Paul Hanly

Paul Hanly
National College of Ireland · School of Business

PhD in Economics

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70
Publications
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (70)
Article
Full-text available
The inclusion of productivity costs can affect the outcome of cost-effectiveness analyses. We estimated the value of cancer premature mortality productivity costs for Europe in 2020 using the Human Capital Approach (HCA) and compared these to the Friction Cost Approach (FCA). Cancer mortality data were obtained from GLOBOCAN 2020 by sex and five-ye...
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PurposeUnderstanding how patients and families experience, respond to, and cope with the financial burden associated with cancer could assist in identifying future research priorities and developing relevant interventions to assist patients and families facing financial hardship. This systematic review offers a synthesis of the qualitative evidence...
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Background Economic cost estimates have the potential to provide a valuable alternative perspective on the COVID-19 burden. We estimate the premature mortality productivity costs associated with COVID-19 across Europe.Methods We calculated excess deaths between the date the cumulative total of COVID-19 deaths reached 10 in a country to 15th May 202...
Article
When someone dies prematurely from cancer this represents a loss of productivity for society. This loss can be valued and provides a measure of the cancer burden. We estimated paid and unpaid productivity lost due to cancer-related premature mortality in 31 European countries in 2018. Lost productivity was estimated for all cancers combined and 23...
Article
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Objectives The friction cost approach (FCA) is one way to estimate lost productivity, which considers the time taken to replace an employee, known as the friction period. The friction period may be influenced by local labour market conditions, limiting the relevance of international FCA estimates. The objective was to estimate the time and costs of...
Article
Objectives A key criticism of applying the friction cost approach (FCA) to productivity cost estimation is its focus on a single friction period. A more accurate estimate of the friction cost of worker absence requires consideration of the chain of secondary vacancies arising from the opening of a new primary vacancy. Currently, empirical evidence...
Article
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Introduction Early death from cancer is potentially preventable. In developing countries, it is not only a human tragedy but also an economic tragedy. In Latin America and the Caribbean, the estimated number of deaths for people 15–64 years in 2018 was 262,141, with Brazil being the country with the largest number of cases in the region (38.2%). Th...
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Introduction Premature mortality affects the economy directly due to the loss of productivity of individuals who die, thus ceasing to contribute economically to the country. The one-third reduction in premature mortality (30–69 years) from chronic noncommunicable diseases is goal 3.4 of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDG). Alt...
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PurposeFinancial toxicity related to cancer diagnosis and treatment is a common issue in developed countries. We seek to systematically summarize the extent of the issue in very high development index countries with publicly funded healthcare.Methods We identified articles published Jan 1, 2005, to March 7, 2019, describing financial burden/toxicit...
Article
Background Cervical cancer is a preventable disease, vaccination and screening for precursor lesions are effective primary prevention measures. Some developed countries aim to eradicate it in the near future. In Brazil, there is still a need for progress in cervical cancer control. Using the human capital approach, we estimate how much cervical can...
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Background The Sustainable Development Goal 3.4 has a target of 1/3 reduction in premature mortality (30-69 years) from chronic noncommunicable diseases. Although cancer is a chronic disease, it comprises more than 100 different conditions, with different risk factors and prognosis. This study aimed to calculate current and predicted premature mort...
Article
The friction cost approach (FCA) estimates the productivity costs of disease from an employer’s perspective but the lack of estimates of friction periods in different countries limits its use. Our aim was to use labour market aggregates to generate two alternative estimates of the friction period for European countries and to apply the FCA to illus...
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e13614 Background: Premature mortality affects the economy directly due to the loss of productivity of individuals who decease, thus ceasing to contribute economically to the country. The 1/3 reduction in premature mortality (30-69 years) from chronic noncommunicable diseases is goal 3.4 of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). Although cance...
Article
7068 Background: One method of calculating indirect costs of cancer is the analysis of productivity loss. Using the human capital approach, we estimate how much cancer-related premature mortality indirectly impacts the economy. Given the diverse causes of cancer death and sociodemographic profiles in Brazil, we estimated lost productivity due to ca...
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Background Standardised integration of productivity costs into health economic evaluations is hindered by equity and distributional concerns. Our aim was to explore the distributive impact of productivity cost methodological variation, describing the consequences for different groups. Methods 527 prostate cancer survivors (2–5 years post-diagnosis...
Article
Positive social and psychological appraisals may help maintain well-being in illness, but few studies have systematically investigated this in a European context. After controlling for sociodemographic, health and objective social factors, we employed multilevel regression modelling to establish if appraisals predict well-being in three illness gro...
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Purpose This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of sleeping problems in prostate cancer survivors and to explore the role of predisposing, precipitating and perpetuating factors in this process. Methods Using a cross-sectional design, 3348 prostate cancer survivors between 2 and 18 years post diagnosis reported experiences of insomnia using...
