Paul Henman

Paul Henman
The University of Queensland | UQ · School of Social Science

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93
Publications
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Publications

Publications (93)
Article
Full-text available
Government webportals are central to governments' web strategy. They are designed to be nodal hubs, or gateways, for encountering government, and as such position government in the online world. Yet the designs of government webportals, particularly their location within wider web ecologies are scarcely studied. In additional to these web ecologies...
Conference Paper
Government web portals are central to governments' web strategy, yet their rationale, design and effectiveness is scarcely studied. This paper comparatively examines the hyperlink structure of the government web portals of Australia, Canada, France, UK and USA. Websites are conceptualized as operating within web and informational ecologies in which...
Article
Webportals - websites that operate as front doors or guides into government on the web - are central to government web strategy and presence. However, little is known about their success in enabling people to quickly and accurately access public sector information and services. In these days of Google and generic web search engines, government webp...
Article
Governments across the world have been developing and adopting new digital technologies for about a half of a century to support policy making and service delivery processes. Yet, until recently minimal critical attention has been given to this phenomenon and how it is transforming government. This paper reviews recent research on new and emerging...
Article
Full-text available
Nowadays, the web offers a world of choice, providing millions of options at the click of a button. Web-based platforms such as Amazon.com and Yelp.com provide users with a range of tools and functionalities to navigate and compare options within a complex and bewildering landscape of choice. Whilst such websites afford users the feeling of objecti...
Article
This opening paper outlines the rise of public sector performance measurement and performance governance from New Public Management, its trajectory from an administrative tool for organisational monitoring and management, to its insertion into service performance and accountability, to a policy tool defining policy itself. Four key conceptual ways...
Article
Performance measurement has an implicit performance theory embedded within its practice; performance measurement perforce performs. Performance measurement has a performative effect on performance. Drawing together and building on the various empirical observations from the preceding papers in this collection, this concluding paper firstly examines...
Article
Disability reform in Australia centres on a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), which aims to provide lifelong, individualised support based on the principle of 'reasonable and necessary' care. As a universal rights-based scheme it represents a historical shift in allocation principles in Australia's disability policy. Nonetheless, attenti...
Article
A range of institutional and financial instruments has been used to drive population health outcomes in primary health care in Australia. However, GP sovereignty and the corporatized nature of general practice have generated major challenges. The core of government reform strategy since 1992 has been the creation and financing of Primary HealthCare...
Article
In many developed countries, the provision of disability services has undergone significant transformations, from institutional to community based care, and from oganisational to personalised funding. Yet delivering disability support remains an ongoing challenge for governments. Specifically, the relative success of different types of disability s...
Article
Performance measurement (PM) in the public sector has progressively broadened to cover the operation of professionals traditionally framed as independent and autonomous. How PM reconstitutes the role and conduct of professionals is critical for understanding contemporary dynamics of policy and governance, and service provider–service user relations...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this article was to evaluate the conceptual framework that was proposed by conductinga scoping study. From the extant literature, this study identified several factors related to an individual's use of e-government services. In addition, previous studies showed that there are different patterns of use of e-government services, particular...
Technical Report
The Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) is a survey conducted with all Australian university graduates within 12 months after completing a university degree qualification. It assesses a graduate’s overall experience and assessment of their university and program of study. As such it acts as a form of performance assessment of teaching in the Aust...
Article
This publication contains current research and analysis on a broad range of issues topical to Australia's social policy and its administration.
Article
Full-text available
Using a case study of push-model Freedom of Information (FOI) regimes in Australia, which require the administrative release of government information unless contrary to the public interest, this paper develops a typology of essential literacy relating to access to information in the digital environment. To achieve this aim, the research: Conducted...
Article
How to stimulate student interest in social policy, while reinforcing its professional significance for social work, remains an understudied topic. This paper reports an evaluation of a teaching intervention that sought to enhance student interest in social policy by: more explicitly connecting social policy with professional social work practice;...
Article
Internationally, over the past two decades the theme of personalisation has driven significant reforms within health and social care services. In the Australian context, the principles of ‘entitlement based on need’ and ‘personalisation’ frame the proposed National Disability Long-Term Care and Support Scheme (LTCSS). In this article, we critically...
Article
Full-text available
Chronic pain is a commonly reported problem in primary care, and is Australia's third most costly health problem. Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of pain, many people with chronic pain do not receive the best available care. This paper examines the health care experiences of people with chronic pain and focuses discussion on the...
