Paul P. Hesse

Paul P. Hesse
Macquarie University · Department of Environmental Sciences

About

116
Publications
22,183
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Introduction
Paul Hesse currently works in the Department of Environmental Sciences, Macquarie University. Paul does research in Geomorphology and Paleoclimatology. His current project is 'INQUA Dunes Atlas Chronologic Database.'
Additional affiliations
September 1994 - January 2015
Macquarie University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (116)
Article
In this communication we present Uranium-Thorium (U-Th) isotope data for surficial dusts sampled along a west to east transect in eastern Australia and some selected bedrock samples from the Flinders Ranges near the western end of the transect. The dusts have lost ²³⁸U and ²³⁴U within the last 350 kyr implying a combination of chemical (bulk U loss...
Article
Proxy records from across the Southern Hemisphere show significant local to regional scale variability in climatic and environmental conditions during late Marine Isotope Stage 3 and early Marine Isotope Stage 2, prior to the global last glacial maximum (LGM; 26.5–19.0 kyr). Although not necessarily synchronous across the hemisphere, the regional s...
Preprint
OCTOPUS v.2 is an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant web-enabled database that allows users to visualise, query, and download cosmogenic radionuclide, luminescence, and radiocarbon ages and denudation rates associated with erosional landscapes, Quaternary depositional landforms and archaeological records, along with ancillary geospatial (ve...
Article
Studying the role of vegetation in regulating aeolian sediment transport is complicated by the diversity of plant geometry and spatial distribution. Using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) surveys of four partially vegetated sand dunes in the Simpson Desert, this study explored statistical associations between vegetation and the location and quantity o...
Article
Full-text available
Este trabajo presenta los resultados de los estudios arqueológicos llevados a cabo en el sitio Casas Grandes, realizados dentro de un proyecto de investigación regional que abarca las nacientes de la Quebrada de Humahuaca en su intersección con la Puna, ecotono y umbral geo-ambiental que ocurre en este sector de la Provincia de Jujuy, Argentina. Se...
Article
Medium resolution satellite-derived fractional cover estimates of bare soil (fBS), photosynthetic vegetation (fPV), and non-photosynthetic vegetation (fNPV) provide a powerful means to study arid ecosystem dynamics. This paper employed remote sensing estimates of fPV and fNPV from five case study sites from Australia's vegetated dunefields to obser...
Article
Full-text available
Eolian mineral dust is an active agent in the global climate system. It affects planetary albedo and can influence marine biological productivity and ocean‐atmosphere carbon dynamics. This makes understanding of the global dust cycle crucial for constraining the dust/climate relationship, which requires long‐term dust emission records for all major...
Article
Dust plays important roles in the environment, and there has been much interest in the formation, provenance, and age of the world’s dust deposits. Ongoing debates are concerned with the importance of glacial grinding versus eolian abrasion and fluvial transport in the formation of silt-sized particles. Short-lived uranium-series isotopes afford ne...
Chapter
The wind is an important agent of sediment movement and landform development in deserts and some coastal environments today. In line with major climate changes affecting earth history, the extent and locations of wind-shaped landscapes have changed over time. For the Quaternary period, these changes have commonly left a record in the landscapes of...
Article
In this paper we present a deep learning (U‐Net) based workflow for classifying linear dune landforms based on the discrete Laplacian convolution of a new global elevation dataset, the AW3D30 Digital Surface Model. Crest vectors were then derived for landscape pattern analysis. The U‐Net crest classification model was trained and evaluated on sampl...
Article
The formative mechanisms of linear (longitudinal) dunes and dunefields remain uncertain, and multiple hypotheses have been proposed. A central debate is the degree to which dunes act as along-dune sediment transport corridors, implying that dunes grow primarily by extension, or whether they are comprised of locally-derived sands moved from adjacent...
Article
Full-text available
Floodplain wetland ecosystems respond dynamically to flooding, fire and geomorphological processes. We employed a combined geomorphological and environmental proxy approach to assess allochthonous and autochthonous macro-charcoal accumulation in the Macquarie Marshes, Australia, with implications for the reconstruction of fire regimes and environme...
Article
The stable longitudinal dunes in the northern Simpson Desert, Australia, were observed in satellite imagery to become more active after vegetation cover was reduced by fire and drought. Subsequent rainfall events also resulted in significant vegetation regrowth and dune stabilisation. These switches between more active and stable conditions have no...
Chapter
Sand seas are the fullest expression of aeolian landscapes, being so extensive that only the dunes themselves are visible from their interior. This chapter discusses all very large dunefields, regardless of their apparent activity. As wind‐blown bed forms, dunes necessarily require winds above some threshold, but the global distribution of dunes an...
