Pauline Vannier

Pauline Vannier
Matis ltd. | Matis · Food safety, Environment and Genetics

PhD

About

51
Publications
8,741
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309
Citations
Additional affiliations
January 2015 - present
Matis ltd.
Position
  • Researcher
Description
  • MicroB3: http://www.microb3.eu/ MaCuMBA: http://www.macumbaproject.eu/ MASE: http://www.mase-eu.org/ GAP Rannís
January 2013 - December 2014
Matis ltd.
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2008 - December 2012
Université de Bretagne Occidentale
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
The oceanic crust is the world’s largest and least explored biosphere on Earth. The basaltic subsurface of Surtsey island in Iceland represents an analog of the warm and newly formed-oceanic crust and offers a great opportunity for discovering novel microorganisms. In this study, we collected borehole fluids, drill cores, and fumarole samples to ev...
Article
Novel thermophilic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from the subsurface of the volcanic island Surtsey off the south coast of Iceland. The strains were isolated from tephra core and borehole fluid samples collected below 70 m depth. The Gram-negative bacteria were rod-shaped (0.3–0.4 µm wide, 1.5–7 µm long), aerobic, non-sporulating and non-mot...
Article
Full-text available
During RV MS Merian expedition MSM75, an international, multidisciplinary team explored the Reykjanes Ridge from June to August 2018. The first area of study, Steinahóll (150–350 m depth), was chosen based on previous seismic data indicating hydrothermal activity. The sampling strategy included ship- and AUV-mounted multibeam surveys, Remotely Oper...
Article
Full-text available
The island of Surtsey was formed in 1963–1967 on the offshore Icelandic volcanic rift zone. It offers a unique opportunity to study the subsurface biosphere in newly formed oceanic crust and an associated hydrothermal-seawater system, whose maximum temperature is currently above 120°C at about 100m below surface. Here, we present new insights into...
Article
Full-text available
Marine microorganisms contribute to the health of the global ocean by supporting the marine food web and regulating biogeochemical cycles. Assessing marine microbial diversity is a crucial step towards understanding the global ocean. The waters surrounding Iceland are a complex environment where relatively warm salty waters from the Atlantic cool d...
Article
Full-text available
Background Extreme terrestrial, analogue environments are widely used models to study the limits of life and to infer habitability of extraterrestrial settings. In contrast to Earth’s ecosystems, potential extraterrestrial biotopes are usually characterized by a lack of oxygen. Methods In the MASE project (Mars Analogues for Space Exploration), we...
Chapter
Full-text available
Five bacterial (facultatively) anaerobic strains, namely Buttiauxella sp. MASE-IM-9, Clostridium sp. MASE-IM-4, Halanaerobium sp. MASE-BB-1, Trichococcus sp. MASE-IM-5, and Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 isolated from different extreme natural environments were subjected to Mars relevant environmental stress factors in the laboratory under controlle...
Article
Five bacterial (facultatively) anaerobic strains, namely Buttiauxella sp. MASE-IM-9, Clostridium sp. MASE-IM-4, Halanaerobium sp. MASE-BB-1, Trichococcus sp. MASE-IM-5, and Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 isolated from different extreme natural environments were subjected to Mars relevant environmental stress factors in the laboratory under controlle...
Article
Full-text available
One of the main objectives for astrobiology is to unravel and explore the habitability of environments beyond Earth, paying special attention to Mars. If the combined environmental stress factors on Mars are compatible with life or if they were less harsh in the past, to investigate the traces of past or present life is critical to understand its p...
Article
Full-text available
The 2017 Surtsey Underwater volcanic System for Thermophiles, Alteration processes and INnovative concretes (SUSTAIN) drilling project at Surtsey volcano, sponsored in part by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), provides precise observations of the hydrothermal, geochemical, geomagnetic, and microbiological changes tha...
Article
Full-text available
Growth in sodium chloride (NaCl) is known to induce stress in non-halophilic microorganisms leading to effects on the microbial metabolism and cell structure. Microorganisms have evolved a number of adaptations, both structural and metabolic, to counteract osmotic stress. These strategies are well-understood for organisms in NaCl-rich brines such a...
Data
Principal Component Analysis (PCA) plot showing the multivariate variation among the three sample sets (control, NaCl stressed and MgSO4 stressed; n = 3) in terms of the obtained peaks.
Data
List of identified and putatively identified lipids. Metabolite levels for each experimental group are shown. Levels are expressed as mean peak intensity relative to the mean peak intensity of the control group. Numbers indicated in bold indicates statistically significance (p < 0.05).
