Pawel Matusz

Pawel Matusz
HES-SO Valais-Wallis | HES-SO · Bereich eHealth

PhD

About

58
Publications
18,098
Reads
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1,014
Citations
Introduction
I am SNSF Lecturer at HES-SO Valais, Head of Group of Real-World Neuroscience (GROWN) & Adjunct Professor at Vanderbilt University. My interests focus on how attention is controlled in naturalistic, multisensory settings, how the underlying brain (EEG) & beh mechanisms develop and how we can harness the developing attention to support education & brain rehabilitation. I combine psychophysics, EEG, VR & modelling. I now study vision - attention links to better treat visually impaired people.
Additional affiliations
January 2018 - present
HES-SO Valais-Wallis
Position
  • Group Leader
February 2017 - present
Lausanne University Hospital
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Employing electrical neuroimaging to better understand the interactions of multisensory processes, top-down attentional control and experience in shaping brain development, cognitive functioning and early learning
January 2014 - February 2017
Lausanne University Hospital
Position
  • Fellow
Description
  • Working on a project investigating neural mechanisms underlying perception and learning of multisensory objects, funded by a research grant awarded by the Swiss National Science Foundation to Prof. Micah Murray.
Education
October 2009 - May 2013
Birkbeck, University of London
Field of study
  • Cognitive Psychology
October 2004 - July 2009
University of Social Sciences & Humanities
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (58)
Article
Real-world environments are typically dynamic, complex, and multisensory in nature and require the support of top-down attention and memory mechanisms for us to be able to drive a car, make a shopping list, or pour a cup of coffee. Fundamental principles of perception and functional brain organization have been established by research utilizing wel...
Preprint
Full-text available
Research on attentional control has largely focused on single senses and the importance of one’s behavioural goals in controlling attention. However, everyday situations are multisensory and contain regularities, both likely influencing attention. We investigated how visual attentional capture is simultaneously impacted by top-down goals, multisens...
Preprint
Full-text available
Schooling may shape children’s abilities to control their attention, but it is unclear if this impact extends from control over visual objects to encompass multisensory objects, which are more typical of everyday environments. We compared children across three primary school grades (Swiss 1 st , 3 rd , and 5 th grade) on their performance on a comp...
Article
Full-text available
Outside the laboratory, people need to pay attention to relevant objects that are typically multisensory, but it remains poorly understood how the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms develop. We investigated when adult-like mechanisms controlling one’s attentional selection of visual and multisensory objects emerge across childhood. Five-, 7-, and...
Conference Paper
Studies of amblyopia have typically focused on purely visual problems, although amblyopia also causes deficits in motor control: trajectories have inaccurate endpoints, with increased duration and pathlength. Poor stereo-acuity may explain these deficits. We will compare behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of motor control to stereovision...
Article
In cognitive neurosciences, fundamental principles of mental processes and functional brain organization have been established with highly controlled tasks and testing environments. Recent technical advances allowed the investigation of these functions and their brain mechanisms in naturalistic settings. The diversity in those approaches have been...
Article
Full-text available
Research on attentional control has largely focused on single senses and the importance of behavioural goals in controlling attention. However, everyday situations are multisensory and contain regularities, both likely influencing attention. We investigated how visual attentional capture is simultaneously impacted by top-down goals, the multisensor...
Article
Full-text available
Schooling may shape children's abilities to control their attention, but it is unclear if this impact extends from control over visual objects to encompass multisensory objects, which are more typical of everyday environments. We compared children across three primary school grades (Swiss first, third, and fifth grades) on their performance on a ga...
Chapter
Full-text available
Selective attention is the ability to promote the processing of objects important for the accomplishment of our behavioral goals (target objects) over the objects not important to those goals (distractor objects). Previous investigations have shown that the mechanisms of selective attention contribute to enhancing perception in both simple daily ta...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
PJM & DS - joint senior authorship Selective attention is the ability to promote the processing of objects important for the accomplishment of our behavioral goals (target objects) over the objects not important to those goals (distractor objects). Previous investigations have shown that the mechanisms of selective attention contribute to enhanci...
