Pawlok Dass

Pawlok Dass
Northern Arizona University | NAU · SICCS

Doctor of Philosophy

About

12
Publications
5,195
Reads
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173
Citations
Introduction
Postdoctoral research scholar working on the interactions between the climate and the terrestrial vegetation carbon cycle.
Additional affiliations
March 2014 - present
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Investigating the response of the terrestrial vegetation of northern Eurasia to anthropogenic climate change.
September 2012 - September 2012
Universität Potsdam
Position
  • Guest lecturer
Description
  • Delivered a guest lecture titled 'Modeling the Land-Biosphere'
Education
March 2010 - December 2013
International Max Planck Research School on Earth System Modeling
International Max Planck Research School on Earth System Modeling
Field of study
  • Geosciences
July 2007 - July 2009
Forest Research Institute Dehradun
Field of study
  • Environment Management
August 2004 - July 2007
Presidency University, Kolkata
Field of study
  • Physiology (Human)

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition is widely considered to increase CO2 sequestration by land plants on a global scale. Here, we demonstrate that bedrock nitrogen weathering contributes significantly more to nitrogen‐carbon interactions than anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. This working hypothesis is based on the introduction of empirical results...
Article
Full-text available
Although natural terrestrial ecosystems have sequestered ~25% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, the long-term sustainability of this key ecosystem service is under question. Forests have traditionally been viewed as robust carbon (C) sinks; however, extreme heat-waves, drought and wildfire have increased tree mortality, particularly in widespread sem...
Article
Full-text available
Terrestrial ecosystems of northern Eurasia are demonstrating an increasing gross primary productivity (GPP), yet few studies have provided definitive attribution for the changes. While prior studies point to increasing temperatures as the principle environmental control, influences from moisture and other factors are less clear. We assess how chang...
Data
Full-text available
A warming climate is altering land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO 2) cycling through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and its component fluxes of gross primary produ...
Article
Full-text available
A warming climate is altering land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) cycling through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and its component fluxes of gross primary produc...
Article
Full-text available
Terrestrial ecosystems of northern Eurasia are greening, yet few studies have provided definitive attribution for the changes. While prior studies point to increasing temperatures as the principle environmental control, influences from moisture and other factors are less clear. We assess how changes in temperature, precipitation, cloudiness and for...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
High latitude terrestrial vegetation, by influencing and being influenced by the hydrological and carbon cycles, play a critical role in the global climate. Under a warming climate vegetation productivity is expected to increase. While agreement among remote sensing data point to an increase in vegetation greenness, there is considerable uncertaint...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
High latitude terrestrial vegetation, by influencing and being influenced by the hydrological and carbon cycles, play a critical role in the global climate. Under a warming climate vegetation productivity is expected to increase. While agreement among remote sensing data point to an increase in vegetation greenness, there is considerable uncertaint...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have concluded that deforestation of the high latitudes result in a global cooling. This is mainly because of the increased albedo of deforested land which dominates over other biogeophysical and biogeochemical mechanisms in the energy balance. This dominance however may be due to an underestimation of the biogeochemical response,...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have concluded that deforestation of mid to high latitudes result in a global cooling. This is mainly because of the increased albedo of deforested land which dominates over other biogeophysical and biogeochemical mechanisms in the energy balance. This dominance however may be due to an underestimation of the biogeochemical respons...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous studies have shown that bioenergy, being one of the renewable energies with the lowest costs, is expected to play an important role in the near future as climate change mitigation measure. Current practices of converting crop products such as carbohydrates or plant oils to ethanol or biodiesel have limited capabilities to curb emission. Mo...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Usually we consider primary energy, i.e. 100% conversion efficiency. However, for realistic studies we need to consider the actual energy conversion efficiency.

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