Paul Innes

Paul Innes
United Arab Emirates University | UAEU · College of Humanities and Social Sciences

PhD Shakespeare's Sonnets

About

34
Publications
2,447
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9
Citations
Introduction
I was an English Literature undergraduate at the University of Glasgow and wrote my Ph.D on Shakespeare's Sonnets at Stirling University. After academic positions in Poland and Scotland I became Head of Department and Professor of Shakespeare Studies at the University of Gloucestershire. In 2021 I joined the United Arab Emirates University as Professor of English. My research focuses on literary and critical theory and discourses about the emergence of the British Empire.
Education
October 1986 - May 1991
University of Stirling
Field of study
  • Shakespeare's Sonnets
September 1982 - May 1986
University of Glasgow
Field of study
  • English Literature

Publications

Publications (34)
Chapter
Early modern tragedy was a glorious hybrid, a variegated collection of texts and performances reflecting a wide range of models and influences—some classically inspired, emerging from learned traditions and mythological adaptations; some native-born out of folktales, biblical narratives, ballads, legends, and other forms from popular culture—and so...
Chapter
Antony and Cleopatra is among Shakespeare's most enduringly popular tragedies. A theatrical piece of extraordinary political power, it also features one of his most memorable couples. Both intellectually and emotionally challenging, Antony and Cleopatra also tests the boundaries of theatrical representation. This volume offers a stimulating and acc...
Article
In Much Ado About Nothing, characters repeatedly stage moments designed to confuse other figures, a good example being the machinations aimed at Beatrice and Benedick. However, the play contains many more instances in which misrepresentation plays with truth. The supposed offstage seduction of Hero signals the audience that what this unseen (to the...
Book
Tracing epic from its ancient and classical roots through postmodern and contemporary examples this volume discusses a wide range of writers including Homer, Vergil, Ovid, Dante, Chaucer, Milton, Cervantes, Keats, Byron, Eliot, Walcott and Tolkien. Offering new directions for the future and addressing the place of epic in both English-language text...
Chapter
Featuring contributions by established and upcoming scholars, Shakespeare and the Translation of Identity in Early Modern England explores the ways in which Shakespearean texts engage in the social and cultural politics of sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century translation practices. Framed by the editor's introduction and an Afterword by Ton Hoe...
Book
The Continuum Shakespeare Dictionaries provide authoritative yet accessible guides to the principal subject-areas covered by the plays and poetry of Shakespeare. The dictionaries provide readers with a comprehensive guide to the topic under discussion, its occurrence and significance in Shakespeare's works, and its contemporary meanings. Entries ra...
Article
The article discusses the use of minor characters in the theatrical production "Cymbeline" by William Shakespeare as a silent chorus for the events of the story. Editors have speculated that a Spaniard and Dutchman present in a scene in the play were intended to be more important characters. The author suggests the nationality of the characters may...
Book
This book makes Shakespeare accessible to a new generation of students as well as general readers interested in the subject. It makes no assumptions about prior knowledge of the plays and poems and places them in their historical context, thus making it easier for the reader to understand what the Bard meant in his works.
Book
This book is an analysis of the sonnet in the English Renaissance. It especially traces the relations between Shakespeare's sonnets and the ways in which other writers use the form. It looks at how the poetry fits into the historical situation at the time, with regard to images of the family and of women. Its exploration of these issues is informed...
Chapter
The disjunctions I traced in Chapter 1 criss-cross the terrain of the sonnet, making it a site of contestation. Familial ideology and the place of the woman in relation to sonnets led me to a questioning of practices of representation. This area itself needs further exploration, and so I shall now touch upon the relations between Renaissance theori...
Chapter
In this chapter I intend to trace the relations between the friend, whose unstable position was traced out in the previous chapter, and the poetic persona of the sonnets. I do not want to reinscribe authorial presence in the poems. Far from it; what I will be looking at is the way in which the persona is socially constructed, through associations w...
Chapter
The two previous chapters should be taken as the context within which Shakespeare’s sonnets are produced. The term ‘context’ is actually rather weak here: it is hardly adequate to the complex ways in which his poems interact with the various issues I have traced in relation to the sonnet. This movement is not simply an intertextual phenomenon, in a...
Chapter
It has not been possible in this book for me to pay attention to all of the possible permutations of the use of the sonnet in the English Renaissance. This is why I have concentrated on Shakespeare’s sonnets, as a way of suggesting further investigations into what is a very difficult area, to say the least. I have not included sections on writers s...
Chapter
The ideal sonnet practitioner strove to achieve a balance between innovation and the constraints imposed by a tight form. Or at least, this is how it tended to be seen in the English Renaissance. In this respect it should not be surprising that the form is inscribed with a potential for change in many different ways, although it may start out with...

Projects

Project (1)