Pavle Andjus

Pavle Andjus
University of Belgrade · Center for laser microscopy Faculty of Biology

Professor, PhD

About

133
Publications
14,872
Reads
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1,662
Citations
Citations since 2017
47 Research Items
979 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250
Introduction
Pavle Andjus currently works at the Center for laser microscopy Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade. Pavle does research in Neuroscience, and Biophysics. Their current project is 'Humoral and Cellular Immunity in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Pathogenesis, Diagnostics and Treatment.'
Additional affiliations
January 2004 - present
University of Belgrade
Position
  • Head of Center

Publications

Publications (133)
Article
Full-text available
Understanding processes that occur after injuries to the central nervous system is essential in order to gain insight into how the restoration of function can be improved. Extracellular glycoprotein tenascin-C (TnC) has numerous functions in wound healing process depending on the expression time, location, isoform and binding partners which makes i...
Article
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, heterogenous neurodegenerative disease which is characterized by weakness and muscle atrophy. While more than 50 genes linked with the familial ALS have been identified, sporadic ALS accounts for the majority of cases and genetic factors contributing to the sporadic form of the disease remain largely...
Article
Full-text available
Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) is emerging as a major principle for the mesoscale organization of proteins, RNAs, and membrane-bound organelles into biomolecular condensates. These condensates allow for rapid cellular responses to changes in metabolic activities and signaling. Nowhere is this regulation more important than in neurons and gli...
Article
We describe an approach for studying the physiology of single live cells using the conceptionally novel upright microscope/patch-clamp configuration. Electrophysiology experiments typically require a microscope with the fixed stage position and the motion control of the microscope objective. Here, we demonstrate that a microscope with a z-axis mova...
Article
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by the death of motor neurons in the spinal cord and the brain. Although this disease is characterized by motoneuron degeneration, non‐neuronal cells such as oligodendrocytes play an important role in the disease onset and progression. The aim of our study was to examin...
Article
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The objective of the study was to describe cellular and molecular markers of radioprotection by anisomycin, focusing on the changes in rat brain tissue. Two-month-old Wistar rats were exposed to a 60Co radiation source at a dose of 6 Gy, with or without radioprotection with anisomycin (150 mg/kg) administered subcutaneously 30 min before or 3 or 6...
Article
Full-text available
The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the brain plays a crucial role in providing optimal conditions for neuronal function. Interactions between neurons and a specialized form of ECM, perineuronal nets (PNN), are considered a key mechanism for the regulation of brain plasticity. Such an assembly of interconnected structural and regulatory molecules has...
Article
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Tenascin C (TnC) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in the extracellular matrix (ECM) during development and in the adult central nervous system (CNS) in regions of active neurogenesis, where neuron development is a tightly regulated process orchestrated by extracellular matrix components. In addition, newborn cells also communicate with glial cell...
Article
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Astrocytes are the first responders to noxious stimuli by undergoing cellular and functional transition referred as reactive gliosis. Every acute or chronic disorder is accompanied by reactive gliosis, which could be categorized as detrimental (A1) of beneficial (A2) for nervous tissue. Another signature of pathological astrocyte activation is dist...
Article
Full-text available
Extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TnC) is highly expressed in vertebrates during embryonic development and thereafter transiently in tissue niches undergoing extensive remodeling during regeneration after injury. TnC’s different functions can be attributed to its multimodular structure represented by distinct domains and alternatively s...
Article
Full-text available
The search for an effective and non-toxic radioprotector is ongoing. We tested a novel, natural aminothiol-based radioprotector, GL2011, that was applied 30 min, 3 h or 6 h after the exposure of male albino Wistar rats to a 6.7 Gy sublethal dose of gamma radiation. The molecular signatures of radioprotection were investigated with Raman microspectr...
Article
Full-text available
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have recently attracted a great deal of interest as they may represent a new biosignaling paradigm. According to the mode of biogenesis, size and composition, two broad categories of EVs have been described, exosomes and microvesicles. EVs have been shown to carry cargoes of signaling proteins, RNA species, DNA and lipi...