Preprint
Full-text available
In cognitive neurosciences, fundamental principles of mental processes and functional brain organization have been established with highly controlled tasks and testing environments. Recent technical advances allowed to investigate those functions and their brain mechanisms in naturalistic settings. The diversity in those approaches has been recentl...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Abstract Tasks designed to study adult attention skills have helped clarify the development of such skills in childhood. We recently demonstrated how children develop goal-based visual and stimulus-driven multisensory attention. Here, we tested whether children improve these attention skills within a single testing session, and whether this depend...
Preprint
Full-text available
Attentional control outside of the laboratory operates in multisensory settings, but the development of mechanisms subserving such control remains poorly understood. We investigated when, over the course of childhood, adult-like attentional control mechanisms begin to emerge. Children aged five, seven, and nine were compared with adults on behaviou...
Article
Contemporary schemas of brain organization now include multisensory processes both in low-level cortices as well as at early stages of stimulus processing. Evidence has also accumulated showing that unisensory stimulus processing can result in cross-modal effects. For example, task-irrelevant and lateralised sounds can activate visual cortices; a p...
Article
Full-text available
The capacity to integrate information from different senses is central for coherent perception across the lifespan from infancy onwards. Later in life, multisensory processes are related to cognitive functions, such as speech or social communication. During learning, multisensory processes can in fact enhance subsequent recognition memory for unise...
Preprint
Full-text available
Contemporary schemas of brain organization now include multisensory processes both in low-level cortices as well as at early stages of stimulus processing. Evidence has also accumulated showing that unisensory stimulus processing can result in cross-modal effects. For example, task-irrelevant and lateralized sounds can activate visual cortices; a p...
Poster
Full-text available
The aim of educational neuroscience research is to better understand the neurocognitive processes shaping how developing brains learn. We now understand that children’s ability to learn and deploy new skills depends critically on their capacity to promote the processing of task-relevant information and suppress the goal-irrelevant information (i.e....
Conference Paper
Visual attention skills shape learning, but how do these abilities interact with multisensory processes that must contribute to shaping literacy and numeracy skills? We investigated how involuntary multisensory integration and top-down visual attention develop together during primary school and how these processes contribute to reading and basic ma...
Preprint
The capacity to integrate information from different senses is central for coherent perception across the lifespan from infancy onwards. Later in life, multisensory processes are related to cognitive functions, such as speech or social communication. During learning, multisensory processes can in fact enhance subsequent recognition memory for unise...
Conference Paper
In real-world environments, information is typically multisensory, and objects are a primary unit of information processing. Object recognition and action necessitates attentional selection of task-relevant from among task-irrelevant objects. However, brain and cognitive mechanisms governing attentional selection of multisensory objects remain poor...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Premature infants are at risk for abnormal sensory development due to brain immaturity at birth and atypical early sensory experiences in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. This altered sensory development can have downstream effects on other more complex developmental processes. There are currently no interventions that address rehabili...
Article
Full-text available
Sensory substitution is an effective means to rehabilitate many visual functions after visual impairment or blindness. Tactile information, for example, is particularly useful for functions such as reading, mental rotation, shape recognition, or exploration of space. Extant haptic technologies typically rely on real physical objects or pneumaticall...
Chapter
Everyday environments, such as classrooms or the High Street, typically stimulate multiple senses at once (i.e., are multisensory). Evidence from the last 40 years has characterized how multisensory perception unfolds and manifests neurophysiologically. However, a large majority of this research has focused on the effects of multisensory processes...
Article
Full-text available
Cerebral palsy (CP) is predominantly a disorder of movement, with evidence of sensory-motor dysfunction. CIMT1 is a widely used treatment for hemiplegic CP. However, effects of CIMT on somatosensory processing remain unclear. To examine potential CIMT-induced changes in cortical tactile processing, we designed a prospective study, during which 10 c...
Article
Full-text available
In real-world environments information is typically multisensory, and objects are a primary unit of information processing. Object recognition and action necessitates attentional selection of task-relevant from among task-irrelevant objects. However, the brain and cognitive mechanisms governing these processes remain not well understood. Here, we d...
Article
Full-text available
Traditional models developed within cognitive psychology suggest that attention is deployed flexibly and irrespective of differences in expertise with to-be-attended stimuli. However, everyday environments are inherently multisensory and observers differ in familiarity with particular unisensory representations (e.g., number words, in contrast with...