Article
Full-text available
Four facultative anaerobic and two obligate anaerobic bacteria were isolated from extreme environments (deep subsurface halite mine, sulfidic anoxic spring, mineral-rich river) in the frame MASE (Mars Analogues for Space Exploration) project. The isolates were investigated under anoxic conditions for their survivability after desiccation up to six...
Article
Full-text available
The artificial mineralization of a polyresistant bacterial strain isolated from an acidic, oligotrophic lake was carried out to better understand microbial (i) early mineralization and (ii) potential for further fossilisation. Mineralization was conducted in mineral matrixes commonly found on Mars and Early-Earth, silica and gypsum, for 6 months. S...
Article
Full-text available
The limits of life of aerobic microorganisms are well understood, but the responses of anaero-bic microorganisms to individual and combined extreme stressors are less well known. Motivated by an interest in understanding the survivability of anaerobic microorganisms under Martian conditions, we investigated the responses of a new isolate, Yersinia...
Data
Results of the API R 20 A and Rapid ID 32 A tests. + Y. intermedia MASE-LG-1 metabolized the named substance; − Y. intermedia MASE-LG-1 did not metabolize the named substance. (DOCX)
Data
Dendrogram Y. intermedia MASE-LG-1. Neighbor-joining tree based on 16S rDNA sequences showing the phylogenetic position of Y. intermedia MASE-LG-1 related to 14 species of the genus Yersinia. DNA sequences were aligned using BioEdit. The dendrogram was constructed by using MEGA6. Bar: 0.01 substitutions per nucleotide position. (TIF)
Article
Full-text available
Astrobiology seeks to understand the limits of life and to determine the physiology of organisms in order to better assess the habitability of other worlds. To successfully achieve these goals we require microorganisms from environments on Earth that approximate to extraterrestrial environments in terms of physical and/or chemical conditions. The m...
Conference Paper
The concept of present and/or past extraterrestrial life is thrilling and tackled intensively throughout the last decades, yet remains notional. Some regions of extraterrestrial bodies (e.g. the Mars) are in general considered as habitable; however, are ruled by extreme physical and chemical variables, which constrain the possibility of life. Simil...
Conference Paper
Osmotic stress is one of the major limitations for cell growth. Microorganisms can evolve adaptations to abiotic stresses like high salt concentrations in the environment. Sensor and signal transduction networks provide information to the cell about the osmolarity of its surroundings leading to an immediate metabolic response to counteract the osmo...
Conference Paper
The search for traces of life is one of the principal aims of Mars exploration. Within the MASE project (Mars Analogues for Space Exploration) we work to improve approaches and methods for biomarker detection and extraction from Mars analogue sites. One promising strategy to study the preservation of biosignatures in Mars conditions consists of the...
Conference Paper
During the development of the Mars Analogues for Space Exploration project (MASE) several microbial isolates of the Tessaracoccus genus, a denitrifying actynomicetes, were obtained from enrichment cultures of samples from cores drilled at different depths in the Iberian Pyrite Belt. Some of these strains, isolates SSRT5 and SSRT8, were subjected to...
Chapter
Marine microbial biogeography describes the occurrence and abundance of microbial taxa and aims to understand the mechanisms by which they are dispersed and then adapt to their environment. The development of novel technologies, such as Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) in combination with large-scale ocean sampling campaigns, generated a vast amoun...
Chapter
In this chapter the current knowledge of the diversity of piezophiles isolated so far is reviewed. The isolated piezophiles originated from high-pressure environments such as the cold deep sea, hydrothermal vents, and crustal rocks. Several “stress” conditions can be experienced in these environments, in particular high hydrostatic pressure (HHP)....
Article
Full-text available
A novel hyperthermophilic, piezophilic anaerobic archaeon, designated as NCB100T, was isolated from a hydrothermal vent flange fragment collected in the Guaymas basin at the hydrothermal vent site named "Rebecca's Roost" at a depth of 1997 m. Enrichment and isolation were done at 100°C under atmospheric pressure. Cells of strain NCB100T are highly...
Article
Full-text available
We report here the complete sequence and fully manually curated annotation of the genome of strain Ch5, a new member of the piezophilic hyperthermophilic species Thermococcus barophilus .
Conference Paper
Life is a physico-chemical process by which tell-tale signals or traces are left on the environment. These signals are indicators of life and are known as biomarkers. Besides, the traces of some kinds of microorganisms can be well preserved, provided that they are rapidly mineralized and that the sediments in which they occur are rapidly cemented [...
Conference Paper
Introduction: The Life Detection System (LDS) is designed as a two modules system for microbial life detection under growing conditions. The microbes growth is followed by redox, pH and conductivity parameters but others parameters can be monitored as well if needed. The experiments presented in this paper follow the physicochemical parameter in a...