Article
Interaction between autoreactive immune cells and astroglia is an important part of the pathologic processes that fuel neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. In this inflammatory disease, immune cells enter into the central nervous system (CNS) and they spread through CNS parenchyma, but the impact of these autoreactive immune cells on the activi...
Article
Full-text available
The present study was designed to follow neuroinflammation after ischemic brain injury in the long-term survival rat model. Immunohistochemistry was performed 2 years after 10 min global brain ischemia due to cardiac arrest. For the visualization of the cellular inflammatory reaction microglial marker Iba1 and astrocyte marker GFAP were used. In po...
Article
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The brain is complex and heterogeneous. Even though numerous independent studies indicate cortical hyperexcitability as a potential contributor to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology, the mechanisms that are responsible for upper motor neuron (UMN) vulnerability remain elusive. To reveal the electrophysiological determinants of corticospi...
Article
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, causing death of motor neurons controlling voluntary muscles. The pathological mechanisms of the disease are only partially understood. The hSOD1‐G93A ALS rat model is characterized by an overexpression of human mutated SOD1, causing increased vulnerability by forming intrace...
Article
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Background: Microglia are essential to maintain cell homeostasis in the healthy brain and are activated after brain injury. Upon activation, microglia polarize towards different phenotypes. The course of microglia activation is complex and depends on signals in the surrounding milieu. Recently, it has been suggested that microglia respond to ion c...
Article
Stem cell-based therapeutics is a rapidly developing field associated with a number of clinical challenges. One such challenge lies in the implementation of methods to track stem cells and stem cell-derived cells in experimental animal models and in the living patient. Here, we provide an overview of cell tracking in the context of cardiac and neur...
Article
Full-text available
S100A4, belonging to a large multifunctional S100 protein family, is a Ca2+-binding protein with a significant role in stimulating the motility of cancer and immune cells, as well as in promoting pro-inflammatory properties in different cell types. In the CNS, there is limited information concerning S100A4 presence and function. In this study, we a...
Article
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Electrical activity is important for brain development. In brain slices, human subplate neurons exhibit spontaneous electrical activity that is highly sensitive to lanthanum. Based on the results of pharmacological experiments in human fetal tissue, we hypothesized that hemichannel-forming connexin (Cx) isoforms 26, 36, and 45 would be expressed on...
Article
Pathological mechanisms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease, are still poorly understood. One subset of familial ALS cases is caused by mutations in the metallo-enzyme copper–zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), increasing the susceptibility of the SOD1 protein to form insoluble intracellular aggregates. Here, we...
Article
Agmatine (AgM, 100 mg/kg i.p.) effect was tested in parallel at two animal models of cerebral ischemia – rat MCAO model (60′/24 h, 60′/48 h, 90′/24 h, 90′/48 h) and gerbil global ischemia (10′) model, administrated 5 min after reperfusion. Aim was to evaluate AgM effect on functional outcome 24 and 48 h after MCAO on neurological and sensor-motor f...
Article
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease, is the most common adult onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons. Disruptions in metal ion homeostasis have been described in association with ALS, but the pathological mechanisms are still poorly understood. One of the familial ALS cases is caused by mutations...
Article
Introduction: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, incurable neurodegenerative disease that targets motoneurons. Cell-based therapies have generated widespread interest as a potential therapeutic approach but no conclusive results have yet been reported either from pre-clinical or clinical studies. Areas covered: This is an integra...
Article
Full-text available
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder with a very fast progression, no diagnostic tool for the presymptomatic phase, and still no effective treatment of the disease. Although ALS affects motor neurons, the overall pathophysiological condition points out to the non-cell autonomous mechanisms, where astrocytes and microg...
Article
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Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a potentially fatal autoimmune disease that is often accompanied by brain atrophy and diverse neuropsychiatric manifestations of unknown origin. More recently, it was observed that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients and lupus-prone mice can be neurotoxic and that acute administration of specific brain-reac...
Article
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Neuroinflammation is one of the major players in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis, and astrocytes are significantly involved in this process. The astrocytic protein S100B can be released in pathological states activating the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Different indications point to an aberrant expression of...
