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Paul C. Buckland

Paul C. Buckland
Independent Researcher · None

PhD

About

214
Publications
70,736
Reads
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4,612
Citations
Citations since 2016
39 Research Items
1399 Citations
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Introduction
Paul Buckland graduated in geological sciences and archaeology from the University of Birmingham, where he subsequently completed a doctorate in Quaternary entomology. He has taught in the universities of Birmingham, Sheffield, Bristol and Bournemouth, and is currently a self-employed technician specialising in work with fossil insects.
Additional affiliations
October 2011 - December 2011
Umeå University
Position
  • visiting lecturer
September 2008 - May 2010
Bournemouth University
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • Sacked for refusing to accept the fixing of examination results, see http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/7332452/The-university-professor-who-stood-up-against-dumbing-down-of-degrees.html
January 1991 - December 2003
The University of Sheffield

Publications

Publications (214)
Article
Full-text available
Of the 24 Greenland interstadials in the Last Glacial-interglacial cycle (LGIC) only five are conventionally recognised in Britain. This paper aims to improve understanding of the LGIC in Britain from a site at Arclid, Cheshire. Sediments were characterised and luminescence used to establish a chronology. This found that the Chelford Sand Formation...
Article
Final report on excavations on Roman pottery kiln sites at Cantley, S Yorks.
Article
Full-text available
Separation of females of two very similar species of the Carabid genus Agonum.
Technical Report
Full-text available
Inkle Moor adjoins Thorne Moors NNR to the west. The report lists identifications of invertebrates made during a survey in 2013.
Article
Recent global changes have triggered a biodiversity crisis. However, climate fluctuations have always influenced biodiversity and humans have affected species distributions since prehistoric times. Conservation palaeobiology is a developing field that aims to understand the long-term dynamics of such interactions by studying the geo-historical reco...
Preprint
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In the absence of any published substantial Late Roman groups from Doncaster or the surrounding region, it was decided to make the sequence from the 'dark earth' on Site DS available with an extended commentary. Essentially the sequence extends downwards from 1.
Preprint
Full-text available
Draft copy for comment. Pottery report also available
Article
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The Roman sites in Edlington Wood, three miles west-southwest of Doncaster, South Yorkshire, first came to wider notice as a result of finds by the woodman in the 1930s and the material was of sufficient interest for Philip Corder to use it as the basis for a paper in a festschrift to O. G. S. Crawford. Most of these finds and later material were d...
Data
Originally published in 1991 (Buckland & Coope, 1991), this is the most comprehensive bibliography of articles and books on Quaternary fossil insects and their use in palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology and environmental archaeology available on the planet. Updates are periodically posted here, at www.bugscep.com, and on other open resources.
Article
Full-text available
While there is extensive evidence for the Late Devensian, less is known about Early and Middle Devensian (approx. 110-30 ka) climates and environments in the UK. The Greenland ice-core record suggests the UK should have endured multiple changes, but the terrestrial palaeo-record lacks sufficient detail for confirmation from sites in the British Isl...
Preprint
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Chapter
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Write up of excavations in Doncaster, NE of the parish church, in 1967
Article
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Prehistoric field systems sometimes encompass excavated, pit‐like features which are difficult to classify due to the complex stratigraphies resulting from reuse, infilling and collapse. They are frequently classified as wells and watering holes, but other potential uses for excavated depressions are rarely cited. We argue the need for environmenta...
Preprint
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Comment on the state British Universities intended for relevant journal
Preprint
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Three hundred and three Roman coins were recovered in the course of the excavations described in this Volume. Or these fourteen were from two hoards; one of seven siliquae from Site DA, the other of seven late-second-to early-third-century copper-alloy issues from Site DC. These are described and assessed in their respective site reports and are no...
Preprint
Full-text available
The lack of funding for the research on the Doncaster Roman fort excavations means that section will be written when PCB can find the time between other work. In addition some sections written many years ago will be successively revised and made available on this site. The introduction, last revised ten years ago is appended.
Preprint
Full-text available
The 1966-7 rescue excavation in St George Gate, Doncaster, provided the first full section across the later Roman enclosure ('fort') wall. An underlying pit, which later research search indicates was associated with a larger fort provided a pottery and small find assemblage of Flavian date. A coin of AD71 provided a terminus post quem for the group...
Article
