Paul S Muhle-Karbe

Paul S Muhle-Karbe
University of Oxford | OX

PhD

About

21
Publications
3,466
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371
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2011 - October 2015
Ghent University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (21)
Article
Full-text available
Extensive research has examined how information is maintained in working memory (WM), but it remains unknown how WM is used to guide behavior. We addressed this question by combining human electrophysiology (50 subjects, male and female) with pattern analyses, cognitive modeling, and a task requiring the prolonged maintenance of two WM items and pr...
Article
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) is important for guiding behaviour, but not always for the next possible action. Here we define a WM item that is currently relevant for guiding behaviour as the functionally “active” item; whereas items maintained in WM, but not immediately relevant to behaviour, are defined as functionally “latent”. Traditional neurophysiologi...
Preprint
Working memory (WM) is important for guiding behaviour, but not always immediately. Here we define a WM item that is currently relevant for guiding behaviour as the functionally ‘active’ item; whereas items maintained in WM, but not immediately relevant to behaviour, are functionally ‘latent’. Traditional neurophysiological theories of WM proposed...
Preprint
Full-text available
Extensive research has examined how information is maintained in working memory (WM), but it remains unknown how WM is used to guide behaviour. We addressed this question using a combination of electroencephalography, pattern analyses, and cognitive modelling with a task that required maintenance of two WM items and flexible priority shifts between...
Article
Cognitive flexibility is critical for intelligent behavior. However, its execution is effortful and often suboptimal. Recent work indicates that flexible behavior can be improved by the prospect of reward, which suggests that rewards optimize flexible control processes. Here we investigated how different reward prospects influence neural encoding o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Working memory (WM) is the ability to keep information online for a forthcoming task. WM theories have tended to focus on how sensory information is maintained, and less on how WM content is used for guiding behaviour. Here we ask if WM is supported by a transformation of sensory memoranda into task-sets that are optimised for task-dependent respon...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cognitive flexibility is critical for intelligent behaviour. However, its execution is effortful and often suboptimal. Recent work indicates that flexible behaviour can be improved by the prospect of reward, which suggests that rewards optimise flexible control processes. Here we investigated how different reward prospects influence neural encoding...
Article
Full-text available
The lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) plays a central role in the prioritization of sensory input based on task relevance. Such top-down control of perception is of fundamental importance in goal-directed behavior, but can also be costly when deployed excessively, necessitating a mechanism that regulates control engagement to align it with changing...
Article
Task preparation has traditionally been thought to rely upon persistent representations of instructions that permit their execution after delays. Accumulating evidence suggests, however, that accurate retention of task knowledge can be insufficient for successful performance. Here, we hypothesized that instructed facts would be organized into a tas...
Article
Full-text available
The inferior frontal junction (IFJ) area, a small region in the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), has received increasing interest in recent years due to its central involvement in the control of action, attention, and memory. Yet, both its function and anatomy remain controversial. Here, we employed a meta-analytic parcellation of the le...
Article
Full-text available
Weakening belief in the concept of free will yields pronounced effects upon social behavior, typically promoting selfish and aggressive over pro-social and helping tendencies. Belief manipulations have furthermore been shown to modulate basic and unconscious processes involved in motor control and self-regulation. Yet, to date, it remains unclear h...
Article
Full-text available
Cognitive control is thought to rely upon a set of distributed brain regions within frontoparietal cortex, but the functional contributions of these regions remain elusive. Here, we investigated the disruptive effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the human prefrontal and parietal cortices in task preparation at different abstract...
Article
Full-text available
In this commentary, we propose an extension of the associative approach of mirror neurons, namely, ideomotor theory. Ideomotor theory assumes that actions are controlled by anticipatory representations of their sensory consequences. As we outline below, this extension is necessary to clarify a number of empirical observations that are difficult to...
Article
Full-text available
Ideomotor theory states that the formation of anticipatory representations about the perceptual consequences of an action [i.e., action-effect (A-E) binding] provides the functional basis of voluntary action control. A host of studies have demonstrated that A-E binding occurs fast and effortlessly, yet little is known about cognitive and affective...

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