Article
Web 2.0 technologies, denoted by their formation of social networks and the co-production of web content by users, have rapidly entered social and economic activities. Internationally, governments are racing to identify ways to utilize Web 2.0 in government. In addition to government reports and taskforces, there is a proliferation of business advi...
Article
The concept of housing affordability has a central role in Australian housing research. The dominant approach to defining and measuring housing affordability has been the ratio approach. This Essay explores the potential advantages of greater use of residual measures of housing affordability as a supplement to the ratio approach for Australian hous...
Article
Governments throughout the world are increasingly making use of new forms of ‘conditional’ public and social policies. While some policies have always been conditional, for example through means-testing, these new policies are notable for making a benefit or service in one policy domain conditional on a situation or behavior in another policy domai...
Article
Full-text available
This paper outlines the methodology of budget standards, then proposes adjustments to make it more suitable for analysis of housing affordability. The model's usefulness is evaluated through application to two policy questions. The first is a comparison of the relative financial hardship faced by a range of target groups for social housing. Secondl...
Article
Governments are rapidly reconfiguring their activities and services in order to make use of the opportunities provided by the internet and new information and communication technologies (ICTs). This paper draws on Foucault’s account of various forms of governmental power to dissect and interrogate emerging e-government forms, as evidenced in reform...
Article
The Road-to-Where? The politics and practice of welfare-to-work conference was held in Brisbane from July 17-18, 2006 and was organised by the Social Policy Unit, School of Social Work and Applied Human Sciences, The University of Queensland. The aim of the two day conference was to critically examine the new welfare-to-work policies that took effe...
Article
This chapter considers the implications of computerisation for procedural justice in social security. It outlines an approach to the analysis of administrative justice-defined as the justice inherent in routine administrative decision making-that is derived from Jerry Mashaw's pioneering study Bureaucratic Justice. This approach explains the prevai...
Article
Sweeping changes to the Australian Child Support Scheme were recently introduced, featuring a dramatically different system for the calculation of child support. The reforms were intended to respond to ongoing concerns about equity and changes in social expectations and practices in gender, work and parenting. The extent to which the new Scheme is...
Article
"This book provides rare insights into the nature of contemporary, technologically-facilitated government. Its multidisciplinary approach demonstrates that information technology is more than a tool for politicians and policy-makers. E-government has reconfigured public administration, policy, power and citizenship"--Provided by publisher.
Article
The paper is a collection of three reports on the costs of children in Australian families: 'The estimated costs of children in Australian families in 2005-06'; 'Updated costs of children using Australian budget standards; and 'Costs of children and equivalence scales: a review of methodological issues and Australian estimates'. The research was co...
Chapter
This chapter, and those following, distil the observations about the contribution of ICTs to the changing nature of government as evidenced in the case studies presented in Part II and projected more broadly. While the Australian case studies provide the basis for the observations outlined in Part III, it is hoped that readers will be able to appre...
Chapter
Time is a precious commodity. We are stressed by the many deadlines and competing demands for our time. As a result, people are often harried by the contemporary pace of life. While technologies such as mobile phones, email and personal organisers promise a means to manage time stresses, their use inevitably and ironically contributes to the subjec...
Chapter
Having examined in the previous chapter the role of e-government in a key government area of expenditure, social security, I turn now to the examination of e-government in the operations of government financing, namely taxation. Historically, taxation has been a definitive and indeed foundational feature of the modern nation state and, more recentl...
Chapter
Power has been a topic of long-standing debate about the impact of computerisation. Advocates of the use of ICTs in government have often imagined the technologies heralding in a new era of democratisation, citizen participation and the flattening of power, whereas others have equally worried that the technologies will bring about greater centralis...
Chapter
In the next three chapters the use of e-government in three different policy domains is examined: welfare, taxation and health. Each chapter begins with an overview of the key policy, administrative and technological transformations and pressures which have occurred in that policy domain across OECD countries. After the international overview, the...
Chapter
How should the role of technology in the conduct of government be understood? This is the question that this chapter sets out to address. In building the book’s conceptual approach to technology and/in government, the chapter starts with the ways in which technology has typically been envisioned in government. For the most part, it is invisible. Go...