Article
Full-text available
Everyday vision includes the detection of stimuli, figure-ground segregation, as well as object localization and recognition. Such processes must often surmount impoverished or noisy conditions; borders are perceived despite occlusion or absent contrast gradients. These illusory contours (ICs) are an example of so-called mid-level vision, with an e...
Preprint
Full-text available
Traditional models developed within cognitive psychology suggest that attention is deployed fexibly and irrespective of diferences in expertise with to-be-attended stimuli. However, everyday environments are inherently multisensory and observers difer in familiarity with particular unisensory representations (e.g., number words, in contrast with di...
Preprint
Traditional models developed within cognitive psychology suggest that attention is deployed flexibly and irrespective of differences in expertise with to-be-attended stimuli. However, everyday environments are inherently multisensory and observers differ in familiarity with particular unisensory representations (e.g., number words, in contrast with...
Article
Full-text available
Multisensory information typically confers neural and behavioural advantages over unisensory information. We used a simple audio-visual detection task to compare healthy young (HY), healthy older (HO) and mild-cognitive impairment (MCI) individuals. Neuropsychological tests assessed individuals’ learning and memory impairments. First, we provide mu...
Article
Distinct anatomical and functional pathways are postulated for analysing a sound's object-related ('what') and space-related ('where') information. It remains unresolved to which extent distinct or overlapping neural resources subserve specific object-related dimensions (i.e. who is speaking and what is being said can both be derived from the same...
Article
Traditional studies of memory and object recognition involved objects presented within a single sensory modality (i.e., purely visual or purely auditory objects). However, in naturalistic settings, objects are often evaluated and processed in a multisensory manner. This begets the question of how object representations that combine information from...
Article
Full-text available
Frontiers for Young Minds: New Discovery The world is a distracting place – full of shapes and colors, sounds, and smells that constantly excite our senses. Sometimes, things that distract us can stimulate multiple senses at once. When the TV is switched on while we are trying to read, moving images on the screen are accompanied by sounds. But you...
Article
Every year, 15 million preterm infants are born, and most spend their first weeks in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) [1]. Although essential for the support and survival of these infants, NICU sensory environments are dramatically different from those in which full-term infants mature and thus likely impact the development of functional brain...
Article
Full-text available
Our understanding of how perception operates in real-world environments has been substantially advanced by studying both multisensory processes and “top-down” control processes influencing sensory processing via activity from higher-order brain areas, such as attention, memory, and expectations. As the two topics have been traditionally studied sep...
Article
Full-text available
Diagnosing heart conditions by auscultation is an important clinical skill, commonly learnt by medical students. However, clinical proficiency for this skill is in decline [1], and new teaching methods are needed. Successful discrimination of heartbeat sounds is believed to benefit mainly from acoustical training [2]. Based on recent studies of aud...
Article
Objects’ borders are readily perceived despite absent contrast gradients, e.g. due to poor lighting or occlusion. In humans, a visual evoked potential (VEP) correlate of illusory contour (IC) sensitivity, the “IC effect”, has been identified with an onset at ~90ms and generators within bilateral lateral occipital cortices (LOC). The IC effect is ob...
Article
This study analysed high-density event-related potentials (ERPs) within an electrical neuroimaging framework to provide insights regarding the interaction between multisensory processes and stimulus probabilities. Specifically, we identified the spatio-temporal brain mechanisms by which the proportion of temporally congruent and task-irrelevant aud...
Article
Cataracts cause one third of blindness worldwide [1]. Although nowadays cataracts are readily treated surgically (and potentially in the near future even using eye-drops [2]), these techniques are not equally accessible worldwide. The case of Claude Monet, who went blind late in life, illustrates the debilitating consequences of cataracts (Figure 1...
Article
Full-text available
The study investigated whether the strength of the relationship between attentional and implicit-memory biases for threat-related material can be moderated by individual differences in temperament and personality. A spatial cueing task, where task-irrelevant angry, happy, and neutral faces acted as spatial cues preceding a target, was immediately f...
Article
Single-trial encounters with multisensory stimuli affect both memory performance and early-latency brain responses to visual stimuli. Whether and how auditory cortices support memory processes based on single-trial multisensory learning is unknown and may differ qualitatively and quantitatively from comparable processes within visual cortices due t...