Article
This study derives a new function describing the relationship of channel bankfull discharge (Qbf) to channel width in modern rivers of the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) of southeastern Australia and applies this to dated palaeochannels of seven rivers to quantify late Quaternary discharge history in this important basin. All rivers show high MIS3 and...
Article
Full-text available
Reconstructing how rivers respond to changes in runoff or sediment supply by incising or aggrading has been pivotal in gauging the role of the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) as a geomorphic driver in the Himalayas. Here we present new chronological data for fluvial aggradation and incision from the Donga alluvial fan and the upper Alaknanda River, as...
Article
Palaeochannels of lowland rivers provide a means of investigating the sensitivity of river response to climate-driven hydrologic change. About 80 palaeochannels of the lower Macquarie River of southeastern Australia record the evolution of this distributive fluvial system. Six Macquarie palaeochannels were dated by single-grain optically stimulated...
Preprint
A bolide that impacted NW Australia during the Late Quaternary left a circular depression more than 100 m deep and nearly a kilometer in diameter, with a crater rim ~30 m above the regional terrain. The resultant crater is a window into the regional water table. The surface of the contemporary central pan is 25 m below the adjacent terrain, coincid...
Article
A key skill that geomorphologists possess is the ability to use multi‐scale perspectives in their interpretations of landscapes. One way to gain these perspectives is with the use of nested hierarchical frameworks. In fluvial geomorphology, such frameworks help with assessment of large‐scale controls (e.g., tectonic activity, climate change) on the...
Article
This study aims to determine the common response of coastal sand dunes in Western Australia (WA) to fire on decadal time-scales, in terms of ecological-geomorphic-climatic interactions to test the hypothesis that fire plays a role in coastal dune destabilisation. Fires are commonly suggested to have contributed to widespread dune reactivation in Au...
Article
Fire is commonly listed as a contributing disturbance to dune re-activation. This paper aims to characterise post-fire disturbance to vegetation and soil surface, and aeolian activity on coastal dunes. Field data were collected in February 2016 at two sites on coastal dunes near Esperance, Western Australia (WA) after recent wildfires in November 2...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In order to quantify how fast a landscape responds to tectonic, climatic and human factors, accurate weathering rates and soil and/or sediment ages are required. The uranium-series (U-series) isotopes are a valuable tool for deriving the timescales of weathering and erosion processes. The impact of dust on calculated U-series isotope residence time...
Article
The relationship between antecedent precipitation, vegetation cover and sand movement on sand dunes in the Simpson and Strzelecki Deserts was investigated by repeated (up to four) surveys of dune crest plots (≈25 × 25 m) over a drought cycle (2002–2012) in both winter (low wind) and spring (high wind). Vegetation varied dramatically between surveys...
Article
Dust affects Earth's climate, ecology and economies across a broad range of scales, both temporally and spatially, and is an integral part of the earth's climate system. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of inland lake beds to dust emissions both locally and globally. This study aims to explore the relative volumetric importance of e...
Article
The controls on the evolution of linear dunefields are poorly understood, despite the potential for reactivation of dunefields, which are currently stabilized by vegetation, under the influence of 21st century climate change. The relative roles of local influences (i.e. boundary conditions) and morphodynamic influences (i.e. emergent properties) re...
Conference Paper
We are compiling a global digital map of inland sand dune systems worldwide from published and unpublished sources, supplemented by manual digitizing of additional sand seas and dune fields. The digital database is compiled in ArcGIS, allowing mapping at scales from global to local. It contains spatial information on dune fields and sand seas rangi...
Article
Full-text available
The INQUA Dunes Atlas project has developed a global digital database of chronological information for periods of inland or continental sand dune accumulation and stabilization. The database comprises information on the site location (including coordinates), dune type, and stratigraphic context, pertinent analytical information (e.g. luminescence p...
Article
Full-text available
Changing climate conditions affect dust emissions and the global dust cycle, which in turn affects climate and biogeochemistry. In this study we use observationally-constrained model reconstructions of the global dust cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum, combined with different simplified assumptions of atmospheric and sea ice processing of dust-b...
Article
In the context of static conservation reserves, dynamic fluvial processes and patterns of river channel and floodplain change are problematic for environmental management. Floodplain wetlands that evolve by erosion and sedimentation experience changes in the location and extent of channels and wetlands regardless of conservation reserve boundaries....
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The INQUA Dunes Atlas project has developed a global digital database of chronologic information for periods of desert sand dune accumulation and stabilization. The database currently contains 3278 luminescence and 535 radiocarbon records of directly dated periods of aeolian sand deposition from 1200 inland dune locations throughout the world, most...
Article
Full-text available
clim-past-discuss.net/10/4277/2014/ doi:10.5194/cpd-10-4277-2014 © Author(s) 2014. CC Attribution 3.0 License. This discussion paper is/has been under review for the journal Climate of the Past (CP).