Chapter
In the previous chapter I presented a conceptual understanding of the role of technology in the practice of government. That framework utilises first, Heidegger’s phenomenology of tools, and secondly adopts Foucault’s notion of government as the ‘conduct of conduct’, thereby pointing beyond the institutions of the State to governing practices. In t...
Chapter
Health is the third policy domain in which e-government case studies were conducted. Like welfare and taxation, health is also a major element of government in both the level of money flows and the impact on citizens. Unlike taxation, which is largely bureaucratic in nature, health covers the range from bureaucratic management of health policies an...
Chapter
Speaking publicly about the contributors to the global financial crisis of 2008–10, the appointed head of the Australian Treasury, Dr Ken Henry, noted firstly the contribution of ‘complexity’: The array of financial instruments deployed within the global financial system has become so complex that it defies understanding. It is not just that nobody...
Chapter
According to several social theorists, our contemporary world is marked by networks, so much so that both Jan van Dijk ([1991] 2006) and Castells (1996) coin ours a ‘network society’, or at least argue that we are on the path towards one. Electronic ICTs play a central element in both their accounts. Networked ICTs reveal the world as networks and...
Chapter
As with the previous chapter, this chapter investigates the contribution of e-government to the way social issues are perceived, the governmental rationalities in which public policies are framed, and the very substance and form of public policy. The previous chapter demonstrates how networked e-government has helped to install the ‘new conditional...
Chapter
The history and evolution of governing and the state is inextricably entwined with the history and evolution of what we might retrospectively call ‘information and communications technologies’ (ICTs). From the invention of writing in ancient Sumeria, to the deployment of surveys, paper files and filing cabinets in Victorian bureaucracies, to global...
Article
This chapter examines the contribution of information communication technology (ICT) to the operation of social and public policy. The governmentality analytic is introduced as a way in which to highlight how ICT is used by the state in governing populations. The chapter identifies four ways ICTs relate to social and public policy. First, social po...
Article
Governments are increasingly introducing new conditions for the receipt of social benefits and services. Such conditions represent a discontinuity from previous conditional policies. This "new conditionality" is notable in its linking of two previously separate social policy domains. Workfare - that is, the linking of income support to employment a...
Article
Over the last decade, the spatial or geographical nature of social and economic indices has proliferated. It is well understood that there are geographical variations in prices, particularly housing prices. What we do not know is relative wages - that is, given a wage in one place, what is the wage to attain the same standard of living in another p...
Article
Electronic surveillance has grown rapidly in recent years. Despite this, surveillance practices and their social products are yet to receive serious attention in the academic field of social policy. Extending Titmuss' classical articulation of the social division of welfare, this article develops the notion of the social division of welfare surveil...
Chapter
As this quote from Hollywood illustrates, choice is one means by which we come to define our own self. Our expression of our preferences through choice enables us to distinguish ourselves from others who have different choices and preferences. In this way, choosing provides us with the freedom to define our individuality. But to see our choice of S...
Chapter
How might we think about the nature of welfare reform and its administration? This chapter, and this book more generally, argue that an understanding of welfare reform cannot be achieved without reference to its administration. Welfare administration is the very locus in which the operation and effect of policy is defined and governmental power rel...
Chapter
This authoritative yet accessible book identifies the key targets for intervention through a detailed exploration of pathways and processes that give rise to health inequalities. It sets this against an examination of both local practice and the national policy context, to establish what works in health inequalities policy, how and why.
Chapter
The implementation and ongoing administration of policies is long regarded as a key factor in the success or failure of public policies. Furthermore, many studies (for example, Mashaw, 1983; Lipsky, 1980; Clarke et al, 2000; Clarke and Newman, 1997) have demonstrated that the way in which public policy is administered significantly contributes to t...
Book
While reforms of welfare policies have been widely analysed, the reform of welfare administration has received far less attention. Using empirical case studies, this book provides significant new insights into the way welfare administration is being internationally transformed. Particular attention is given to the effect on welfare clients, staff a...
Article
While reforms of welfare policies have been widely analyzed, the reform of welfare administration has received far less attention. Using empirical case studies, this book provides significant new insights into the way welfare administration is being internationally transformed. Particular attention is given to the effect on welfare clients, staff,...
Article
Networked information and communication technologies are rapidly advancing the capacities of governments to target and separately manage specific sub-populations, groups and individuals. Targeting uses data profiling to calculate the differential probabilities of outcomes associated with various personal characteristics. This knowledge is used to c...