Article
How does the multi-sensory nature of stimuli influence information processing? Cognitive systems with limited selective attention can elucidate these processes. Six-year-olds, 11-yearolds and 20-year-olds engaged in a visual search task that required them to detect a pre-defined colored shape under conditions of low or high visual perceptual load....
Article
Full-text available
Traditional views contend that behaviorally-relevant multisensory interactions occur relatively late during stimulus processing and subsequently to influences of (top-down) attentional control. In contrast, work from the last 15 years shows that information from different senses is integrated in the brain also during the initial 100ms after stimulu...
Article
Multisensory processes facilitate perception of currently-presented stimuli and can likewise enhance later object recognition. Memories for objects originally encountered in a multisensory context can be more robust than those for objects encountered in an exclusively visual or auditory context [1 • Thelen A. • Murray M.M. The efficacy of single-t...
Article
To test whether the attentional selection of targets defined by a combination of visual and auditory features is guided in a modality-specific fashion or by control processes that are integrated across modalities, we measured attentional capture by visual stimuli during unimodal visual and audiovisual search. Search arrays were preceded by spatiall...
Article
We investigated whether top-down attentional control settings can specify task-relevant features in different sensory modalities (vision and audition). Two audiovisual search tasks were used where a spatially uninformative visual singleton cue preceded a target search array. In different blocks, participants searched for a visual target (defined by...
Article
Full-text available
Multisensory integration increases the salience of sensory events and, therefore, possibly also their ability to capture attention in visual search. This was investigated in two experiments where spatially uninformative color change cues preceded visual search arrays with color-defined targets. Tones were presented synchronously with these cues on...
Article
Full-text available
Attention-driven bias for threat-related stimuli in implicit memory. Preliminary results from the Posner cueing paradigm An implicit memory advantage for angry faces was investigated in this experiment by means of an additional cueing task. Participants were to assess the orientation of a triangle's peak, which side of presentation was cued informa...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Czy obiekt stymulujący dwie modalności zmysłowe zostanie spostrzeżony bardziej efektywnie niż obiekt stymulujący tylko jedną modalność? W czym przejawia się ta efektywność i gdzie są jej granice? Przetwarzanie wielozmysłowe (multisensory processing) jest przedmiotem trwających od ponad czterdziestu lat [za Stanford i Stein 2007] intensywnych badań....

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Projects

Projects (8)
Project
Paediatric amblyopia (PA, lazy eye) is a common, developmental vision disorder in children. Typical treatment for PA is based on forcing the use of the bad eye to obtain a clear retinal image in each eye. But several aspects of PA vision disorder, like the involvement of 3D vision and motor function, are still understudied and not integrated in the rehabilitation process. The EU-funded V-HAB project will conduct a deep investigation into vision-related sciences with emphasis on the role of motor control as well as selective attention in PA. This project will improve the efficiency of PA therapy and introduce innovative engaging 3D games in a virtual environment to make the therapy attractive for children. https://cordis.europa.eu/project/id/890641
Project
It remains unclear how to best bridge traditional, unisensory and simplified laboratory experiments and more recent neuroscientific investigations “in the wild”. One such possible way is through a naturalistic laboratory research approach, where the information processing demands are emulated yet they remain carefully controlled. In line with this, brain and cognitive processing of objects in naturalistic environments is modulated by, and should be studied within a context of: 1) the multisensory nature of these objects (cf. emotional valence), 2) variability in stimulus relevance/ task demands, and 3) differences in skills and experience of the observers. The aim of this project is to identify and test new approaches to best understand how neuro-cognitive functions operate in the outside world.
Project
Goal: This project aims to provide much-needed clarification of the development of attentional control mechanisms engaged by multisensory stimuli compared to the more traditionally studied visual (or auditory) stimuli, from the underlying brain mechanisms to their role in shaping educational outcomes. We have a pretty clear understanding of how skills in paying attention to visual (or auditory) information shape educational achievements. However, we know close to nothing about how children develop their skills in attention to multisensory information, at what age do different adult-like audiovisual attentional control mechanisms emerge, or how they are shaped by traditional types of experience like amount of schooling.