Palaeoecological investigations of a rapidly eroding coastal midden and an adjacent peat bog on the island of Kangeq in southwest Greenland have provided new information on environmental change and human impact associated with Thule Inuit occupation. Palynological and palaeoentomological datasets have been produced through the 14th to the 17th cent...
Article
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Quaternary geology of Lindholme in the middle of Hatfield Moors, South Yorkshire, and adjacent areas.
Article
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Although there are several well preserved Viking boat burials from Norway, until recently palaeoecological research on their context has often been limited. Research on fossil insect remains in particular can provide valuable forensic information even in the absence of an actual body. Here we present archaeoentomological information from a boat bur...
Preprint
Full-text available
Draft of the Roman small finds report
Article
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Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire is often considered a well-preserved ancient landscape, subsequently having survived by way of centuries of management as a hunting preserve. Archaeological evidence suggests otherwise, with an enclosed landscape beginning in the pre-Roman Iron Age and continuing through the Roman period. Due to the nature of the...
Article
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The Neolithic and the spread of agriculture saw several introductions of insect species associated with the environments and activities of the first farmers. Fossil insect research from the Neolithic lake settlement of Dispilio in Macedonia, northern Greece, provides evidence for the early European introduction of a flightless weevil, the granary w...
Article
In 1992 two Middle Neolithic adult skeletons were excavated by South Yorkshire Archaeological Services from beneath a rock overhang at Scabba Wood (SE527019), near Sprotbrough, within one of the valleys north of the Don Gorge. In 1994, the Yorkshire Archaeological Society’s Doncaster branch carried out a geophysical survey of a rectangular enclosur...
Data
An updated compilation of all published papers on Quaternary insect fossils, including Chironomidae and archaeological ones.
Article
Full-text available
The impact of insect species directly associated with man-made habitats and human dispersal has been, and remains globally significant. Their early expansion from their original niches into Europe is intrinsically related to discussions of climate change, origins of domesticated plants and animals, the spread of agriculture and infectious diseases....
Article
Full-text available
Farm outbuildings on the edge of Hatfield Moors, since demolished, showed construction of alternating bands of one or two header courses of handmade bricks separating three to four courses of rounded cobbles of varying sizes. The method of construction, utilising boulders and cobbles cleared from fields, was once widely used in the region and the s...
Article
Excavation of the latest surviving structures of the villa at Batten Hanger in West Sussex indicates that a large aisled building was demolished in the late fourth or fifth century and replaced by a large hall 31.6 m long by 11.5 m wide, orientated approximately east–west. The survival of pad stones shows this space to have been divided into seven...
Article
Full-text available
The limits of the glacier that occupied the southwest part of the southern Vale of York at the Last Glacial Maximum are defined in relation to recent temporary exposures at Lindholme and previous regional mapping by Geoff Gaunt. Erratic content of associated diamicts indicates sources in the Yorkshire Dales, over Stainmore and along the Permo-...
Article
Full-text available
One of the last papers which Alan was working on when he died was a short note on a flint artefact from the surface of a gravel scrape at Lindholme in South Yorkshire. This was found during fieldwork by Robert Friend, a postgraduate student in Geography at the University of Edinburgh, working on the limits of the last glaciation in the Vale of York...
Article
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Animal dung is evaluated here as a tool to reconstruct recent societal and environmental changes. Studies completed on the macro- and micro-contents from dung deposited in a mountain cave in Catalonia during the 1970–1980s, preceding the socio-economic changes in the area, was supplemented by the testimony of the last shepherd alive in the area. Th...
Research
Full-text available
Updated version of bibliography to 20.12.16
Article
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During the Last Glacial Maximum, the Vale of York and North Sea lobes of the British and Irish Ice Sheet extended to within 10km of each other, impounding a series of pro-glacial lakes. Such an interplay of ice lobes provides a useful analogue for elsewhere in the North Sea basin. This paper focusses on reconstructing the Vale of York and North Sea...
Article
Full-text available
The use of a wide range of narcotic drugs in antiquity has been widely documented, although archaeologists have sometimes been too credulous of apparently scientific data, and have failed to appreciate the post-excavation histories of artefacts, including mummies. This paper examines the discovery of tobacco in the mummy of Rameses II, provides an...
Article
Results from AMS dating applied to insect chitin from a variety of contexts and different preservation conditions and retrieval methods are presented. Secure contexts, which include other dated organic material from different geographic locations ranging from Egypt to Greenland and different chronological periods, from Lateglacial to Medieval, have...