Article
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurological disorder affecting upper and lower motoneurons. The two types, sporadic and familial differ in the aetiopathogenesis but have a similar neuropathology characterized by oxidative stress, excitotoxicity and inflammation. The disease is also characterized by a non-cell autonomous mechanism wi...
Article
Tenascin-C (TnC) is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein implicated in a variety of processes ranging from brain development to synaptic plasticity in the adult vertebrates. Although the role of the TnC gene in regulation of behavior has been investigated, it remained elusive how TnC deficiency interacts with the environment in shaping the behavior...
Article
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor and cognitive domains of the CNS. Mutations in the Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause 20% of familial ALS and provoke formation of intracellular aggregates and copper and zinc unbinding, leading to glial activation and neurodegeneration. Therefore, we investiga...
Article
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting the motor pathways of the central nervous system. Although a number of pathophysiological mechanisms have been described in the disease, post mortem and animal model studies indicate blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and elevated production of reactive oxygen spe...
Article
Full-text available
The importance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein tenascin-C (TnC) and the ECM degrading enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) -2 and -9, in cerebellar histogenesis is well established. This study aimed to examine whether there is a functional relationship between these molecules in regulating structural plasticity of the lateral de...
Chapter
Astrocytes are glial cells that contain a set of significant roles in maintaining the optimal conditions for the intercellular communications and functions in the central nervous system (CNS). They are essential for the control of extracellular ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter concentration, water balance and the support of the blood-brain barrier...
Article
The extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TnC) has been increasingly appreciated as a molecule susceptibly reacting to abnormalities in the mammalian immune system. TnC expression is elevated in inflamed tissues outside the immune system, but also in lymphoid organs. It participates in the promotion of inflammatory responses. Here, the role...
Article
Extensive clinical investigations, in hand with biochemical and biophysical research, have associated brain iron accumulation with the pathogenesis of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) disease. The origin of iron is still not identified, but it is proposed that it forms redox active complexes that can participate in the Fenton reaction genera...
Article
Full-text available
Over 150 mutations in the SOD1 gene that encodes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause 20-25% of familial ALS, albeit without a known gain-of-function mechanism. ALS is also non-cell-autonomous, the interactions between motor neurons and their glial neighbours being implicated in disease progression. The aim here was to investigate the biophysica...
Article
Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, particularly in the nucleus basalis (NB). Similarly, Parkinson's disease (PD) might involve the selective loss of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic neurons. Therefore, lesions of these functionally distinct cholinergic centers in rats might s...
Article
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In this work we compared the mutated liver copper zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (SOD1) protein G93A of the transgenic rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), to wild-type (WT) rat SOD1. We examined their enzymatic activities and effects on isometric contractions of uteri of healthy virgin rats. G93A SOD1 showed a slightly...
Article
Hibernation is a dormant state of some animal species that enables them to survive harsh environmental conditions during the winter seasons. In the hibernating state, preservation of neuronal rhythmic activity at a low level is necessary for maintenance of suspended forms of behavior. As glial cells support rhythmic activity of neurons, preservatio...
Chapter
Neural extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules derived from neurons and glial cells accumulate in the extracellular space and regulate synaptic plasticity through modulation of perisomal GABAergic inhibition, intrinsic neuronal excitability, integrin signaling, and activities of L-type Ca(2+) channels, NMDA receptors, and Rho-associated kinase. Geneti...
Article
Actinidin, a kiwifruit cysteine protease, is a marker allergen for genuine sensitization to this food allergen source. Inhalatory cysteine proteases have the capacity for disruption of tight junctions (TJs) enhancing the permeability of the bronchial epithelium. No such properties have been reported for allergenic food proteases so far. The aim was...
Article
Full-text available
Recently neuroinflammation has gained a particular focus as a key mechanism of ALS. Several studies in vivo as well as in vitro have nominated immunoglobulin G (IgG) isolated from ALS patients as an active contributor to disease onset and progression. We have shown that ALS IgG affects astroglial Ca(2+) excitability and induces downstream activatio...
