Paul J Taillie

Paul J Taillie
University of Florida | UF · Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation

PhD

About

25
Publications
3,335
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234
Citations

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Full-text available
The effects of sea level rise and coastal saltwater intrusion on wetland plants can extend well above the high-tide line due to drought, hurricanes, and groundwater intrusion. Research has examined how coastal salt marsh plant communities respond to increased flooding and salinity, but more inland coastal systems have received less attention. The a...
Article
Disturbances such as fire play an important role in shaping forests and the wildlife they support. As such, forest managers employ prescribed fire to restore ecosystem function, promote forest biodiversity, and maintain wildlife habitat. To better understand how bats respond to variation in fire regime, we used acoustic recorders to quantify bat ac...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Over the gradually warming Holocene, many species’ range limits shifted poleward. However, some populations persisted in climate refugia, such as mountain tops. These climate relict populations are critical components of regional biodiversity, but their isolation renders them vulnerable to other threats, including changes in environmental condi...
Chapter
Wetlands have unique soil, vegetation, and biogeochemistry that arises from their landscape position and wetland hydrology, which creates low oxygen levels in the soil. With reduced oxygen availability, plants develop adaptations to survive, such as aerenchyma, that allow transport of atmospheric oxygen to their roots, and soil microbial communitie...
Article
Invasive predators have caused catastrophic declines in native wildlife across the globe. Though research has focused on the initial establishment, rapid growth, and spread of invasive predators, our understanding of prey resilience to established invasive predators remains limited. As a direct result of invasive Burmese pythons (Python molurus biv...
Preprint
Full-text available
The effects of sea level rise and coastal saltwater intrusion on wetland plants can extend well above the high-tide line due to drought, hurricanes, and groundwater intrusion. Research has examined how coastal salt marsh plant communities respond to increased flooding and salinity, but more inland coastal systems have received less attention. The a...
Article
Full-text available
As coastal land use intensifies and sea levels rise, the fate of coastal forests becomes increasingly uncertain. Synergistic anthropogenic and natural pressures affect the extent and function of coastal forests, threatening valuable ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration and storage. Quantifying the drivers of coastal forest degradation is...
Article
Full-text available
Coastal forests sequester and store more carbon than their terrestrial counterparts but are at greater risk of conversion due to sea level rise. Saltwater intrusion from sea level rise converts freshwater-dependent coastal forests to more salt-tolerant marshes, leaving 'ghost forests' of standing dead trees behind. Although recent research has inve...
Article
Wildlife is increasingly threatened by a suite of anthropogenic factors including climate change, habitat loss from human development, and invasive species. These threats are particularly pronounced on islands where species are more likely to go extinct. To better understand how native and invasive species on islands might respond to these threats,...
Article
Full-text available
Comprised of 17 named tropical storms, 6 of which were major hurricanes, the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season ranked as one of the most damaging and costly hurricane seasons on record. In addition to socio-economic impacts, many previous studies have shown that important coastal ecosystems like mangroves are shaped by severe storms. However, little i...
Article
Full-text available
As sea levels rise, low-lying coastal forests increasingly are subject to stressors such as inundation and saltwater exposure. At long timescales (for example, centuries), the extent of inundation and saltwater exposure will increase; however, on a decadal timescale, the role of these drivers may differ in both magnitude and direction. To investiga...
Presentation
Wetlands in the coastal plain of the southeastern United States are biodiversity hotspots that are vulnerable to ecosystem changes driven by increasing salinization due to more frequent storm surges and drought events. Salinization of freshwater wetlands is further exacerbated by human alteration of hydrologic flow. Our work aims to document the ch...
Article
Full-text available
The salinization of freshwater-dependent coastal ecosystems precedes inundation by sea level rise. This type of saltwater intrusion places communities, ecosystems, and infrastructure at substantial risk. Risk perceptions of local residents are an indicator to gauge public support for climate change adaptation planning. Here, we document residential...
Article
Full-text available
Rising sea levels dramatically alter the vegetation composition and structure of coastal ecosystems. However, the implications of these changes for coastal wildlife are poorly understood. We aimed to quantify responses of avian communities to forest change (i.e., ghost forests) in a low-lying coastal region highly vulnerable to rising sea level. We...
Article
Full-text available
One mechanism by which coastal marshes may persist as sea‐level rises is to expand landward into existing forest, a process known as marsh migration. Though recent studies highlight the importance of marsh migration to the conservation of birds associated with coastal marshes, marsh bird responses to this transition from forest to marsh are poorly...
Article
Full-text available
Obtaining sufficient numbers of detections during point counts to make inferences concerning the presence and abundance of secretive species, such as many species of marsh birds, can be difficult. However, autonomous recording units (ARUs) can provide extended survey windows, potentially allowing for more effective detection of elusive species. We...
Article
Full-text available
Non‐linear and interacting effects of fire severity and time since fire may help explain how pyrodiversity promotes biodiversity in fire‐adapted systems. We built on previous research on avian responses to fire by investigating how complex effects of burn severity and time since fire influenced avian community composition across the northern Sierra...
Article
Full-text available
A landscape-scale perspective on restoration ecology has been advocated, but few studies have informed restoration with landscape metrics or addressed broad-scale threats. Threats such as urban growth may affect restoration effectiveness in a landscape context. Here, we studied longleaf pine savanna in the rapidly urbanizing southeastern United Sta...
Article
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The primary objective for this study was to develop a comprehensive, high-resolution map of the distribution of Bachman's Sparrow (Peucaea aestivalis) in North Carolina. We reviewed aerial photography within the species' range to identify potential habitat and selected 1,511 locations to survey for sparrows. In addition, we compiled all historical...
Article
Full-text available
The primary objective for this study was to develop a comprehensive, highresolution map of the distribution of Bachman’s Sparrow (Peucaea aestivalis) in North Carolina. We reviewed aerial photography within the species’ range to identify potential habitat and selected 1,511 locations to survey for sparrows. In addition, we compiled all historical r...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research has shown that landscape-level changes, namely habitat loss and fragmentation, can play an important role in determining the distribution of species across a variety of ecological systems. However, the influence of these large-scale factors in relation to small-scale factors, such as local vegetation structure or composition, is poo...
Article
Black-backed woodpeckers (Picoides arcticus) are well-known to occur at higher densities in recently burned forests than they do in nearby green forests. In the forests of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA, there is relatively little information on the types of nest trees that these birds use in recently burned forests. From 2009 to 2011, we studi...

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