Pedro Diniz

Pedro Diniz
University of Brasília | UnB

PhD in Ecology

About

35
Publications
3,725
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
191
Citations
Introduction
I am a behavioral ecologist studying acoustic communication in birds. My research focuses on understanding the ecological and social mechanisms promoting variation in the structure and function of acoustic signals. I am currently studying the duetting of rufous horneros (Furnarius rufus), the leap display of male blue-black grassquits (Volatinia jacarina), and the male song of the white-vented violetears (Colibri serrirostris).
Additional affiliations
April 2018 - December 2019
UNIVERSIDADE VILA VELHA
Position
  • Postdoctoral Researcher
Description
  • Effects of noise pollution on avian acoustic communication

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Temporal coordination of duets consists of nonrandom overlap, alternation or association between rhythms of acoustic elements. Since duet coordination presumably requires high attentiveness between signallers, the coalition quality hypothesis suggests it may indicate the ability or motivation of partners to engage cooperatively in aggressive intera...
Article
Duetting is a collective behavior and might have multiple functions, including joint territory defense and mate guarding. An important step toward understanding the adaptive function of bird song is to determine if and how singing behavior varies seasonally. However, seasonal patterns for duetting species are different from the pattern described fo...
Article
Full-text available
Duetting has been intensively studied, but we still have little consensus about its fitness consequences. Some studies suggest that duetting functions in acoustic mate guarding to prevent cuckoldry (acoustic paternity guarding hypothesis), whereas other studies argue that duetting is a cooperative behavior to defend common resources (territory defe...
Article
Full-text available
Duets in breeding pairs may reflect a situation of conflict, whereby an individual an‐ swers its partner's song as a form of unilateral acoustic mate guarding or, alternatively, it may reflect cooperation, when individuals share in territory defense or safeguard the partnership. The degree of coordination between the sexes when responding to solo v...
Article
Parental attractiveness influences paternal and maternal efforts in a wide range of animals that exhibit biparental care. However, we still lack an understanding concerning the direction of the covariance between attractiveness and parental effort, perhaps because studies typically consider only one or a subset of multiple attractiveness signals. I...
Article
In mixed-species groups (MSGs), individuals from different species may locate and communicate about the presence of predators and prey quickly and accurately but may compete for food and favourable positions in the flock. Thus, foraging behaviour is likely to change when individuals participate in MSGs compared with single-species groups (SSGs). In...
Preprint
Full-text available
Invasive grasses have spread over large areas of ancient savannas worldwide and have extensively impacted native landscapes in the neotropics. However, our understanding on how the displacement of native by exotic grasses may affect tree-grass coexistence in neotropical savannas is still poor. The present study tested the imposed effects of an exot...
Article
Dear enemy and nasty neighbour are both phenomena that depend on the ability to discriminate between neighbours and strangers. Although both mechanisms reduce costs in territorial maintenance, their occurrence has been poorly investigated in duetting animals. In this study, we sought to test neighbour–stranger discrimination via cues in duets by th...
Article
Breeding biology data are crucial for avian life history theory, but this information is unavailable for nearly half of the current living tropical bird species. Predation is the main driver of nest survival among tropical birds, and spatial and temporal factors may affect nest predation risk and survival. In this study, we describe the breeding bi...
Article
Animals can encode information within acoustic signals, particularly, bird songs can be remarkably complex and can indicate individual identity and quality. Two main sets of hypotheses attempt to explain the evolution of increased birdsong complexity across large-scale geographic ranges: 1) larger acoustic space availability, and 2) greater sexual...
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic noise constrains the transmission of birdsong and alters the behavior of receivers. Many birds adjust their acoustic signals to minimize the interference of anthropogenic noise on signal transmission. Birds may also change their acoustic signals to exchange information during aggressive interactions. However, it is unclear how birds d...
Article
Full-text available
In the last decade, studies in bird breeding biology have shown that infidelity is prevalent in socially monogamous species. Here, we describe an extra-pair copulation (EPC) event in the Rufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus), a socially monogamous bird with year-round territoriality and low levels of extra-pair paternity. Before the EPC, a within-pair c...
Article
The weekend effect hypothesis predicts that weekly cycles of human activity impact animal behaviour and physiology. This hypothesis has been supported in the context of recreational activity in natural environments, but it is unknown whether it also applies to urban animals. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the sentinel (territorial vigilance...
Article
In the tropics, birds produce smaller clutches and have a higher risk of nest predation when compared to those in the temperate region. Consequently, a high annual adult survival and a long lifespan are expected for tropical birds. Although determining longevity is a key step towards understanding the life-history strategies of wildlife, the lifesp...
Article
Primates' predators, such as carnivore mammals, usually rely on camouflage to increase proximity to prey and start a predatory attempt. Camouflage depends not only on the color pattern presented by a predator's pelage but also on the background scene in which the hunting takes place. Another factor that influences camouflage effectiveness is prey's...
Article
Urbanization reduces diversity and alters avian assemblages worldwide. Urban greenspaces can alleviate this effect by promoting habitat for some species, but the relevance of urban greenspaces for megadiverse, Neotropical avifauna is misunderstood. Here, we evaluated whether bird diversity (taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional) and composition wo...
Article
Predation risk affects a broad range of bird behaviours, especially parental care. The adaptive behavioural changes presented by both parents, however, may differ according to different levels of predation risk suffered by each sex. This is especially prominent in sexually dichromatic species, where one of the sexes is more visually conspicuous and...
Article
Predation risk is often hypothesized to be a cost of escalated fighting, and it relies on the assumption that predators eavesdrop on distracted prey. However, there is no direct evidence supporting these two ideas. Here, I report a predation event that occurred immediately after escalated fighting in birds. Two Rufous Horneros (Furnarius rufus) wer...
