intensive search for lynx scats, scat DNA analysis, and camera trapping were used in areas of potential lynx presence. Over 4,200km were investigated during a global searching effort of 1,975 man-h...
Chapter
Full-text available
From the first half of the 20th century onwards, the Portuguese Iberian lynx population was distributed in three major nuclei: Sado Valley, Malcata and Contenda-Barrancos. In the following decades these areas were subjected to a process that culminated in the specie’s considerable regression, probably as consequence of a major allocation of potenti...
Article
Full-text available
A team of biologists and field assistants conducted, between January 2002 and May 2003, a survey on the status of the Iberian lynx in Portugal. The survey was performed on previously identified lynx areas, during studies carried out in the 1970-s and 1990-s Intensive search for lynx scats, for DNA analysis, and camera trapping provided a basis for...
Article
Full-text available
Ateam of biologists and field assistants conducted, between January 2002 and May 2003, a survey on the status of the Iberian lynx in Portugal. The survey was performed on previously identified lynx areas, during studies carried out in the 1970-s and 1990-s Intensive search for lynx scats, for DNAanalysis, and camera trapping provided a basis for id...
Article
Full-text available
RESUMO O presente artigo discute a aplicação de métodos de interpolação zonal à alteração de suporte espacial de estatísticas socio-económicas. O caso de estudo apresentado consiste na produção de modelos da distribuição espacial da população residente no território continental português, utilizando um zonamento regular com 1x1km 2 .

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
This project aims to quantify the degree of individual trophic specialization in several species of generalist carnivores, to assess the factors determining its incidence in different populations and to draw its ecological consequences and the management and conservation implications. The main hypothesis of the project is that populations of carnivores traditionally considered as generalist are composed of individuals with varying degrees of individual trophic specialization, depending on intrinsic and environmental factors.
Project
This project aims to expand the research and innovation potential of CIBIO – Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources, through the creation of an ERA Chair in Tropical Biodiversity and Ecosystems Research (TROPIBIO). Taking advantage of historical and cultural links, the project is rooted on the network of TwinLabs established between CIBIO and institutions from Portuguese-speaking African countries, aiming to support research in biodiversity assessment, conservation and sustainable use, and ecosystem function and services, thereby contributing to achieve the Life on Land goal of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The project builds on human resources and lab facilities supported by previous FP7 CAPACITIES and H2020 WIDESPREAD projects, expanding their capacity to deal with complex research and innovation challenges linked to sustainable development in the tropics. To achieve its objectives, TROPIBIO will develop the following main activities: (i) Upgrade research capacity by expanding the human potential and fostering a critical mass of researchers with inter-disciplinary expertise in tropical biodiversity and ecosystems research; (ii) Consolidate the TwinLab network by strengthening internal communication, enhancing in situ technical and logistic conditions, and promoting collaborative research among institutions; (iii) Reinforce CIBIO’s network of international partnerships at the EU and global level; and (iv) Enhance long-term sustainability of tropical research at CIBIO by increasing innovation potential and impact, and thus the capacities to attract national and international funding. These activities will contribute to the advanced training of human resources, and to the communication, dissemination and exploitation of CIBIO’s research and innovation. Also, they will better integrate CIBIO with the European Research Area (ERA), and foster its participation in EUAfrica cooperation in science, technology and innovation. This project is funded by the European Commission, with an overall budget of 2.5 million euros (Grant Agreement number: 854248 — TROPIBIO — H2020-WIDESPREAD-2018-2020/H2020-WIDESPREAD-2018-04)
Project
The purpose of this Special Issue is to compile high-quality papers focusing on 1) predator–prey relationships between carnivore predators and their prey, 2) multidimensional ecological interactions between carnivore species, 3) how these interactions facilitate coexistence in carnivore communities, and 4) the ecological consequences of these interactions on other ecological levels, such as herbivores or beyond. We welcome field studies analyzing ecological interactions between carnivore species and their prey, in particular, case studies and review articles summarizing and analyzing trends from other studies and modeling articles based on data obtained from the literature. We expect that this Special Issue will contribute to fill the gaps in our knowledge of how carnivore species coexist and interact with other ecosystem elements.