Article
Full-text available
Of the two nanocrystal (magnetosome) compositions biosynthesized by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB), the magnetic properties of magnetite magnetosomes have been extensively studied using widely available cultures, while those of greigite magnetosomes remain poorly known. Here we have collected uncultivated magnetite- and greigite-producing MTB to dete...
Presentation
To advance the use of longitudinal dunes as ‘geoproxies’ of late Quaternary environmental change, a greater understanding of several aspects of dune geomorphology and its response to climate is required. One key control on dune activity is vegetation cover, which stabilizes dune sediments and reduces wind velocity. Vegetation cover appears to be pr...
Conference Paper
The supply, transport and deposition of fine-grained sediment are important factors determining the morphology of lowland rivers that experience channel breakdown and have wetlands on their lower reaches. Sediment supply and residence time determine whether reaches accumulate sediment (wetland areas) or erode sediment (channelised areas). This rese...
Conference Paper
Anthropogenic impacts on hydrology and sediment supply are recognized as leading factors contributing to change in many rivers and wetlands. However it is difficult to distinguish between key causes and forms of channel adjustment in fluvial systems where intrinsic geomorphic processes lead to change on a timeframe similar to that of human disturba...
Article
This paper presents a meta-analysis of 689 luminescence age estimates of Australian desert sand dunes. This analysis had two aims: to examine the hypothesis that Quaternary climate changes have forced dune accumulation, and to understand longitudinal dune behaviour from the age-architecture of sand dunes for which stratigraphic information is often...
Article
The sustainability of soil resources is determined by the balance between the rates of production and removal of soils. Samples from four weathering profiles at Frogs Hollow in the upper catchment area of the Murrumbidgee River (southeastern Australia) were analyzed for their uranium-series (U-series) isotopic composition to estimate soil productio...
Article
Full-text available
The Australian region spans some 60° of latitude and 50° of longitude and displays considerable regional climate variability both today and during the Late Quaternary. A synthesis of marine and terrestrial climate records, combining findings from the Southern Ocean, temperate, tropical and arid zones, identifies a complex response of climate proxie...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we synthesise existing palaeoenvironmental data from the arid and semi-arid interior of the Australian continent for the period 40–0 ka. Moisture is the predominant variable controlling environmental change in the arid zone. Landscapes in this region respond more noticeably to changes in precipitation than to temperature. Depending on...
Article
Full-text available
The management of the water resources of the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB) has long been contested, and the effects of the recent Millennium drought and subsequent flooding events have generated acute contests over the appropriate allocation of water supplies to agricultural, domestic and environmental uses. This water-availability crisis has driven d...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides an incisive review of paleoclimate science and its relevance to natural-resource management within the Murray-Darling Basin (MDB). The drought of 1997–2010 focussed scientific, public and media attention on intrinsic climate variability and the confounding effect of human activity, especially in terms of water-resource managemen...
Article
There are vast dry areas in Australia, but few loess sections have been reported. Mackenzie's Waterholes Creek (MWC) profile in New South Wales was the deepest and first dated loess profile. In this paper, various measurements of magnetic parameters from MWC were carried out and comparison was made with those of Luochuan profile, which lies in the...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Floodplain wetlands consist of landforms with distinct geomorphology and spatial distribution linked to hydrology, fluvial processes, sediment and post-depositional changes. However, relationships between these landforms and contemporary inputs of sediment, organic matter and nutrients, with their impacts on wetland ecology, are difficult to quanti...
Article
Independent dating evidence and dune morphology indicate great stability of the Australian dunefields. Most dunefields have seen only minor superficial modification since they were formed, up to 1 million years ago, despite quite large changes in climate conditions. This stability may be partly due to the relatively dense vegetation cover on Austra...
Article
Paleoecological responses to coupled geomorphic and hydrological changes have rarely been studied using a multiproxy approach in freshwater floodplain wetlands of semiarid Australia. The Macquarie Marshes are a large, multi-channelled and morphodynamic floodplain wetland system in the lowland interior of the Murray-Darling Basin, southeastern Austr...
Article
Full-text available
To understand environmental responses to climate change and to human activity, we need to constrain the rates of processes that shape the Earth’s surface like the production of soils by physical and chemical weathering of rocks and the transport of sediments. These processes are controlled either directly or indirectly by climate change. Studying t...
Article
A new map, the first based on interpretation of satellite imagery, reveals both the complexity of Australia's dunefields and their relationships with topography, climate and substrate. Of the five main sand seas, the Mallee, Strzelecki and Simpson in eastern Australia cover Quaternary sedimentary basins whereas the Great Victoria and Great Sandy du...