Article
Aposematism and crypticity are visual defensive strategies against predation; however, the relative effectiveness of these two strategies to reduce the risk of predation is not yet fully understood. We evaluated the risk of predation for caterpillars with cryptic and aposematic colouration as well as the probability of predation relative to the nat...
Article
Full-text available
Road construction is considered to be one of the primary causes of forest fragmenta‐tion, and little is known about how roads affect bird reproductive success. The objec‐tive of this study was to assess the survival rate of artificial nests along an edge associated with a highway and in the interior of a tabuleiro forest. The study was performed at...
Article
Sexual signaling coevolves with the sensory systems of intended receivers; however, predators may be unintended receivers of sexual signals. Conspicuous aerial displays in some species may place males at high risk of predation from eavesdropping predators. There are three different hypotheses to explain how signaling males can deal with increased p...
Article
Predation risk may be an important factor affecting female mate choice. Hypothetically, females could choose extravagantly ornamented males that survive in high predation risk environments. However, this decision could be different if choosing a conspicuous male under high predation risk is costly for females or results in reduced offspring surviva...
Article
Intraspecific aggressive behavior usually mediates competition for breeding and non-breeding resources among females and for mating opportunities among males. Variation in intrasexual aggressive levels across social and breeding contexts might then differ between sexes or converge due to different reasons. We studied three colonies of the polygynou...
Article
Full-text available
In seasonal rainfall systems, seed dormancy is a strategy to avoid germination and seedling emergence in the dry season. Grass species in Brazilian savannas (Cerrado) show variation in seed dispersal timing and mechanisms, and occur in different habitat types (distinguished by soil moisture) within a seasonal rainfall environment. However, it is un...
Article
Full-text available
Open savannas and wet grasslands are present under the same seasonal macro-climate in central Brazil. However, in open savannas, temperatures during fires are higher than in wet grasslands. Grasses dominate both ecosystems and exhibit large variation in seed dormancy. We hypothesise that seeds of grass species from open savannas are more tolerant t...
Article
Neotropical ovenbirds (family Furnariidae) are largely sexually monomorphic and monochromatic, which leads to the assumption that sexual selection has had little effect on the evolution of the morphological and plumage traits of the species in the family. We studied a wild population of the Rufous Hornero (Furnarius rufus albogularis) and used morp...
Article
Full-text available
Females may prefer elaborate sexual ornaments in males as these can be costly and may honestly indicate male viability. We used a wild population of the Blue-black Grassquit (Volatinia jacarina) in central Brazil to test whether more ornamented males have lower parasite loads (parasite-mediated sexual selection) and/or better body condition (condit...
Article
Full-text available
Phenology in plants is closely related to the environmental features of their habitats, which can act as habitat filtering, clustering species with particular adaptations. On the other hand, aggregation of species can lead to competition between them, segregating their niches. We investigated if habitat filtering and interspecific competition influ...
Article
Full-text available
The Coal-crested Finch (Charitospiza eucosma) is a rare, globally near threatened and poorly known species, endemic to the savannas of central Brazil and Bolivia. We investigated this species' breeding biology in the Brazilian savannas between 2008–2010. We found 44 nests of Coal-crested Finches during one and a half breeding seasons. Coal-crested...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual dimorphism in birds is often attributed to sexual selection, but another interpretation suggests the evolution of this phenomenon by natural selection. Predation may be an important selective pressure, acting mainly on females. In this study, I tested the latter hypothesis on the coal-crested finch (Charitospiza eucosma Oberholser, 1905) in...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Partners coordinate songs into duets in many Neotropical bird species. Using in-depth field observations, playback experiments, breeding, and genetic analyses, we aim to understand the adaptive function of duets and their coordination properties.
Project
The climate is certainly among the major factors determining the dynamics, distribution and resilience of the vegetation in a global context. Factors such as rainfall and temperature regimes are primary determinants of the development of a grassland, savanna or forest physiognomy. Changes in the climate affected the global distribution of vegetation in the past, are currently affecting it and will inevitably determine its future. Tropical ecosystems, such as those associated with the Cerrado may suffer particularly severe impacts. In these biomes the projected changes in climate include increase in average and maximum temperature, greater irregularity in the distribution of rainfall and more intense and lasting droughts, which in some regions may lead to higher fire frequency. By simulating future climate scenarios under lab conditions we intend to determine how native plant species behave in response to intensified stress conditions, such as high temperatures, drought and higher concentrations of carbon dioxide, identifying their physiological responses to these conditions, establishing their vulnerability curves to climatic agents, and designing models to predict consequences of such climate changes on vegetation cover in the coming decades in central Brazil. These studies will focus on the most critical stages of a plant life cycle, namely, survival and germination of seedsand growth of seedlings, extremely decisive stages of the dynamics of populations and communities when considering climate impacts on vegetation in large-scale space and time. By studying the impacts of different climate scenarios on the ability of native species to recruit, this proposal intend to contribute for a better understanding of how species respond to the climatic changes predicted for the coming decades. In addition, these results will make possible to model how the vegetation types (defined primarily as forest, savanna and grassland) will behave under these climate scenarios and anticipate how the changing climate will modify patterns of vegetation distribution in central Brazil. By modeling climate impacts on vegetation, the results of this project will help to unravel influences of climate change on ecosystem services, and give support for the development of practical guidelines for restoration, management and conservation of ecosystems and their natural resources.