Article
Although computer technology is central to the operation of the modern welfare state, there has been little analysis of its role or of the factors shaping the way in which it is used. Using data generated by expert informants from 13 OECD countries, this paper provides an indicative comparison of the aims of computerization in national social secur...
Conference Paper
This paper examines how electronic data exchange networks are enabling and constituting conditional policies, whereby a person's eligibility in one policy domain becomes contingent on their behaviour in another. It is argued that the growth of these policy directions must be understood as a result of both the growth of a neo-liberal political ratio...
Article
Targeting is increasingly used to manage people. It operates by segmenting populations and providing different levels of opportunities and services to these groups. Each group is subject to different levels of surveillance and scrutiny. This article examines the deployment of targeting in Australian social security. Three case studies of targeting...
Article
This paper critically examines some aspects of the discursive and material transformation of government as a result the deployment of the internet and new information technologies. Particular attention is given to the constitution of partnerships and network forms of governing. The paper illustrates the dynamics of e-government through two case stu...
Article
New information and communication technologies (ICTs) feature strongly in the Australian government’s strategic visions for the provision of health care and services. In these ‘e-health’ strategies ICTs are presented as powerful tools that progressively improve the delivery of quality health care and health outcomes, particularly for those living i...
Article
Recent welfare state developments have emphasized the structure, administration and governance of service delivery. In critically examining these developments, this article advances a governmentality approach to the welfare state that highlights the significance of technology in contributing to the nature and practices of the welfare state. Based o...
Article
In this paper we analyse the interactive relationship between technology, administration and policy in social security. Focusing on new and emerging information and computing technologies, we show how they have been shaped and adopted by social security institutions in different countries, and explore their differential impact on recipients and sta...
Article
Computer modeling technologies have increasingly become part of the conduct of science, public policy making, and the practice of politics. Their contribution to the world can be understood as intellectual, scientific, forecasting, governmental, truth production, and political technologies. This article focuses on the ways in which computer modelin...
Article
In Australian welfare reform debate, a range of approaches and policies has been advocated. Regardless of their diversity, I argue that the debate has an unnecessarily narrow framework resulting from the widespread acceptance of at least three welfare reform myths. First, is the idea that the current system is anachronistic and in disrepair. lnstea...
Article
On 29 September 1999, the then Australian Minister for Family and Community Services, Senator the Honourable Jocelyn Newman, announced during a National Press Club Speech a major review of Australia’s social security system (Newman 1999a). The key reason given in this speech and in the subsequent Government Discussion Paper for the need for policy...
Article
Recent developments in information technology have been accompanied by concerns involving public policy and government service delivery. Calls are made for social policy to address an apparent digital divide, for public policy to encourage technological innovation in the new information society, and for government service delivery that uses new tec...
Article
Procedural justice, which refers to the fairness of the process of decision making, is contrasted with substantive justice, which refers to the fairness of the outcomes. Extending the work of Mashaw, it is argued that there are six normative models of procedural justice: bureaucracy, professionalism, legality, managerialism, consumerism and markets...
Article
Most Western countries have, for some time, provided income support and/or taxation relief to parents with children in their care. The significant amount of research into the costs of children to couple and sole parent households has been important in assessing and developing family support policies. Changing societal expectations about the level o...
Article
Attempts to establish the extent to which the use of computers in Australia’s Department of Social Security (DSS) has facilitated changes in social security policy and its administration. Bases findings on case studies relating to two new DSS policies, supplemented with documentary evidence. Identifies that computers are used in the DSS for six mai...
Article
The absence of considerations of technology in policy studies reinforces the popular notion that technology is a neutral tool, Through an analysis of the role played by computers in the policy processes of Australia's Department of Social Security, this paper argues that computers are political players in policy processes, Findings indicate that co...
Article
Building upon recent work in philosophy of technology which argues that technology has,neither a neutral nor a determining but a 'texturing' effect upon society, this paper presents the world-view embodied in computers as an analytic device for exploring the ways in which computers texture the use environment. It interprets previously identified ef...
Article
To establish the costs of contact, the authors used data from a recent Australian survey on expenditures during contact to modify existing 'budget standards' research on the costs of children in Australia. Whilst the budget standards research has been criticised by some for possibly overestimating the costs of living, the validity or otherwise of t...
Article
This publication contains research and analysis on a broad range of issues topical to Australia's social policy and its administration.

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