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Purpose The burden of caring for a family member or friend can have a negative impact on caregiver health and well-being, yet caring can also have positive consequences. Understanding the factors that may enhance caregiver well-being is merited. Methods We used data gathered from the European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS). Using complete case anal...
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Objective To estimate the prevalence of financial objective stress and subjective strain among colorectal cancer survivors and assess associated financial coping factors in Ireland which has a mixed public‐private healthcare system. Methods Colorectal cancer survivors were identified from the National Cancer Registry and a sample of 496 respondent...
Article
Objective: Despite a generally good prognosis many prostate cancer survivors have poor quality of life (QOL). A greater understanding of how psychological appraisals influence QOL is merited given their potentially modifiable nature. In this study we considered how elements of survivors' retrospective and prospective appraisals relate to QOL. Met...
Article
Background: Over two-thirds of the world's cancer deaths occur in economically developing countries; however, the societal costs of cancer have rarely been assessed in these settings. Our aim was to estimate the value of productivity lost in 2012 due to cancer-related premature mortality in the major developing economies of Brazil, the Russian Fed...
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Background: The financial impact and consequences of cancer on the lives of survivors remain poorly understood. This is especially true for colorectal cancer. Objective: We investigated objective cancer-related financial stress, subjective cancer-related financial strain, and their association with health-related quality of life in colorectal ca...
Article
Purpose: To explore the effect that treatment-related commuting has on carers of patients with head and neck cancer. Method: Semi-structured interviews, thematically analysed, with 31 carers. Results: Treatment-related commuting had a considerable impact on carers of patients with head and neck cancer, both in practical terms (economic costs,...
Article
Measures of economic output captured by traditional national account metrics emphasise the importance of paid work over unpaid work which can lead to inefficient policy decision making. We utilise Irish census data to measure the economic value of informal care in Ireland. Our results reveal the considerable value of informal care in Ireland rangin...
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Purpose: Cancer places a significant cost burden on health services. There is increasing recognition that cancer also imposes a financial and economic burden on patients but this has rarely been quantified outside North America. We investigate out-of-pocket costs (OOPCs) incurred by colorectal (CRC) survivors in Ireland. Methods: CRC survivors (...
Article
Background: Fear of recurrence (FOR) is a primary concern for both cancer survivors and their caregivers, yet little is known about what care-related factors exacerbate this worry. Objectives: This study aimed to establish the role of care-related stressors-as distinct from survivor characteristics-in predicting FOR in head and neck cancer careg...
Article
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The extant literature suggests that cancer-related premature mortality costs have increased over time and are projected to increase further. Previous studies have generally employed a societal rather than an employer-based costing framework. A question therefore remains over the magnitude of productivity costs associated with premature death from c...
Article
Background From a health service perspective, informal care is often viewed as a potentially cost-effective way of transferring costs out of the formal healthcare sector. However, informal care is not a free resource. Objective Our objective was to assess the impact of alternative valuation methods and key assumptions on the cost of informal care....
Article
Objective: Fear of recurrence (FOR) is a key concern among survivors of all cancers. In prostate cancer, FOR varies with health and treatment type, but little is known about how survivors' appraisals of their treatment, and in particular their level of regret over treatment decisions, may affect this. Methods: 1229 prostate cancer survivors betw...
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Background When individuals stop working due to cancer this represents a loss to society – the loss of productivity. The aim of this analysis was to estimate productivity losses associated with premature mortality from all adult cancers and from the 20 highest mortality adult cancers in Ireland in 2011, and project these losses until 2030. Methods...
Article
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Purpose Our study aimed to investigate the relationship between unmet supportive care needs and carer burden and happiness, in head and neck cancer (HNC). Methods Two hundred eighty-five HNC informal carers were sent a postal questionnaire between January and June 2014, which included the supportive care needs survey for partners and caregivers of...
Article
Aims and objectives: To identify and describe the triggers of emotional distress among long-term caregivers (more than 1 year postdiagnosis) of people with head and neck cancer. Background: Limited research has been conducted on the factors that cause head and neck cancer caregivers to become distressed. Design: Qualitative cross-sectional. M...
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Cancer is the second leading cause of death in Ireland accounting for approximately 30% of all deaths. Of these, almost a third arise in those of working age. As well as the public health burden, cancer also imposes economic costs on society in general and employers in particular. This study measured the productivity costs associated with cancer-re...
Article
Full-text available
When people die due to cancer, their contribution to society through paid work, called production, is lost. Previous estimates of cancer-related lost production have focussed on developed countries. However, developing nations account for approximately 70% of the world’s annual cancer deaths. We estimate the value of lost productivity due to cancer...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background: When people die due to cancer, their contribution to society through paid work, called production, is lost. Previous estimates of cancer-related lost production have focussed on developed countries. However, developing nations bear a high burden of cancer, accounting for approximately 70% of the world’s annual cancer deaths. The aim of...