Conference Paper
MASE (Mars Analogues for Space Exploration) is a four year collaborative research project supported by an EC FP7 contract. Its aim is to understand how combined environmental stresses affect the habitability of a number of Mars analogue environments on Earth, specifically for anaerobic organisms. Crucial to assessing the habitability of any environ...
Conference Paper
The search for life beyond Earth is challenging and requires, as a prerequisite, intensive research on microbial life in similar, extreme environments on Earth. Mars analogue sites are characterised by e.g. anoxic conditions, organic compound limitation, low temperatures, high salinity or presence of oxidising compounds, and consequently represent...
Conference Paper
Assessing the habitability of Mars and detecting life, if it was ever there, depends on knowledge of whether the combined environmental stresses experienced on Mars are compatible with life and whether a record of that life could ever be detected. Many combinations of Mars relevant stress factors, such as high radiation dose rates and high UV uence...
Conference Paper
The MASE (Mars Analogues for space exploration) project intends to gain deeper insights into the habitability of Mars by searching for anaerobic extremophiles in Mars analogue environments on Earth like the cold sulfidic springs in Germany, the deep-subsurface salt mine in UK, the iron-rich Rio Tinto and the cold acidic lake Graenavatn in lceland....
Conference Paper
The MASE (Mars Analogues for Space Exploration) [1] project is a four-year collaborative research project supported by the European Commission Seventh Framework Contract. The aim of the project is to understand how combined environmental stresses influence the habitability of a number of Mars analogue environments in Europe and beyond. Field sites...
Conference Paper
Is life out there? In order to assess the habitability of Mars, which is (or has been) the most Earth-like planet in our Solar System, the first step is to investigate microorganisms thriving in terrestrial biotops with Mars similar conditions (0.13% O₂ in the atmosphere, low nutrients, low temperatures, high salinity and oxidising compounds, acidi...
Conference Paper
Astrobiology seeks to understand the limits of life and to determine the physiology of organisms in order to be able to better assess the potential habitability of other worlds and improve our ability to assay them for the presence of life. To successfully achieve this we require representative microorganisms from environments on Earth that in phys...
Article
Transcriptomes were analyzed for two related hyperthermophilic archaeal species, the piezophilic Thermococcus barophilus strain MP and piezosensitive Thermococcus kodakarensis strain KOD1 subjected to high hydrostatic pressures. A total of 378 genes were differentially expressed in T. barophilus cells grown at 0.1, 40 and 70 MPa, whereas 141 genes...
Article
Full-text available
Colonization of life on Surtsey has been observed systematically since the formation of the island 50 years ago. Although the first colonisers were prokaryotes, such as bacteria and blue–green algae, most studies have been focused on the settlement of plants and animals but less on microbial succession. To explore microbial colonization in diverse...
Article
Full-text available
Colonisation of life on Surtsey has been observed systematically since the formation of the island 50 years ago. Although the first colonisers were prokaryotes, such as bacteria and blue-green algae, most studies have been focusing on settlement of plants and animals but less on microbial succession. To explore microbial colonization in diverse soi...
Article
MASE is a collaborative, four-year research project supported by the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). This project started in January 2014 and its main objectives are to perform experimental studies to investigate how selected anaerobic microorganisms collected from Mars analogue sites on Earth respond to stress and fossiliz...
Article
Full-text available
Marinitoga piezophila KA3 is a thermophilic, anaerobic, chemoorganotrophic, sulfur-reducing bacterium isolated from the Grandbonum deep-sea hydrothermal vent site at the East Pacific Rise (13°N, 2,630-m depth). The genome of M. piezophila KA3 comprises a 2,231,407-bp circular chromosome and a 13,386-bp circular plasmid. This genome was sequenced wi...
Article
Full-text available
Thermococcus barophilus is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic, mixed heterotrophic, and carboxydotrophic euryarchaeon isolated from the deep sea hydrothermal vent Snakepit site on the mid-Atlantic ridge at a depth of 3,550 m. T. barophilus is the first true piezophilic, hyperthermophilic archaeon isolated, having an optimal growth at 40 MPa. Here we re...