Article
Full-text available
Re-produced by kind permission of Antenna, the magazine of the Royal Entomological Society. Several recent papers in a range of entomological and biogeographical journals (e.g. Abellán et al. 2010; Foster & Carr 2008) have drawn attention to the importance of the Quaternary insect fossil record, both in terms of species distribution and conservati...
Chapter
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Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the planet, and as suchare present in a wider variety of habitats than most other organism groups.This diversity, in addition to a long evolutionary ...
Article
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The Early Iron Age enclosures and associated sites on Sutton Common on the western edge of the Humberhead Levels contain an exceptional variety of archaeological data of importance not only to the region but for the study of later prehistory in the British Isles. Few other later prehistoric British sites outside the East Anglian fens and the Somers...
Article
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Attributing a season and a date to the volcanic eruption of Santorini in the Aegean has become possible by using preserved remains of the bean weevil, Bruchus rufipes, pests of pulses, from the storage jars of the West House, in the Bronze Age settlement at Akrotiri. We have applied an improved pre-treatment methodology for dating the charred insec...
Article
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Excavations close to the Anglo-Saxon church at Conisbrough, South Yorkshire, UK, revealed a plank-walled construction dated by dendrochronology to the late sixth or early seventh century. It is suggested that this formed part of a stock pond for fish, associated with an elite residence to which a partly surviving Anglo-Saxon church incorporating No...
Article
Palaeoecological research based on insect remains from the vicinity of a Norse farm at Tasiusaq in southwest Greenland provides information on the area surrounding the farm and new information on extirpations attributed to human impact. Anthropochorous species (spread by people) from the farm faunas are lacking in the assemblages, and the natural f...
Article
Palaeoecological research based on insect remains from the vicinity of a Norse farm at Tasiusaq in southwest Greenland provides information on the area surrounding the farm and new information on extirpations attributed to human impact. Anthropochorous species (spread by people) from the farm faunas are lacking in the assemblages, and the natural f...
Article
Initial European, Norse, settlement in south-west Greenland lasted from the late tenth to the fifteenth century, with an economy largely based on secondary products from sheep, goats and cattle, supplemented by caribou and marine mammal hunting. Sustainable subsistence farming required acquisition of sufficient fodder, principally hay, to feed stal...
Article
Full-text available
Southwest Greenland was settled, largely from Iceland, at the end of the tenth century. Agriculture, based upon secondary products from domestic animals, lasted until the fifteenth century when the last farms were finally abandoned. From the twelfth century, the inhabitants had their own bishop and cathedral at Gar冒ar in the more southerly Eastern...
Article
An insect fauna associated with the medieval burial of Archbishop Greenfield, interred in December 1315 in a lead coffin within a stone sarcophagus beneath the floor of York Minster, is examined and compared with the limited entomological data from other medieval burials. The implications of the archaeoentomological data are discussed. The fauna is...
Article
Initial European, Norse, settlement in southwest Greenland lasted from the late tenth to the fifteenth century, with an economy largely based on secondary products from sheep, goats and cattle, supplemented by caribou and marine mammal hunting. Sustainable subsistence farming required acquisition of sufficient fodder, principally hay, to feed stall...
Article
Full-text available
Environmental Archaeology. Approaches, Techniques and Applications. By WilkinsonKeith and StevensChris. 250mm. Pp 320, ills. Stroud: Tempus, 2003. ISBN 0752419315. £25. - Volume 84 - P C Buckland
Article
Alluvial Archaeology in Britain. Edited by NeedhamStuart P. and MacklinMark. 300mm. Pp. xiii + 277, ills. Oxford: Oxbow Books, Oxbow Monograph, 27, 1992. ISBN 0-946897-52-2. £35.00. - Volume 78 - P. C. Buckland
Article
Full-text available
Star Carr in Context. By MellarsPaul and DarkPetra. 290mm. Pp xiii + 250, ills. Cambridge: McDonald Institute Monographs, 1998. ISBN 0-9519420-4-2. £40.00. - Volume 80 Issue 1 - P C Buckland
Article
Bateman, M. D., Buckland, P. C., Whyte, M. A., Ashurst, R. A., Boulter, C. & Panagiotakopulu, E. 2011: Re-evaluation of the Last Glacial Maximum typesite at Dimlington, UK. Boreas, 10.1111/j.1502-3885.2011.00204.x. ISSN 0300-9483. Recent erosion has allowed re-examination of the stratigraphy and sampling for both optically stimulated luminescence d...
Article
The city of Akhetaten, modern day Amarna, was founded by the monotheist pharoah Akhenaten as his new capital ca. 1353 BC, and abandoned within about 25 years. Much of the site has been excavated over the past century and few deposits remain undisturbed. In one house, however, that of the king's chief charioteer, Ranefer, rebuilding had sealed occup...
Article
Environmental change has a human dimension, and has had so for at least the last 10 000 years. The prehistoric impact of people on the Arctic landscape has occasionally left visible traces, such as house and field structures. More often than not, however, the only evidence available is at the microscopic or geochemical level, such as fossil insect...