Article
Responsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) represent a promising direction for development of novel functional MRI (fMRI) methods for the eventual noninvasive assessment of brain function. In particular, SCAs that respond to Ca(2+) may allow tracking neuronal activity independent of brain vasculature, thus avoiding the characteristic limitations of...
Article
Full-text available
GL2011 is a naturally occurring thiol compound and a series of thiol compounds have been proposed as radioprotectors. Radioprotective efficacy of a triple intraperitoneal dose of GL2011 of 100 mg/kg body weight of Wistar rats, 30 min prior to and 3 and 6 h following irradiation (6.7 Gy) was evaluated. Four groups of animals were used, vehicle-treat...
Article
Full-text available
Aim To investigate the survival of laboratory rats after irradiation and to study the cellularity of their bone marrow and the multipotential mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in groups treated with or without a new thiol-based radioprotector (GM2011) Methods Animals were irradiated by a Cobalt gamma source at 6.7 Gy. Treated animals were given i.p...
Article
Full-text available
Astrocytes can tolerate longer periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as compared to neurons. The reasons for this reduced vulnerability are not well understood. Particularly, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in astrocytes, an indicator of the cellular redox state, have not been investigated during reperfusion after extend...
Article
In the current study the link among the γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB)/pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced absence-like seizures and concomitant decreases in the core temperature, as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during rewarming from deep hypothermia produced by a drug-free protocol were investigated. During the rewarming period after deep...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of H2O2 are widely studied in cell cultures and other in vitro systems. However, such investigations are performed with the assumption that H2O2 concentration is constant, which may not properly reflect in vivo settings, particularly in redox-turbulent microenvironments such as mitochondria. Here we introduced and tested a novel concept...
Article
Compelling evidence confirms the use of moderate static magnetic field (SMF) for therapeutic purposes. In order to provide an insight into the mechanisms underlying SMF treatment, it is essential to examine the cellular responses elicited by therapeutically applied SMF, especially in the nervous system. The Na(+)/K(+) pump, by creating and maintain...
Article
Astrocytes are considered essential in the etiopathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We have demonstrated previously that immunoglobulins G (IgG) isolated from patients with ALS enhance the mobility of acidic vesicles in cultured astrocytes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Here we directly examined the impact of purified sporadic ALS Ig...
Article
In the current study the link among the γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB)/pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced absence-like seizures and concomitant decreases in the core temperature, as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during rewarming from deep hypothermia produced by a drug-free protocol were investigated. During the rewarming period after deep...
Article
Trimethyltin (TMT) is a neurotoxicant know to produce significant and selective neuronal degeneration in the rodent CNS (for review, 1). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation in TMT-treated rats has evidenced dilation of lateral ventricles, possibly correlated to alterations in blood brain barrier permeability .In order to explore the mole...
Article
In vitro and in vivo studies on the role of tenascins have shown that the two paradigmatic glycoproteins of the tenascin family, tenascin-C (TnC) and tenascin-R (TnR) play important roles in cell proliferation and migration, fate determination, axonal pathfinding, myelination, and synaptic plasticity. As components of the extracellular matrix, both...
Article
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Dysfunction and death of motor neurons are closely related to the modified astrocytic environment. Astrocytic endfeet, lining the blood-brain barrier (BBB), are enriched in two proteins, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and inwardly rectifying...
Article
Neurogenesis is a process that includes not only generation of new neurons from neural stem and progenitor cells, but functional integration of these new born neurons into cortical circuits as well. The subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus are the sites of active adult neurog...
Article
The extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TN-C), a molecule highly conserved in vertebrates, is widely expressed in neural and non-neural tissue during development, repair processes in the adult organism, and tumorigenesis. In the developing central nervous system (CNS), in different brain regions TN-C is expressed in specific spatial and t...
Article
MRI was employed to follow the neurodegenerative foci and the localization of inflammatory cells by magnetically labeled CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocytes in the ischemia/reperfusion long-lived rats (9 and 13 months after 10 min of cardiac arrest). MRI of ischemic rats showed: (1) blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage in the area of the dorsal hippocampus and b...
Article
The extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TN-C), a molecule highly conserved in vertebrates, is widely expressed in neural and non-neural tissue during development, repair processes in the adult organ