Paweł Jakuszyk

Paweł Jakuszyk
Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology | NENCKI · Laboratory of Brain Imaging

MS

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4
Publications
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Publications

Publications (4)
Article
Prioritization of self-related information (e.g. self-face) may be driven by its extreme familiarity. Nevertheless, the findings of numerous behavioral studies reported a self-preference for initially unfamiliar information, arbitrarily associated with the self. In the current study, we investigated the neural underpinnings of extremely familiar st...
Article
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During the COVID-19 pandemic, we have been confronted with faces covered by surgical-like masks. This raises a question about how our brains process this kind of visual information. Thus, the aims of the current study were twofold: (1) to investigate the role of attention in the processing of different types of faces with masks, and (2) to test whe...
Article
Full-text available
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a heterogenous condition with differences between patients regarding disease presentation, imaging features, disease activity, prognosis and treatment responses. Following the discovery of new biomarkers, the concept of MS has evolved, with syndromes previously considered to be its variants now recognised as separate enti...
Experiment Findings
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A brief presentation of study design and findings.

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Projects (2)
Project
This is a 24-month longitudinal study focused on asymptomatic subjects with incidental MRI brain findings suggestive of multiple sclerosis (termed radiologically isolated syndrome, RIS) who will be compared with healthy controls and clinically definite multiple sclerosis patients. The aim of the study is to examine RIS subjects using cognitive testing and non-conventional magnetic resonance to identify patterns of hidden damage to the nervous system despite the absence of symptoms. We are now recruiting a post-doc with neuroimaging/data science skills to this study (four-year contract starts 1st Oct 2022, based in Nencki Institute, Warsaw). For more information email: m.jurynczyk@nencki.edu.pl
Project
Mobile technology is spreading rapidly around the world. It is estimated that more than 5 billion people own some kind of mobile device and that over half of these devices are smartphones (Taylor and Silver, 2019). When observing our everyday environment, it is easy to notice that smartphones have truly become ubiquitous. We use them while walking (Lin, & Huang, 2017), working (Pitichat, 2013), learning (Baert et al., 2018), driving (Lipovac et al., 2017) etc. Unfortunately, many studies show that smartphone overuse can have a substantial impact on people's well-being (Reinecke et al., 2016; Satici & Uysal, 2015), stress levels (Anrijs et al., 2018), sleep quality (Yang, Liao, Li, 2019) and personal relationships (McDaniel, Galovan, Cravens, Drouin, 2018). Excessive smartphone use may also cause increased risk of depression and anxiety (Yang, Liao & Li, 2019). In addition, the fact that smartphone users receive notifications throughout the day has made smartphones a source of distraction and inattention as well (Marty-Dugas, Ralph, Oakman, & Smilek, 2018). Therefore, more and more studies focus on the impact of smartphones use different cognitive functions. For example, it has been proven that being distracted by smartphone sounds and excessive smartphones use has negative impact on sustained attention processes(Stothart, Mitchum & Yehnert, 2015; Kushlev, Proulx & Dunn, 2016; Marty-Dugas, Ralph, Oakman, & Smilek, 2018). In this study, we want to expand on this by focussing on the effects of smartphone-associated auditory distractors on sustained attention, using an EEG approach. The experimental design is based on behavioral studies, which have shown that simply hearing smartphone sounds can be enough to be distracted and to have a significantly worse performance on a primary task (Stothart, Mitchum & Yehnert, 2015; Röer, Bell & Buchner, 2014). We chose the sound of a cell phone that vibrates, as it is universally recognized as a smartphone-related sound. By manipulating task-irrelevant auditory distractors (vibration sounds and neutral sounds) we will attempt to measure the decrement of sustained attention and attentional lapses. Despite having some already existing evidence (Kim, Kim, & Kang, 2016) there is still a need to perform more psychophysiological experiments giving better insight into smartphone usage consequences on human cognition. In addition, our goal is to correlate the combined behavioral and psycho-physiological measures of attention with an objective measure of smartphone use behavior, logged with the Mobile DNA app (e.g. Anrijs et al., 2018).