Pauline Ripat

Pauline Ripat
The University of Winnipeg · Department of Classics

About

15
Publications
4,430
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32
Citations
Citations since 2016
5 Research Items
19 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220123456
20162017201820192020202120220123456
20162017201820192020202120220123456

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Roman evidence for relations between sisters is thin, but what there is suggests that sororal relations were, like all familial relations, subject to ideals of behaviour that might be difficult for individuals to attain. Ideally, sisters, as almost interchangeable versions of each other, were supposed to offer each other unstinting and selfless sup...
Article
Full-text available
In this his article I explore the connections among the physiological effects of envy, the stereotypes that adhered to old women, and the literary representations of witches in Roman society, arguing that it is possible to get some perspective on healing methods employed by real female specialists.
Article
S. J.GREEN, DISCLOSURE AND DISCRETION IN ROMAN ASTROLOGY: MANILIUS AND HIS AUGUSTAN CONTEMPORARIES. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. Pp. viii + 225. isbn9780199646807. £50.00/US$74.00. - Volume 105 - Pauline Ripat
Chapter
This chapter examines a handful of curses that target female slaves or freedwomen. It hypothesizes that Roman wives may be behind these curses, as they seek to remove a servile rival from posing a threat to the wife's position in the household. The chapter's study highlights the fragile social status of wives; their privileged position in the house...
Article
Greek Divination - Johnston(S.I.)Ancient Greek Divination. Pp. xiv + 193, ills, map. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2008. Paper, £16.99, €23 (Cased, £50, €67.50). ISBN: 978-1-4051-1573-5 (978-1-4051-1572-8 hbk). - Volume 59 Issue 2 - Pauline Ripat
Article
In his latest book, Daniel Ogden turns his characteristic enthusiasm, meticulous energy, and command of the ancient sources to Lucian's Philopseudes. This dialogue, though well-mined by everyone from scholars of ancient magic to Goethe to Disney, has until now lacked an English-language commentary on its entirety. Ogden aims to fill this void in th...
Article
William Harris undertakes the daunting task of investigating the phenomenon of dreaming in antiquity—its forms, the claims made about it, its interpretations, its explanations, its credibility as a form of divination. Ancient dreaming is a subject for which “truth” is either generally unattainable or irrelevant (dreams are unlikely to be wholly “tr...
Article
Full-text available
The role divination played in allocating, maintaining, and justifying the authority of the senatorial élite in the Republic has been well established. Attention has also been paid to the use made of unofficial forms of divination by ambitious members of the ruling élite in the later Republic, who sought (often successfully) to make themselves pre-e...
Article
Full-text available
The language of oracular inquiries in Roman Egypt changed from Demotic to Greek because of the insistence of the Roman authorities, not, as historians have previously supposed, because of a preference for Greek on the part of priests or inquirers.
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Washington, 2003 Numerous questions put to oracles on papyri survive from Egypt. When considered as a corpus, these provide the opportunity to observe the extent to which religion entered into the Roman administration's relations with the provincial population. Divination had a long and politicized history in Rome. Ob...

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