Projects

Projects (5)
Project
The geothermal habitats of the Southern and Antarctic regions are unique biodiversity sanctuaries in very remote polar environments. They are located more than 3000 km from the first inhabited areas and are thus very little anthropized. More than 40 terrestrial and submarine geothermal sources with contrasting harsh physico-chemical conditions have been identified in these areas. The microbial communities they host remain unknown. These communities are likely shaped by their biogeographic position and the physicochemical parameters of the hot springs (temperature, pH, in situ chemistry) which probably exert a strong selective pressure on indigenous communities. Yet, these microbial communities probably represent a reservoir of diversity, functions and innovation. Like the endemic plant and animal populations of these regions, the microbial communities also require special attention for their protection and conservation. Following the example of what has been done for microbial communities in geothermal areas of Antarctica (ASPAs 140, 175), the aim of this project is to carry out a first comprehensive inventory of bacterial, archaeal, viral, microeukaryotic and fungal communities of the geothermal habitats of the Kerguelen and St. Paul islands, which are part of the French Southern and Antarctic Lands, and to predict the functions and adaptations encoded in their metagenomes and expressed in their metatranscriptomes. In this work, the distribution and compositional patterns of microbial communities, as well as the co-occurrence patterns of microorganisms from a wide range of geothermal sources will be studied and compared with each other and with those of similar geothermal environments, to get a first comprehensive snapshot of the microbial composition of these undisturbed communities and its functional potential, and in an attempt to determine the respective share of deterministic and stochastic processes explaining microbial community assembly. Cultivation and isolation attempts will be made for taxa belonging to branches of life yet without cultured representatives, in order to study their physiology and adaptations. Finally, emphasis will also be placed on microbial populations in thermal mineral springs with silica or carbonate deposits as they represent a key to understanding the primitive life forms on Earth and may also provide valuable information on extraterrestrial life forms in analogue environments
Archived project
IceSUSTAIN (Surtsey Underwater volcanic System for Thermophiles, Alteration processes and INnovative Concretes): A New Drill Core at Surtsey Volcano: A Natural Laboratory for Time-Lapse Characterization of Hydrothermal Seawater and Microbial Interactions with Basaltic Tephra – Iceland contribution IceSUSTAIN is the Iceland-based part of the SUSTAIN drilling program, a multidisciplinary international project bringing together over 40 scientists from 10 countries. The project focusses on the volcanic island of Surtsey, created by 1963–1967 basaltic eruptive activity within the southern offshore extension of the SE Icelandic volcanic rift zone. Two new drillholes are planned. One will extract a 210 m vertical core adjacent and parallel to the 180 m hole drilled in 1979 (Jakobsson & Moore 1986) and the other will extract a 300 m inclined core that further explores the volcanic edifice of Surtsey. The drilling will be complemented by analysis of the eruptive activity and geophysical surveys. Surtsey was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2008 (Baldursson & Ingadóttir 2007), and "has been protected since its birth, providing the world with a pristine natural laboratory.” It represents a world-class example of a rift zone volcano that has grown from the sea floor in historic time. The totality of the hydrothermally altered deposits of Surtsey can only be sampled by drilling. The drilling project will use the natural laboratory of the Surtsey tephra above and below sea level and interdisciplinary volcanological, microbial, geochemical, mineralogical, and geoarchaeological research programs to undertake scientific investigations situated within the larger International Scientific Continental Drilling Program (ICDP) research themes of hydrothermal seawater–rock interactions in rift zone volcanism, the succession of early microbial life, and the development of industrial resources using palagonitic tuff as a prototype for sustainable, high performance concretes. The principal scientific objective of new drilling of Surtsey is to describe how hydrothermal diagenetic and biogenetic seawater-rock processes evolve in an extremely well-constrained basaltic system that has great relevance to the growth, lithification, and longevity of rift zone islands, the processes of indigenous microbial colonization and succession in the subsurface geobiosphere, and the cementitious systems of concretes for waste encapsulations and harsh environmental application. Specific objectives of the microbiological part of the project are to explore how processes of chemosynthetic life evolve in extreme temperature conditions through coupled microbiological and pore fluid geochemical sampling and analysis during drilling, and through the eventual development of the "Surtsey Subsurface Observatory" (SSO) for monitoring, sampling and in situ experimental research describing the long term evolution of microbiological-seawater-rock-interactions. Microbial colonization of tephra, through studies of tephra and interstitial pore water that will increase our understanding of microbial origin, diversity and function in subsurface biospheres. The SSO will function as an important tool for future in situ fluid geochemical, microbiological and mineralogical experiments to evaluate the evolution of microbial reaction processes associated with microbiological-water-rock-interactions. A new core hole at Surtsey will provide insights into microbial subsurface dissemination and its role in basalt alteration (Santelli et al. 2009 Cockell et al. 2009), affirm if an indigenous microbial community exists, and examine its diversity.
Project
Using genomic, transcriptomic, genetic approaches, we aim to decipher the mechanisms of piezophily in T. barophilus