Paul Kroskrity

Paul Kroskrity
University of California, Los Angeles | UCLA · Department of Anthropology

Ph.D. Anthropology, Indiana U

About

75
Publications
18,507
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1,592
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
801 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Additional affiliations
July 1978 - present
University of California, Los Angeles
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Also served as Chair of the American Indian Studies for 26 years between 1985 and 2016.

Publications

Publications (75)
Article
This article explores the potent role of covert linguistic racisms as practices critical for maintenance and transmission of white supremacy (Spears 1999, 2020). Though most Whites benefit from the structural violence of white supremacy, many disclaim their belief in racial hierarchies or participation in racist projects. Though they reject overt r...
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This entry is an overview of the ubiquity and cultural variation associated with acts of naming especially involving personal names and place-names.
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Naming is one of the most ubiquitous and important activities that humans do with their languages. Every language provides lexical and grammatical resources that are then shaped by specific cultures to provide names for people, places, and culturally important activities and things. Names often take particular forms and are given in ways that are c...
Chapter
Full-text available
This is an overview chapter that reviews the history and development of the conceptual approach to language and power commonly referred to as "language ideologies". This article traces the development of a particular school of thought that is distinct from though related to work on "language attitudes" and CDA, or "critical discourse analysis". It...
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Based on original and long-term research in two ideologically divergent Native American linguistic communities, I want to demonstrate the surprising persistence of Indigenous language ideologies associated with multilingualism and how differences in these ideologies have manifested in divergent patterns of language shift and, more recently, in the...
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This article attempts to trace and understand the historical development and transformation of the regimes of language Indigenous to the Village of Tewa (northeastern Arizona). It examines the social institutions and cultural practices that first cultivated a particular set of language ideologies and linguistic practices in the precolonial period....
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Although the languages of Native North America and the linguistic communities that spoke these languages once provided the key data for American anthropology's early agenda under Boas, linguistic anthropologists continue their study in a manner inflected to contemporary political economic realities and theoretical concerns. One area of scholarship...
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Today the Village of Tewa, First Mesa of the Hopi Reservation in Northern Arizona experiences unprecedented linguistic diversity and change due to language shift to English. Despite a wide range of speaker fluency, the now emblematic Tewa language that their ancestors transported from the Rio Grande Valley almost 325 years ago, is widely valorized...
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The following is an introduction to this special issue on Ethnopoetics, Narrative Inequality, and Voice: The Legacy of Dell Hymes (Journal of Folklore Research 50/1–3, 2013).
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This article focuses on academic representations of Western Mono and Yokuts traditional narratives by exploring examples of what Dell Hymes described as “narrative inequality.” Further developing a notion of “discursive discrimination,” I demonstrate that the erasure and marginalization of indigenous narrative traditions was, in part, caused by the...
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), the discursive strategies of outside advocates for endangered languages (), and the representation of Nahuatl individuals as thoughtful yet constrained social actors from speech communities undergoing language shift (). Her work provides important precedents that enable readers to appreciate these speakers' “lived” experiences of their indigenou...
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This article explores the process of grammaticalization that has lead to the innovation of a distinct form of negation in Arizona Tewa, a Kiowa-Tanoan language spoken in the U. S. southwest. After reviewing comparative linguistic evidence that clearly establishes the innovative form of the Arizona Tewa negative, the analysis proceeds to examine eth...
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This study examines aspects of a morphological inverse construction in Arizona Tewa, a Kiowa-Tanoan language. This inverse is optional for configurations involving third person agents and patients and obligatory when the patient is a speech act participant. It is partially passivelike in that it makes patients subject-topics and demotes agents, as...
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DucheneAlexandre and HellerMonica (eds.), Discourses of endangerment: Ideology and interest in defence of languages. London: Continuum, 2007. Pp. x, 290. Hb $160.00, Pb $39.95. - Volume 38 Issue 4 - Paul V. Kroskrity
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This article examines an especially valorized genre of Arizona Tewa traditional stories, pééyu'u, by emphasizing ideologies of storytelling, narrative practices, and the indexical orders in which they are embedded. Tewa storytelling practices are culturally indexed to plant and human growth, to the moral development of children, and to the reproduc...
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OlsonDavid R. & ColeMichael (eds.), Technology, literacy, and the evolution of society: Implications of the work of Jack Goody. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. 2006. Pp. xxii, 358. Hb. $110.00. - Volume 38 Issue 3 - Paul V. Kroskrity
Article
As Edward Sapir once observed, "Our natural interest in human behavior seems always to vacillate between what is imputed to the culture of the group as a whole and what is imputed to the psychic organization of the individual himself " (1934:408). As a foundational figure for both the Americanist tradition in linguistics and for the field of lingui...
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Language and Ideology, vol. 2: Descriptive Cognitive Approaches. Rene Dirven. Roslyn Frank. and Cornelia Hie. eds. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 2001. vi. 267 pp.
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"The Hills confront far more than what is 'sayable' in terms of Mexicano grammar; they deal with what is actually said, with the relationship between Spanish and Mexicano as resources in the community's linguistic repertoire...One of the major studies of language contact produced within the past forty years." Language "The genius of this work is th...
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In recent years students of ethnopoetics (such as Dell Hymes and Dennis Tedlock) have explored alternative means of detecting and representing native principles of organization in verbal art. In particular considerable attention has been focused on whether syntactic and lexical criteria, on the one hand, or pause criteria, on the other, can be unde...
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This article offers a holistic approach to the understanding of Arizona Tewa passives by examining them from typological, genetic-historical, and areal-historical perspectives. Two types of functional passives, IMPERSONAL and SEMANTIC, are contrastively analysed in terms of their grammatical properties and discourse functions. Genetic-historical co...
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Vita. Thesis (Ph. D.)--Indiana University, 1977. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 279-293). Photocopy. s

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