Paul Roberge

Paul Roberge
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill | UNC · Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures

PhD (1980)

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39
Publications
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203
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Introduction
Paul Roberge currently works at the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Paul does research in Philology, Historical Linguistics and Sociolinguistics. His most recent publication is "Germanic Contact Languages" (in press).
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (39)
Article
Full-text available
The Germanic languages are, as the phrase suggests, a group of languages that trace their origin to a common ancestor and constitute a branch of the Indo‐European language family. This chapter discusses the contact and history of Germanic languages, focusing on the prehistoric Germanic and the language contact after the breakup of Proto‐Germanic. I...
Article
Full-text available
'If we go back in time, the problem of what Afrikaans is becomes more and more difficult', wrote Valkhoff more than two decades ago (1972:2), and notwithstanding a far better understanding of the material facts, his words remain true today. In what follows I shall elucidate the sociolinguistic nature of the formation of Afrikaans at the Cape of Goo...
Article
In echoing a well-known title of some thirty-six years ago (Pike 1947), I do not wish to suggest that considerations of meaning and grammatical function have been excluded from the study of diachronic phonology. How to characterize the interface between phonology and morphosyntax across time has stimulated perennial debate, having commanded the att...
Article
In this essay I shall address some methodological issues concerning the reconstruction of variation in the early history of Afrikaans (roughly 1710-1840), with a view toward theorizing the mechanisms and sociolinguistic forces that underlie the formation of this language. Since discussions of the methodology of evaluating our Cape Dutch source mate...
Article
Full-text available
'If we go back in time, the problem of what Afrikaans is becomes more and more difficult', wrote Valkhoff more than two decades ago (1972:2), and notwithstanding a far better understanding of the material facts, his words remain true today. In what follows I shall elucidate the sociolinguistic nature of the formation of Afrikaans at the Cape of Goo...
Article
Two General Properties of Language: Variability and LabilityExplanationExplanation of a Nonfunctional KindFunction, Teleology, and PreferenceFunctionalismExplanation in Historical SociolinguisticsExplanation in MacrosociolinguisticsConclusion References
Chapter
The Germanic LanguagesNon-Indo-European Substratal InfluencesEuropa Vasconica et Semitica?Germanic Contacts with Finno-UgricLanguage Contact within the Northwest Indo-European SpreadLanguage Contact Following the Breakup of Proto-GermanicThe Migration Period (ca. 200–600 CE)The Projection of Norse and Norman Power (ca. 700–1100)SuperpositionYiddish...
Article
Language in Cape Town's District Six. By Kay McCormick. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. Pp. xvi, 256. Hardcover. £64/$154.00. - Volume 18 Issue 3 - PAUL T. ROBERGE
Article
In historical linguistics one may confront a feature that could plausibly have either an endogenous or contact origin. Lass (1997. Historical Linguistics and Language Change, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, p. 209) argues that if “the (informal) probability weightings of both source-types converge for a given character, then the choice goes...
Article
As a phenomenon to be explained, convergence in historical linguistics is substantively no different than in creolistics. The general idea is that accommodation by speakers of “established” languages in contact and the formation of new language varieties both involve a process of leveling of different structures that achieve the same referential an...
Article
Afrikaans linguistics suffered a major loss with the death of our colleague Carla Luijks, from cancer, on December 30, 2001, at the cruelly young age of 43 (two weeks shy of her 44th birthday).
Chapter
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Article
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One of the enduring cruxes in Afrikaans historical linguistics has been the origin of the so-called “double” or more properly “brace” negation, specifically with respect to the negative particle nie in sentence-final position. Though bipartite negation is well represented in the Germanic languages, the Afrikaans pattern stands alone. The brace nega...
Article
Historiese taalkunde: Studies oor die geskiedenis van Afrikaans. By RaidtEdith H.. Johannesburg: Witwatersrand University Press, 1994. Pp. xiv, 362. Hardcover. R70,00. - Volume 9 Issue 2 - Paul T. Roberge
Article
Argues that politicians have evoked and reinforced mythic views held by linguistically naive Afrikaaners regarding the origin and elaboration of Afrikaans, focusing on the merits of claims regarding certain linguistic attitudes that reflect an underlying cultural assumption that has remained deeply embedded in public consciousness. (60 references)...
Article
Full-text available
Thesis
This investigation seeks to achieve the following goals: (a) a deeper underst and ing of the interaction between morphology and phonology than is afforded by current linguistic models; (b) identification of the diachronic bases underlying the dephonologization of phonological processes; (c) development of a suitable linguistic theory, within which...
Article
Full-text available
Botha (2004:3) characterizes language evolution as a process comprising various phases, central to which are the first appearance of language in the human species and its subsequent development. It has been suggested that language phylogeny can be "seen" through the window of other processes by which linguistic objects are created. One may reasonab...

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