Article
Full-text available
Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) is a very common mineral at the earth’s surface and also an important material for making music and video tapes. Maghemite is usually synthesized from magnetite under oxidizing conditions after a few hours or a few days below a temperature of 300°C. The magnetic property of thermal instability and the chemical action after heati...
Article
Floodplain wetlands and floodouts in the Macquarie Marshes are fed by numerous anastomosing and distributary channels on the lower reaches of the Macquarie River, southeastern Australia. River discharge is seasonally and annually variable and is affected by both interannual and interdecadal climatic trends, related to ENSO and IPO. A downstream com...
Article
As climate is changing rapidly, there is an increasing need to understand how water and soil resources respond to climate change. Soil and sediment dynamics are sensitive to several external factors such as climate, vegetation type and distribution, human activity, and tectonic activity. However, the relationship between erosion and changes in thes...
Article
Palaeo-dust records in sediments and ice cores show that wind-borne mineral aerosol ('dust') is strongly linked with climate state. During glacial climate stages, for example, the world was much dustier, with dust fluxes two to five times greater than in interglacial stages. However, the influence of dust on climate remains a poorly quantified and...
Article
Full-text available
To understand environmental responses to climate change and to human activity, we need to constrain the rates of processes that shape the Earth’s surface like the production of soils by physical and chemical weathering of rocks and the transport of sediments. These processes are controlled either directly or indirectly by climate change. Studying t...
Article
The Macquarie River of eastern Australia is an inland draining perennial system whose lower reaches flow across a large, low-gradient alluvial plain without tributary input. Failure of the Macquarie to sustain its channelled meandering course results in channel breakdown and the development of a broad distributary pattern characterised by a network...
Conference Paper
Intensive water resource developments and landuse changes within semi-arid zone floodplain wetlands have added to the heavy burden of agricultural and environmental stressors on inland rivers in Australia. In particular, in-channel and floodplain structures, such as weirs, embankments and canals, serve to impede, trap, divert, spread and/or convey...
Conference Paper
Channel and floodplain morphodynamics are driven by intrinsic sedimentation and erosion processes in many lowland-dryland rivers of the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia. Sites of avulsion and floodout tend to occur in the distal reaches of these rivers, where new channels are formed and others may be abandoned, or where channels become discontinuous...
Article
Uranium isotopes can be used to determine the residence time of sediments in a catchment, i.e. how long they are stored in weathering profiles and transported through the catchment by rivers. We have measured uranium isotopes in sediments from palaeo-channels of the Murrumbidgee River (Murray-Darling Basin, southeastern Australia) to quantify varia...
Article
Full-text available
The magnetic susceptibility (MS) of Chinese loess showing a general proportional relationship to pedogenic grade has been widely recognized and used for reconstruction of paleoclimate by Quaternary scientists. The in-situ pedogenic enhancement of ferrimagnetic content is normally believed to be the main reason for the increase of susceptibility in...
Conference Paper
The Macquarie Marshes (147°30’E 31°S) occupy the lower reach of the Macquarie River in south-eastern Australia and typify the distinctive Holocene style of many rivers in inland Australia. The river decreases in discharge and capacity downstream before finally breaking down into a complex arrangement of distributary channels and marshes in which th...
Article
Short-term (contemporary) and long-term denudation rates were determined for the Blue Mountains Plateau in the western Sydney Basin, Australia, to explore the role of extreme events (wildfires and catastrophic floods) in landscape denudation along a passive plate margin. Contemporary denudation rates were reconstructed using 40 years of river sedim...
Article
We use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System at a 50 km spatial resolution to explore the impact of large-scale vegetation changes on the Australian monsoon. We simulate multiple Januaries using vegetation cover representative of the present day, the last interglacial (LIG) (125,000 BP) and the last glacial maximum (20,000 BP), interpreted from...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, much research on modern and palaeotsunami deposits has been published. From these studies, a range of signature types has been identified. Identifying and dating such deposits is an important element in understanding late-Holocene tsunami hazard and risk. However, important questions such as, ‘do modern and palaeotsunami leave simi...
Article
Longitudinal (linear) sand dunes of the Simpson and Strzelecki dunefields in eastern central Australia present a paradox. Low levels of activity today stand in contrast to luminescence dating which has repeatedly shown deep deposits of sand on dune crests dating to within the late Holocene. In order to investigate the nature of dune activity in the...
Article
The degree to which Southern Hemisphere climatic changes during the end of the last glacial period and early Holocene (30-8 ka) were influenced or initiated by events occurring in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere is a complex issue. There is conflicting evidence for the degree of hemispheric ‘teleconnection’ and an unresolved debate as...
Article
The Australian continent is characterised by an extremely variable surficial geochemistry, reflecting the varied lithology of Australian basement rocks. Samples representative of Australian aeolian dust have been collected in (1) regions where meteorological records, satellite observation and wind erosion modelling systems have indicated frequent d...