Article
The friction cost approach (FCA) has been proposed as an alternative to the human capital approach for productivity cost valuation. However, FCA estimates are context dependent and influenced by extant macroeconomic conditions. We applied the FCA to estimate colorectal cancer labor productivity costs and assessed the impact of a changing macroecono...
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Radiotherapy provides significant benefits in terms of reducing risk of local recurrence and death from rectal cancer. Despite this, up-to-date cost estimates for radiotherapy are lacking, potentially inhibiting policy and decision-making. Our objective was to generate an up-to-date estimate of the cost of traditional radiotherapy for rectal cancer...
Article
Previous studies suggest that productivity losses associated with head and neck cancer (HNC) are higher than in other cancers. These studies have only assessed a single aspect of productivity loss, such as temporary absenteeism or premature mortality, and have only used the Human Capital Approach (HCA). The Friction Cost Approach (FCA) is increasin...
Article
Every cancer-related death in someone of working age represents an economic loss to society. To inform priorities for cancer control, we estimated costs of lost productivity due to premature cancer-related mortality across Europe, for all cancers and by site, gender, region and country. Cancer deaths in 2008 were obtained from GLOBOCAN for 30 Europ...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose Our aim was to investigate associations between the subjective burden of care and health-related quality of life (both physical and mental) within colorectal cancer patient carers in Ireland, with supplementary analysis of carer objective factors. Methods Two hundred twenty-eight colorectal cancer informal carers were sent a postal questio...
Article
Worldwide, 8.2 million people die of cancer annually. Cancer has a significant societal impact, impinging on countries' economic health. We reviewed methodological aspects, and the main cost results, of studies calculating premature mortality losses from cancer published 2000-2013 and identified gaps in the evidence-base. Thirty-one studies were id...
Article
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Most measures of the cancer burden take a public health perspective. Cancer also has a significant economic impact on society. To assess this economic burden, we estimated years of potential productive life lost (YPPLL) and costs of lost productivity due to premature cancer-related mortality in Ireland. All cancers combined and the 10 sites account...
Article
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Purpose: Cancer treatment is increasingly delivered in an outpatient setting. This may entail a considerable economic burden for family members and friends who support patients/survivors. We estimated financial and time costs associated with informal care for colorectal cancer. Methods: Two hundred twenty-eight carers of colorectal cancer surviv...
Article
BACKGROUND: Fecal DNA (fDNA) testing is a noninvasive potential alternative to current colorectal cancer screening tests. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review and quality assessment of studies of cost-effectiveness of fDNA as a colorectal cancer screening tool (compared with no screening and other screening modalities), and identified key va...
Article
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Background A societal perspective in economic evaluation necessitates that all resources associated with a disease or intervention should be valued; however, informal care time costs are rarely considered. Objective We estimated time allocated to care by informal carers of colorectal cancer survivors; and investigated the impact of applying alterna...
Article
Objective: We investigated patterns and costs of lost productivity due to colorectal cancer in Ireland and examined how rising pension ages affect these costs. Methods: Data from a postal survey of colorectal cancer survivors (6 to 30 months after diagnosis; n = 159), taken from March 2010 to January 2011, were combined with population-level sur...
Article
Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide with over 1 million new cases diagnosed each year. Advances in treatment and survival are likely to have increased lifetime costs of managing the disease. Cost-of-illness (COI) studies are key building blocks in economic evaluations of interventions and comparative effec...
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Conferences and meetings are a prerequisite in the modern global economy and can contribute substantially to national income and foreign exchange earnings. This study assesses the economic contribution of the international association conference market to Ireland and highlights key sectors that demonstrate strong multiplier effects. Primary confere...
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Objectives: The European Code Against Cancer recommends individuals aged ≥50 should participate in colorectal cancer screening. CT-colonography (CTC) is one of several screening tests available. We systematically reviewed evidence on, and identified key factors influencing, cost-effectiveness of CTC screening. Methods: PubMed, Medline, and the Coch...
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The potential of the convention market to generate economic activity is dependent on the strength of its interindustry linkages with the rest of the economy. These economic linkages vary between countries. Using input-output analysis, this study examines the linkages of the Irish international association convention market with the rest of the econ...
Article
Productivity costs constitute a substantial proportion of the total societal costs associated with cancer. We compared the results of applying two different analytical methods--the traditional human capital approach (HCA) and the emerging friction cost approach (FCA)--to estimate breast and prostate cancer productivity costs in Ireland in 2008. Dat...
Article
The monetary contribution of inbound North American tourism to the Irish exchequer is economically substantial, generating more tourist revenue earnings per capita in Ireland than visitors from any other country. The purpose of this paper is to present a macroeconometric analysis of North American tourist expenditure in Ireland, thus providing an i...

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